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shop trying to con me?

Little Munchkin Avatar
6y, 9m agoPosted 6 years, 9 months ago
I was in a shop earlier and they gave me a Scottish fiver in my change (I'm in England). I pointed it out and asked for an English note. The shop assistant gave me a load of attitude. I said as far as I am aware it is up o the individual shops in this country whether or not they want to take Scottish notes as it's not legal tender. Whereas English notes are legal tender in Scotland and I don't want to be stuck with a note nobody want to accept. She tried arguing with me and telling me I was wrong......was I right or wrong??? Lol I got it swapped anyway.
Little Munchkin Avatar
6y, 9m agoPosted 6 years, 9 months ago
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#1
Bank of Eng Website

Are Scottish & Northern Irish notes legal tender?
In short ‘No’ these notes are not legal tender; only Bank of England notes are legal tender but only in England and Wales.
The term legal tender does not in itself govern the acceptability of banknotes in transactions. Whether or not notes have legal tender status, their acceptability as a means of payment is essentially a matter for agreement between the parties involved. Legal tender has a very narrow technical meaning in relation to the settlement of debt. If a debtor pays in legal tender the exact amount he owes under the terms of a contract, he has good defence in law if he is subsequently sued for non-payment of the debt. In ordinary everyday transactions, the term ‘legal tender’ has very little practical application.
#2
you did right thing IMO
#3
as long as it's got stirling on it its fine
#4
What? Why would you think scottish notes weren't legal tender? lol
#5
:roll:
#6
warehousestock
Its Legal Tender! Anywhere!


:? well they wouldn't accept a Scottish or an English note were I to try and use them in a shop in France
#7
Scottish notes are legal tender in England :roll:
#8
Imho you were being petty!
#9
you were right.
#10
Course they are legal tender, but I've been refused using one in a small shop before now. Right to refuse it imo, I always do.
#11
You are right. A lot of my local shops won't accept Scottish notes.
#12
Are Scottish & Northern Irish notes legal tender?
In short ‘No’ these notes are not legal tender; only Bank of England notes are legal tender but only in England and Wales.
The term legal tender does not in itself govern the acceptability of banknotes in transactions. Whether or not notes have legal tender status, their acceptability as a means of payment is essentially a matter for agreement between the parties involved. Legal tender has a very narrow technical meaning in relation to the settlement of debt. If a debtor pays in legal tender the exact amount he owes under the terms of a contract, he has good defence in law if he is subsequently sued for non-payment of the debt. In ordinary everyday transactions, the term ‘legal tender’ has very little practical application.

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/about/faqs.htm#16
#13
whats wrong with scottish notes? the shop obviuosly accepted it as payment wthout any probs
#14
You are right: It's up to you if you want to accept it or not. Same goes for the shopkeeper.

Near the border most people are fairly flexible but as you move further south many shopkeepers do not want to risk taking notes that they are not familiar with (as they could be a forgery).

When I visit Scotland I try not to come back with any "funny money" as I know it will be a pain trying to use it.
#15
think in the bigger shops they are ok to use but both parties need to agree
#16
i've just looked at the bank of england website lol it says the term 'legal tender' has very little practical application BUT they aren't legal tender in England and Wales only Bank of England notes are. However payment is a matter of agreement for the parties involved so if a shop wants to accept them they can.

I knew there was something about them beacuse I remember being given real grief over one in a shop several years ago when they wouldn't accept it.
banned#17
hellfire
What? Why would you think scottish notes weren't legal tender? lol


because they aren't?
#18
It's legal tender. Why the **** would you think that somebody giving you a Scottish note was a con?

Made my day anyway.
#19
lol...........
#20
yes the shop was trying to con you......
#21
For those saying it's not a legal tender, read the quotes from the BoE website

It says it's not a "legal tender" but the word "legal tender" has little meaning. It's up to both parties to agree to use the notes to complete the transaction. It works the same for Euro's.

You will find down south (more in London) will accept euro's but the further north you go, you will find very few accept them.
#22
dontdothatagain
It's legal tender. Why the **** would you think that somebody giving you a Scottish note was a con?

Made my day anyway.


nice to see you read the thread then...

its up to both parties..in this case OP didnt agree and was in the right I dont accept Scottish notes because of the grief you get with them down here
#23
I am happy to accept any Scottish notes you don't want !!!!!
#24
numptyj
nice to see you read the thread then...

its up to both parties..in this case OP didnt agree and was in the right I dont accept Scottish notes because of the grief you get with them down here


Well take it to any bank and they will swap for a "english" note. I am in the far south and can use scottish notes freely.
#25
what a fuss........its a scottish note

they can be used in england full stop..............its not a con ffs small store may not take but hmv, supermarkets etc will np
#26
faevilangel
Well take it to any bank and they will swap for a "english" note. I am in the far south and can use scottish notes freely.


spot on mate i work in a shop at the weekends and its right we except them some areas are wary about them as they are from Scotland and look more like the euro notes than the English versions but dude in quote is spot on i've done it a couple o times in northen england much to my annoyance after a few annoying shops

on the main note you can ask for a different note but except my my nothern travel never had a prob using them when i've had them even in my local, differnt horses for different courses!
#27
casparwhite
what a fuss........its a scottish note

they can be used in england full stop..............its not a con ffs small store may not take but hmv, supermarkets etc will np


+1
#28
While i don't agree with the poster's response to receiving a scottish note, i do understand. I too make sure i don't have scottish notes anywhere other than Scotland. Truely pathetic that UK retailers would refuse it....but they DO. Banks don't have a problem cashing them so it is either ignorance, pettyness or racism (is being anti-scottish racist?).

Go abroad and some countries advertise different exchange rates. And you wonder why many feel subjugated.
#29
Funny how most counterfeit money tends to be 'english tender'


Reminds me, next time i get an english fiver in my change to kick up a fuss to get it swapped for real money.
#30
shanecr
Funny how most counterfeit money tends to be 'english tender'


Reminds me, next time i get an english fiver in my change to kick up a fuss to get it swapped for real money.


wonder if that has anything to do with this thread.........few retailers not accepting it in the first place wouldnt be a good start for trying to pass off counterfeit notes now would it?:thinking:
banned#31
stevieglesga
While i don't agree with the poster's response to receiving a scottish note, i do understand. I too make sure i don't have scottish notes anywhere other than Scotland. Truely pathetic that UK retailers would refuse it....but they DO. Banks don't have a problem cashing them so it is either ignorance, pettyness or racism (is being anti-scottish racist?).

Go abroad and some countries advertise different exchange rates. And you wonder why many feel subjugated.


racist pmsl
So if someone comes into a shop with some yen you would be racist for not accepting them?
#32
colinsunderland
racist pmsl
So if someone comes into a shop with some yen you would be racist for not accepting them?


They are Sterling notes that are accepted by the Bank of England. So i will restate my point for the hard of thinking. It is either ignorance or pettiness because they are scottish notes. The cause may or may not be rooted in anti scottish feelings.

My post even went on to question whether being anti scottish is racist or not.
1 Like #33
If Yen were legal tender in the UK, yes I wouldn't have a problem accepting them, unfortunately we're part of the UK, so whilst the rules of the BoE may say it's not legal to accept Scottish money, it is bloody racist.

I've had no end of trouble, especially in *rural* England using my Scottish money - where most of the shopkeepers say "nah... don't take funny jocko money", despite the fact I have a Scottish accent. Now if *we* were to do that to all you English.... it'd soon be racist and in the news.

Thank god we don't get called Jocks, or Jimmy or other names too when we're down south - now that would be racist :whistling:
#34
warehousestock
Bank of Eng Website

Are Scottish & Northern Irish notes legal tender?
In short ‘No’ these notes are not legal tender; only Bank of England notes are legal tender but only in England and Wales.
The term legal tender does not in itself govern the acceptability of banknotes in transactions. Whether or not notes have legal tender status, their acceptability as a means of payment is essentially a matter for agreement between the parties involved. Legal tender has a very narrow technical meaning in relation to the settlement of debt. If a debtor pays in legal tender the exact amount he owes under the terms of a contract, he has good defence in law if he is subsequently sued for non-payment of the debt. In ordinary everyday transactions, the term ‘legal tender’ has very little practical application.


What a load of old cobblers...

Northern Irish (and Scottish) money is the same as the English.

Sure the notes look different, but they are valued the same. Bloody English morons... Ticks me off how arrogant they (the banks etc) are (and thus the shops are too).

Over here, we accept N.Irish (duh), English, Scottish and even Clydesdale bank notes!
#35
They are unfamiliar, so people are unsure if what they are accepting is real. When the £2 coin first came out, I had a couple of run ins with a few thick sales assistants. When I used to work at WHS, we were told to accept them (by getting a supervisor to check it), but we were not allowed to give it out as change. Tbh I wouldn't want to be given any Scottish money as change and would ask for English tender. Equally I wouldn't want/try to avoid £50 notes, but that's a whole different issue.
#36
phoenixalpha
If Yen were legal tender in the UK, yes I wouldn't have a problem accepting them, unfortunately we're part of the UK, so whilst the rules of the BoE may say it's not legal to accept Scottish money, it is bloody racist.

I've had no end of trouble, especially in *rural* England using my Scottish money - where most of the shopkeepers say "nah... don't take funny jocko money", despite the fact I have a Scottish accent. Now if *we* were to do that to all you English.... it'd soon be racist and in the news.

Thank god we don't get called Jocks, or Jimmy or other names too when we're down south - now that would be racist :whistling:


When I tried to pay for drink with a Northern Irish £10 as an experiment in an English pub a few years ago, the girl behind the bar said something along the lines of "Is this monopoly money?" or "we don't take monopoly money".

Bloody moron. Wanted to give her a taste of my backhand...
#37
when i worked in a shop we were told we could accept them but were not allowed to give them back as change
#38
Little Munchkin
:? well they wouldn't accept a Scottish or an English note were I to try and use them in a shop in France


You're meant to use Euros in France... :whistling::thinking::?
#39
DragonChris
You're meant to use Euros in France... :whistling::thinking::?


lol that was in response to being told they're legal tender anywhere....my point was they're not accepted anywhere and everywhere. I may be dim but i'm not so dim that I don't know to use Euros in France ;-)

It would make things a whole lot easier if we just had a world wide currency *waits to be shot down in flames*
#40
Yeah I am Scottish but have a neutral accent so a few times when I have had Scottish notes have been told racist jokes like "better make sure the Scottish people dont realise you have their money"

In tourist places like holiday parks generally its accepted, I remember in Scarborough going to an indian take away and asking if a Scottish note is ok and was told "of course most of our customers are Scottish"

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