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Speed Fan And Speccy show different laptop temperatures - Which one to believe?

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I have speedfan installed and its showing my cpu at 50C whereas speccy is saying the cpu is 60. Speccy is always 10C higher for the cpu but the graphics card temp is the same on both. Which …
bob100 Avatar
6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
I have speedfan installed and its showing my cpu at 50C whereas speccy is saying the cpu is 60.

Speccy is always 10C higher for the cpu but the graphics card temp is the same on both.

Which one is more accurate?
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bob100 Avatar
6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
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#1
Or HWmonitor for everything or Coretemp for just the cpu
#2
Is Speccy not that good its from Piriform and has got good reviews?
2 Likes #3
I’m presuming that you aren’t aware of how modern CPUs report their temps so here’s a primer; at least for Intel CPUs.
Intel CPUs have multiple Digital Thermal Sensors (DTS) built on chip which report data that RELATES to the internal temperatures. Note that I say relates as that is the key point and why different programmes report different temps.
The DTS values are actually offsets from the highest safe temperature that Intel has chosen for a particular CPU. I forget Intel’s correct terminology but I’ll call it TMax for brevity.
In practice what this means is that if TMax is 100C and the DTS value is 25 then the actual temp is 100 – 25 = 75. Likewise for the same TMax:
DTS = 50, Temp = 100 – 50 = 50
DTS = 75, Temp = 100 – 75 = 25
DTS = 0, Temp = 100 – 0 = 100
In other words the smaller the DTS value the higher the temperature.

The issue is that Intel doesn’t generally publish the data for what TMax is for a particular CPU or range of CPUs. Therefore it is impossible to know the exact temp of your CPU and this is why different programmes guestimate TMax values which means that they show different ‘estimated’ temperatures.
They are all using the same accurate DTS readings but as they don’t know for certain the actual TMax value they can’t accurately calculate the real temperature.
Since Actual Temp = (TMax – DTS) if you don’t know TMax for certain, which is hardly surprising as it’s not published information, then Actual Temp is based on the guess of what TMax is.

Ultimately it isn’t an issue as don’t worry about your actual temp but focus on how close you are to the critical temp, TMax, which is the temp that the CPU uses to determine if it is dangerously hot and needs to throttle itself to reduce heat output and hopefully also lower temperature.
So the important data is the DTS values, which are accurate, and I suggest should be what is focused on when looking at CPU cooling.
CoreTemp allows you to view the actual DTS values rather than the estimated temps which makes more sense to me.
Some people are stuck in the past and think in terms of the old days when motherboards used to report supposed actual temps although they were often inaccurate anyway. Intel know their own CPUs better than reviewers and over-clockers so trust that the DTS values are what is most meaningful as it relate directly to what Intel says is important.
Keep in mind that different chip ranges can have different TMax values which for me increases the importance of focusing on the DTS values and not the guessed temperatures. Who cares if its 75 or 100 or 125 Centigrade that is the safe temp so long as you know how close you are to it.

dcx_badass
Speedfan is awful, use everest.

I’ve used it for about 10 years in dozens of systems and never had a problem with it. Its primary purpose is to change fan speeds based on temperature; does Everest also now do that now? I have used it in the past occasionally as it was the best programme that I could find for monitoring fans at very low RPM (> 700 rpm) but aren’t aware of its current features.
#4
Thanks for the help i have a laptop with a Intel Core 2 Quad Q6700 @ 2.66GHz

Speccy reports it at 61 °C

Speedfan has it at 51 °C (average of 4 cores)

So can you help me find out what the highest temp i can have?
What is my Actual Temp?

Thanks for any help im just a bit confused with this. lol
#5


Tcase? What does that mean?

And are my temp ok?
1 Like #6
dcx_badass
I'm not spoon feeding you, google tcase if you want.


OMG what a d**k!

Asking for help and thats your response

Edited By: bob100 on Nov 20, 2010 21:20
#7
dcx_badass
No, it was already explained in this thread, I then went on the Intel site (no idea why you couldn't do that yourself), and got the Tcase temp is after you asked, you then ask another question which could be easily googled, we'll help people but if they are obviously taking the **** what are you really expecting.


How am i taking the **** i doubt many people would understand the jargon in this text and as i said i am one of those as i am confused by this all.

And by the way the term "TCase" has only come up when you stated it.

Anyway forget it ill get help elsewhere
1 Like #8
Forget about TCase and other figures that Intel publishes as it’s the one that they don’t publish that relates to the DTS temp figures.
I suggest you download CoreTemp and run it and then click on Options from the Menu and then choose Settings. Select the Advanced tab and select the tick box for the option ‘Display the Distance to TjMax in temperature fields’.
The temperatures reported will then be how far you are from TjMax which is the critical temp for the CPU. i.e. the higher the figure the cooler the CPU.
This is the only guaranteed useful and accurate data as the rest is a guess. Don’t rely on any programmes estimate of actual temp as it’s irrelevant.

Think of it like this. When you look at the rev counter on a car the important part is where the red line is not whether it’s at 6,000 or 8,000 rpm. So the method above which is also sometimes known as DTS offset tells you how far you are from the red line in absolute terms.
Speedfan etc are trying to guess what the rpm of the redline is when what really matters is how much reserve you have. Of course a car has a band for the redline but for TjMax it is a single value.

dcx_badass
Intel publish the Tmax (but not DTS which I'd not heard of before) for all it's CPU's and have always done.

DTS is the on-chip sensor(s) and its temp readings vary depending on the current scenario. Programmes such as Speedfan, Everest, CoreTemp etc all access the DTS readings and attempt to calculate actual temps from that.
When Speedfan disagrees with Everest by 10C it just means that they disagree in their guess about what TjMax is for that chip but the DTS readings will be the same.
Most decent programmes such as Speedfan will allow you to add an offset to reported values as they know that there is no guarantee that they can provide accurate absolute values.
#9
Agharta
Forget about TCase and other figures that Intel publishes as it’s the one that they don’t publish that relates to the DTS temp figures.
I suggest you download CoreTemp and run it and then click on Options from the Menu and then choose Settings. Select the Advanced tab and select the tick box for the option ‘Display the Distance to TjMax in temperature fields’.
The temperatures reported will then be how far you are from TjMax which is the critical temp for the CPU. i.e. the higher the figure the cooler the CPU.
This is the only guaranteed useful and accurate data as the rest is a guess. Don’t rely on any programmes estimate of actual temp as it’s irrelevant.

Think of it like this. When you look at the rev counter on a car the important part is where the red line is not whether it’s at 6,000 or 8,000 rpm. So the method above which is also sometimes known as DTS offset tells you how far you are from the red line in absolute terms.
Speedfan etc are trying to guess what the rpm of the redline is when what really matters is how much reserve you have. Of course a car has a band for the redline but for TjMax it is a single value.

dcx_badass
Intel publish the Tmax (but not DTS which I'd not heard of before) for all it's CPU's and have always done.

DTS is the on-chip sensor(s) and its temp readings vary depending on the current scenario. Programmes such as Speedfan, Everest, CoreTemp etc all access the DTS readings and attempt to calculate actual temps from that.
When Speedfan disagrees with Everest by 10C it just means that they disagree in their guess about what TjMax is for that chip but the DTS readings will be the same.
Most decent programmes such as Speedfan will allow you to add an offset to reported values as they know that there is no guarantee that they can provide accurate absolute values.


Thanks that makes sense, ill just keep my temps below tjmax temps

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