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Stargazing Live - Camera Tips for a complete amateur...

emhaslam Avatar
5y, 11m agoPosted 5 years, 11 months ago
Anyone else been watching? Fantastic stuff so far imo.

Would love to take some photos, and apparently my camera (digital compact - Fujifilm F200EXR) has some adjustable settings. Can anyone give me a guide as to what I should have...

Aperture - F3.3 or F9
Exposure - 1000 (I think 1/1000) to 8" - no idea what any of that means...
ISO - 800 ish?!

Thanks in-advance
emhaslam Avatar
5y, 11m agoPosted 5 years, 11 months ago
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1 Like #1
The BBC has the help video from the Stargazing Live program LINK

Though, reading your post, I`m not sure if it goes into enough detail for you. I`ll see if I can find any of the forums that I`ve seen discuss this.

Are you planning on taking photos just with the camera, or do you have a telescope?

EDIT - THIS is a decent forum to ask on, though I can`t find their older articles on astrophotography at the mo. Just so you know, it is hosted by a telescope company (FLO), but it`s not unduly biased towards them.


Edited By: Crowman on Jan 05, 2011 15:13
#2
Just the camera.

Getting a semi-decent night time shot of the sky would be good enough for me... Hope its possible...
1 Like #3
I am by no means an expert in this, but have also been doing some reading around because I thought it was quite interesting... just a couple of things I picked up on...
- apparently you want an aperture around 5.6, or at least that's what the bloke on TV used with his DSLR.. if you can only select 3.3 or 9 then I'd suggest trying with both.
- he also used ISO 1600, but again, try 800!
- Exposure (or shutter speed if that helps) depends on the type of photo you're trying to take i suppose... a long exposure (i.e. 8 seconds) and you'll see your subject move in the frame, too fast and it might be too dark...
- you'll definitely need a tripod :p

and don't forget, it's digital, so just keep trying different settings until you get the picture you're after... there probably aren't any exact settings you need :)
banned 1 Like #4
and take the picture on a tripod with a card in front of the lens and remove once shutter pressed. Stops exposure shake when you press the shutter.
1 Like #5
csiman
and take the picture on a tripod with a card in front of the lens and remove once shutter pressed. Stops exposure shake when you press the shutter.


I'd never seen that trick before the other night, my approach is to set a 2sec timer on the camera which gives the same result without the need for the card/paper :)
#6
Crowman
The BBC has the help video from the Stargazing Live program LINK

Though, reading your post, I`m not sure if it goes into enough detail for you. I`ll see if I can find any of the forums that I`ve seen discuss this.

Are you planning on taking photos just with the camera, or do you have a telescope?

EDIT - THIS is a decent forum to ask on, though I can`t find their older articles on astrophotography at the mo. Just so you know, it is hosted by a telescope company (FLO), but it`s not unduly biased towards them.



Cheers. I'll have a gander on that forum...


chrismarriott66
I am by no means an expert in this, but have also been doing some reading around because I thought it was quite interesting... just a couple of things I picked up on...
- apparently you want an aperture around 5.6, or at least that's what the bloke on TV used with his DSLR.. if you can only select 3.3 or 9 then I'd suggest trying with both.
- he also used ISO 1600, but again, try 800!
- Exposure (or shutter speed if that helps) depends on the type of photo you're trying to take i suppose... a long exposure (i.e. 8 seconds) and you'll see your subject move in the frame, too fast and it might be too dark...
- you'll definitely need a tripod :p

and don't forget, it's digital, so just keep trying different settings until you get the picture you're after... there probably aren't any exact settings you need :)


Thanks for having a look for me - seems good advice. I'll give 1600 a go, but I'd imagine it would come out really noisy on a compact.Looks like I'll have to play with different settings...

csiman
and take the picture on a tripod with a card in front of the lens and remove once shutter pressed. Stops exposure shake when you press the shutter.


oh yeah, forgot about the card! cheers.

I might go and have a play tonight if the cloud disappears...
#7
chrismarriott66
csiman
and take the picture on a tripod with a card in front of the lens and remove once shutter pressed. Stops exposure shake when you press the shutter.


I'd never seen that trick before the other night, my approach is to set a 2sec timer on the camera which gives the same result without the need for the card/paper :)


Very smart...
#8
1600 might be quite noisy, but i suppose it's a landscape of the sky so you might get away with it if you don't start cropping and enlarging the image... Going to 800 will just decrease your shutter speed so it depends on whether you can get away with it or not :)
banned#9
chrismarriott66
I'd never seen that trick before the other night, my approach is to set a 2sec timer on the camera which gives the same result without the need for the card/paper :)


I didn't get that either, pointless. I set mine to 10sec timer though just to be sure :)

Can't remember the settings but the higher the ISO, the more fuzz you get. Can anyone explain the white artifacts?

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5082/5272328047_483692eb97_z.jpg





Edited By: lumoruk on Jan 05, 2011 15:51
#10
Your camera goes up to 8 seconds in night shot so set the camera to night shot,set ISO to 100 or auto,Use a tripod or rest the camera on something and use the self timer to avoid shake,
#11
http://i52.tinypic.com/120nfxy.jpg
ISO 160
8 sec
F3.3
Taken through bedroom window with my Samsung wb600
1 Like #12
Hot pixels, What camera is this ?.
lumoruk
chrismarriott66
I'd never seen that trick before the other night, my approach is to set a 2sec timer on the camera which gives the same result without the need for the card/paper :)
I didn't get that either, pointless. I set mine to 10sec timer though just to be sure :)Can't remember the settings but the higher the ISO, the more fuzz you get. Can anyone explain the white artifacts? http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5082/5272328047_483692eb97_z.jpg
banned#13
tonyg1962
Hot pixels, What camera is this ?.


FujiFilm S2800, yes I know it's a budget camera :p
#14
The "Hot Pixels" are just pixels on the CCD that locked in position and so produced white spots. Can happen on long exposures.

Edited By: CyDoNiA on Jan 05, 2011 16:08
banned#15
CyDoNiA
The "Hot Pixels" are just pixels on the CCD that locked in position and so produced white spots. Can happen on long exposures.


Yeah now I know the name of the problem, I did a search and even Canon suffer from it

http://nzdigital.blogspot.com/2008/03/canon-5d-and-hot-pixels.html

Edited By: lumoruk on Jan 05, 2011 16:09
#16
I watched this programme the other night.
I'm not into photography, or the stars, but was glued to the TV.
1 Like #17
Many cameras suffer from hot pixels when taking long exposures but some cameras remove them during processing when you shoot in Night shot mode,
#18
as soon as the skies clear (which is tonight hopefully) i'm going to give it a whirl with my DSLR, then hopefully i'll know a bit more about which settings work and which don't :p
banned#19
tonyg1962
Many cameras suffer from hot pixels when taking long exposures but some cameras remove them during processing when you shoot in Night shot mode,


Will try night shot mode next time then, was using custom program mode thing
#20
If It's clear tonight I am going to try this for the first time.

The plough is usually pretty visible from here so will try that.

Something it didn't mention was where/how to focus?
#21
sancho1983
If It's clear tonight I am going to try this for the first time.

The plough is usually pretty visible from here so will try that.

Something it didn't mention was where/how to focus?


you will be focusing at infinity i'd guess, although I don't know how to control that on a compact... lets just hope it can autofocus!

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