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Starting afresh and am lost to what partitions to create with Windows XP

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I'm starting afresh with my computer and installing everything again, but I'm rather lost with the talk of partitions and the sizes that should be allocated. I have one internal hard drive (500gb) …
Savage_Gizmo Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
I'm starting afresh with my computer and installing everything again, but I'm rather lost with the talk of partitions and the sizes that should be allocated.

I have one internal hard drive (500gb) and two external hard drives (500gb & 1tb)

I just don't know how to go and partition the internal one though? How much should be allocated for Windows, should the program files be stored on a separate partition? Is it best to create a partition for ghosting and images (I know nothing about this, only came about it while looking through the net and discussions on partitioning).

I mainly use my system for storing media files, video, music etc.

Any help or pointers would be appreciated because I want to get this right so I don't have to mess about with the partitions again in the near future.
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Savage_Gizmo Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
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1 Like #1
for a novice user a single partition is easiest.
backup anything you want to keep onto your external drives then unplug them
simply boot up from the windows cd and when it asks if you want to repair your current installation choose no, then when it comes to the current partition section simply delete all the partitions
then choose the unpartitioned space for the install and format using quick format (you'll see how to do this during the install) it will then start the installation process. once finished you'll need to reinstall your drivers and whatever programs you want. you can then plug in your external drives and voila

edit one thing though is that some manufacturers don't provide install media but instead use hidden partitions, in this case dont delete the partitions but use their disaster recovery media instead. usually accessed via an F key during boot
1 Like #2
If you want to separate the main HDD into two partitions, then I would suggest leaving about 100-250GB for your C and the other half or more for the D, although if you have 1.5tb of external, I doubt you'd even need to partition your drive.

But up to you, depends how much space you think you might need for programs etc.
#3
It a very open ended question and partitoning a disk for failure recovery makes little difference if its the same physical disk as if one goes, so does the other. If you have a need for partitioning then that need will dictate your set-up.
As a starting point, you could create a 10Gb partition for windows to allow a decent sized pagefile, hibernation file, recycle bin etc and put your other files on the remainder of the disk. If you plan on putting ghost images of your files somewhere as a backup, then put them on your external drive as having them on the same physical media is a risk.
1 Like #4
If you have the room you are far better creating a smallish partition for Windows and your programs and then other partitions for your personal files.

The benefit is that you separate your "Windows" and system files from your "personal" files. If Windows crashes and you need to reinstall Windows from a backup image you dont lose your personal files on the other partitions.

Your Windows partition only needs to be about 10Gb but best to make it 20Gb or more to make sure. Then split the rest of the drive into say 200Gb or so partitions.

So if it was my hard disk I would do

C: - Between 20Gb and 50Gb ( for Windows / programs etc )

D: - Say 200Gb for personal files

E: - The rest of the 500Gb drive for personal files (around 250Gb).

(This assumes your CD/DVD drive is F - you can change your device letters inside Windows to make it whatever letter you want).

You can delete and create partitions during the Windows install.

When you get to the point in the install, delete ALL your partitions, then create just one 20Gb to 50Gb partition, format it, and then continue with the install.

You can create the other partitions AFTER the Windows install has finished.

Make sure you back up ALL you personal files before starting as this process will delete
EVERYTHING off the hard drive.
#5
Partitioning isn't worth the hassle. I know some people are weird and like to have one partiton for the OS, another for apps, another for music, another for photos, and another for whatever else, but these tend to be slightly spazzy people who haven't figured out that folders do the same thing, except without the predefined space limitations. The drive image / ghosting thing is a valid point, but with Windows releases from this century being able to be repaired using the disc and with System Restore, it isn't really relevant any more. So stick with your single, full drive spanning partitions, it's the most convenient way.
#6
suchafunkymonkey
As a starting point, you could create a 10Gb partition for windows to allow a decent sized pagefile, hibernation file, recycle bin etc.


I think with Vista 10Gb is a little tight.

My XP install (with MS Office) but no personal files takes 8.41Gb.

A Vista install with Office and few other applications and pagefile etc can easily get near to 10Gb to I think 20Gb is a MINIMUM for a Windows partition.
#7
dxx
but these tend to be slightly spazzy people....


No need for that sort of comment.

spazzy is a shortened term for Spastic which is a severly disabled person.

Read the Wiki article here, particularly the section "Evolution of the term in the United Kingdom"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spastic
#8
Cheers for all your responses.

I'm thinking that I'm going to keep it simple and create a 50gb partition (C:) for windows and program files etc etc and partition the remainder as D: the only thing is I don't know whether this amount will be big enough so is it possible in the future to extend the C: partition?
#9
I've taken the plunge and allocated 100gb for windows and the program files, I'd rather have too much space than too little. Thanks again for all the replies!
#10
you can extend the partition later on, either using 3rd party tools such as partition manager or with vista you can do this natively
#11
guilbert53
If you have the room you are far better creating a smallish partition for Windows and your programs and then other partitions for your personal files.

The benefit is that you separate your "Windows" and system files from your "personal" files. If Windows crashes and you need to reinstall Windows from a backup image you dont lose your personal files on the other partitions.

Your Windows partition only needs to be about 10Gb but best to make it 20Gb or more to make sure. Then split the rest of the drive into say 200Gb or so partitions.

So if it was my hard disk I would do

C: - Between 20Gb and 50Gb ( for Windows / programs etc )

D: - Say 200Gb for personal files

E: - The rest of the 500Gb drive for personal files (around 250Gb).

(This assumes your CD/DVD drive is F - you can change your device letters inside Windows to make it whatever letter you want).

You can delete and create partitions during the Windows install.

When you get to the point in the install, delete ALL your partitions, then create just one 20Gb to 50Gb partition, format it, and then continue with the install.

You can create the other partitions AFTER the Windows install has finished.

Make sure you back up ALL you personal files before starting as this process will delete
EVERYTHING off the hard drive.


This guy is spot on, I didn't used to partition my drives, but now that I have done it, it makes life so much easier. Create one partition ~30gb for windows and progs and the rest for your personal files.

dxx
Partitioning isn't worth the hassle. I know some people are weird and like to have one partiton for the OS, another for apps, another for music, another for photos, and another for whatever else, but these tend to be slightly spazzy people who haven't figured out that folders do the same thing, except without the predefined space limitations. The drive image / ghosting thing is a valid point, but with Windows releases from this century being able to be repaired using the disc and with System Restore, it isn't really relevant any more. So stick with your single, full drive spanning partitions, it's the most convenient way.


Windows repair itself? You have got to be kidding me :roll:! I use Acrnonis and have imaged my windows installation, and restored it quite a few times just recently. Most notably due to Bluesoleil not unstalling itself properly and messing with my system. If I had not partitioned my drive, I would have had to transfer 160GB of files to another drive, and reinstall XP which takes a couple of hours. Acronis was done and dusted in 5 minutes!

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