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Taking a CBT

dandoc2 Avatar
7y, 9m agoPosted 7 years, 9 months ago
Hi looking to take my CBT over the next few weeks and get myself a 125cc motorbike - but just need some clarification
On my paper counterpart is says A which means able to drive any bike up to 125cc with L plates - but this is only on my counterpart not my full license - all i have on there is B - B1 and fkp

Will this do for taking my CBT or do i have to have my provisional entitlement added to my full license

Thanks

Daniel

p.s i have an automatic license will i be able to ride a manual bike?
dandoc2 Avatar
7y, 9m agoPosted 7 years, 9 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
if youve done your cbt for a 50 you can move up to a 125
#2
TomWilkoLFC
if youve done your cbt for a 50 you can move up to a 125


no am going to do my CBT in a 125cc as i need to learn the gears etc
#3
anyone answer the question?
#4
If you do your cbt and are over 17 then you will be able to ride a 125 cc motorcycle, that is automatic or manual and less then 15 bhp.
#5
the p is for a moped (50cc) but the cat A is for 125cc. You should contact the DVLA regarding the differences
#6
Yes, if you have done cbt you can drive up to 125cc (with L plates) once17....if you have a full licence you don't need the L plate.
#7
I think the counterpart of your license shows your provisional entitlements .. I would imagine thats fine for taking your CBT on as it is. I took mine a few years ago & it was great fun
#8
kassy2005
I think the counterpart of your license shows your provisional entitlements .. I would imagine thats fine for taking your CBT on as it is. I took mine a few years ago & it was great fun


ok ty
#9
Question - do all motorbikes have chokes - or can you get them without it
#10
I think if a bike is fuel injected as opposed to having a carburetor it doesnt have a choke
#11
kassy2005
I think if a bike is fuel injected as opposed to having a carburetor it doesnt have a choke


pain is some bikes cost me like £1500 insirance and others £200 so i need a bike im happy with buyt cheap

so fuel injection i need ty
#12
dandoc2;4838306
Question - do all motorbikes have chokes - or can you get them without it


Nope - you can definitely get them without, the CG125 replica I did my CBT on (08 plate), my Honda CBR125 (57 plate) and Suzuki SV650S (08 plate) do not have chokes, the Honda CB400R (R reg I think) which did have carbs had a manual choke.

What bikes do you have in mind?

I doubt the car automatic license will have any effect on the bike as you're starting from scratch with the bike. I can't decide whether it's easier or harder if you've only driven automatic, I'd driven manual cars for 11 years before taking my CBT however with the controls on the bike being very different I kept wanting to put the clutch in with my left foot and change gear with my left hand. On the bike it's change gear with the left foot and clutch in with the left hand so the clutch control I have from driving was no use as I had to relearn that with my left hand.

John
#13
I think most but not all FI have no chokes, I had a Honda NSR (01/02 I think ) till I got pregnant :O ) & i loved it , but that had a choke
#14
Johnmcl7
Nope - you can definitely get them without, the CG125 replica I did my CBT on (08 plate), my Honda CBR125 (57 plate) and Suzuki SV650S (08 plate) do not have chokes, the Honda CB400R (R reg I think) which did have carbs had a manual choke.

What bikes do you have in mind?

I doubt the car automatic license will have any effect on the bike as you're starting from scratch with the bike. I can't decide whether it's easier or harder if you've only driven automatic, I'd driven manual cars for 11 years before taking my CBT however with the controls on the bike being very different I kept wanting to put the clutch in with my left foot and change gear with my left hand. On the bike it's change gear with the left foot and clutch in with the left hand so the clutch control I have from driving was no use as I had to relearn that with my left hand.

John


had 20 lessons ina manual - i jsut couldnt get the foot control - but having the clutch in your hand i think will be easier as with cars you wear different shoes its a diff experience

But as you say i jsut use an auto so i think it will be easier to pick up the bike as i wont have the temptation to clutch down with my left foot

Dont want a bike with a choke as i had a car with that and had to get a new one as i couildnt use it

Bikes im looking at depend entirely on cost of insurance
wouldnt mind a honda nsr125 - 2004 as thats only 300 on third party fire adn theft

I really want a bike with little maintainence as possible - ive heard of some 2 strokes where you have to change the oil everytime you fill up the tank
#15
The NSR125 is a two stroke, they're not as bad as needing the oil changed each time however they do need more maintenance and their oil is more expensive. I didn't think they made the NSR125 as late as 2004 though so you may be meaning something else, I had a CBR125R as my first bike and I really liked it. Although it's a sheep in wolf's clothing I like that it didn't look quite so basic as some of the other 125 learners and while it runs out of power anything above 60 acceleration is still nippy.

John
#16
booked my CBT for 22nd April - £140 incl bike - helmet -gear - insurance and obv the day - 8.15 - 4.00
#17
Just get a scooter Dan.
#18
donnydude
Just get a scooter Dan.


nah want a motorbike

http://www.125motorbikes.co.uk/images/honda-cbr-125.jpg
#19
Quite right too, this was my CBR125R:

http://johnmcl7.smugmug.com/photos/359736369_ZYJmC-M.jpg
http://johnmcl7.smugmug.com/photos/359735624_a52N7-M.jpg

http://johnmcl7.smugmug.com/photos/409370957_xuAZ9-M.jpg

I was recommended to take my CBT on a scotter (twist 'n' go) as it's easier but I preferred taking it on the bike, there's plenty of time in the day to get familiar with the more complex controls and it means if you do ride on the road with a motorbike it's going to be easier to get started.

John
#20
Johnmcl7
Quite right too, this was my CBR125R:



I was recommended to take my CBT on a scotter (twist 'n' go) as it's easier but I preferred taking it on the bike, there's plenty of time in the day to get familiar with the more complex controls and it means if you do ride on the road with a motorbike it's going to be easier to get started.

John


Yeh everyone wants me to just ride a scooter but im not a 16 year old - cant wait to pass my CBT and then buy a bike - im defo going going for the HONDA CBR125 - comes out at about £450 third party F and T so a bargain compared to my £2k car insurance
1 Like #21
It's cheap to run as well - when I first filled mine up (bear in mind this is my first bike) I thought I'd stick a tenner in to get it running for a bit. I think I managed to squeeze in about four pounds worth before it was full and that should go for over a 100 miles - that was at the time when the car was costing me about 70 quid to fill...

One thing to bear in mind when costing it up is that you'll need some decent riding gear, helmet (required) but also a good protective jacket, trousers and gloves. Don't skimp on these and make sure you get something decent, Aldi/Lidl seem to have some good deals on these that seem to be good quality. If you crash all you have between you and the road is the clothes you're wearing so you want to make sure you have something that's going to protect you well. Of course it would be great not to crash but there's a good chance of it happening, I did crash my CBR125 (back up and running since then) when I was stupidly going down a back road in poor light and caught some gravel while going round a corner. The bike and I parted company at around 40-50mph and all I have to show for it is a friction burn on my right arm, no bruises or any other marks as the armour in the jacket and trousers took the rest.

It's well worth giving the CBT a go anyway as you're not committed, if you enjoy it then you can fire ahead but if not you can knock the idea on the head. That's the approach I took and I really enjoyed the feeling of being on the bike, even on the CBR125 despite having a reasonably fast car.

John
#22
Johnmcl7
It's cheap to run as well - when I first filled mine up (bear in mind this is my first bike) I thought I'd stick a tenner in to get it running for a bit. I think I managed to squeeze in about four pounds worth before it was full and that should go for over a 100 miles - that was at the time when the car was costing me about 70 quid to fill...

One thing to bear in mind when costing it up is that you'll need some decent riding gear, helmet (required) but also a good protective jacket, trousers and gloves. Don't skimp on these and make sure you get something decent, Aldi/Lidl seem to have some good deals on these that seem to be good quality. If you crash all you have between you and the road is the clothes you're wearing so you want to make sure you have something that's going to protect you well. Of course it would be great not to crash but there's a good chance of it happening, I did crash my CBR125 (back up and running since then) when I was stupidly going down a back road in poor light and caught some gravel while going round a corner. The bike and I parted company at around 40-50mph and all I have to show for it is a friction burn on my right arm, no bruises or any other marks as the armour in the jacket and trousers took the rest.

It's well worth giving the CBT a go anyway as you're not committed, if you enjoy it then you can fire ahead but if not you can knock the idea on the head. That's the approach I took and I really enjoyed the feeling of being on the bike, even on the CBR125 despite having a reasonably fast car.

John

Repped for that

Yeh my car cost me £4200 + £2200 insurance + £50 for a full tank
If i can fill up for a bike for like £10 + insure for £400 + buy for £1500 im saving loads
#23
Remember to bear in mind that a 125 is going to be tough on dual carriageway (no motorway on the provisional)/fast single carriageway and not much fun in poor weather conditions.

John
#24
Johnmcl7
Remember to bear in mind that a 125 is going to be tough on dual carriageway (no motorway on the provisional)/fast single carriageway and not much fun in poor weather conditions.

John

max speed im going to be going is 40mph

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