Teacher sacked for allowing pupils to use sledge in the snow - discuss - HotUKDeals
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Teacher sacked for allowing pupils to use sledge in the snow - discuss

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A friend sent me a link for this story from Sky - just wondered what other peoples opinions were. http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20110111/tuk-teacher-fired-for-letting-pupils-go-45dbed5.html Read More
jelli89 Avatar
6y, 6m agoPosted 6 years, 6 months ago
A friend sent me a link for this story from Sky - just wondered what other peoples opinions were.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20110111/tuk-teacher-fired-for-letting-pupils-go-45dbed5.html
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jelli89 Avatar
6y, 6m agoPosted 6 years, 6 months ago
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#1
#2
Sheer madness, but unsuprising.
1 Like #3
he didnt take a group of 5 year olds they are gcse students so 15-16 years old. I think they do a lot worse in their own time..i wouldnt have been bothered as a parent tbh. I would have seen it as the teacher doing something extra. Most of them wouldnt dream of giving their break time up!
2 Likes #4
Health and Safety in another shocker, dear me did these people in charge never hear this country went to war and kids were bombed in school time.
banned#5
Was absurd but he did defy an order from the Head to not allow pupils on the slopes so he goes and takes them anyway, he also lied about it when first confronted.
#6
If any action was required, surely an extension to his initial suspension would have been enough?
1 Like #7
The matter of sledging is a slippery slope - after that it's all down hill! I guess he was skating on thin ice or was that going to be the next lesson.
6 Likes #8
Probably the sort of teacher the pupils actually had some sort of connection with, which is probably why they got rid of him.
[mod]#9
Just shows what a dumb ass nation we live in that this crap goes on.
3 Likes #11
His sledge looks the DB's though.

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/50747000/jpg/_50747642_sledge304wn.jpg
#12
Misleading title.
Typical red top headline.
1 Like #13
If one of the kids broke a leg whilst doing it then the parents would be suing the school.
[mod] 2 Likes #14
nikkib123
If one of the kids broke a leg whilst doing it then the parents would be suing the school.


Which is wrong as well. I broke my leg playing football at school........others broke bones playing football/rugby. It's part and parcel of growing up.
banned 1 Like #15
nikkib123
If one of the kids broke a leg whilst doing it then the parents would be suing the school.

It's precisely this litigious society we've created for ourselves that is the problem, not "health and safety gone maaad". No organisations would concern itself it with H&S to the extent it does if it wasn't for the threat of legal action for a paper cut.
#16
nikkib123
If one of the kids broke a leg whilst doing it then the parents would be suing the school.


You are right and he should have been reprimanded in some way over his actions but sacking him was a little harsh I feel. Saying that if he had ignored the warnings from other staff it would be unlikely to be a comfortable return to work if they had kept him on.

Edited By: greg_68 on Jan 12, 2011 09:53
#17
All part of the ever evolving nanny state which is spiraling out of all proportion and control, it's going to get worse, wouldn't be suprised if in 10 years this teacher would have been either completely struct off from teaching ever again, or even executed! lol ... crazy , utter nonsense.

Happy i grew up in the era i did, instead of being wrapped up in cotton wool
banned#18
Syzable
nikkib123
If one of the kids broke a leg whilst doing it then the parents would be suing the school.


Which is wrong as well. I broke my leg playing football at school........others broke bones playing football/rugby. It's part and parcel of growing up.


When your parents bought you the rugby kit, said that it was okay to participate and maybe even took you to the games, were they smart enough to work out that physical injury was a possibility?

Now can you say the same thing for a technology lesson?

He opened the school up to the possibility of litigation. It's a sad fact of life that people will now 'claim where there's blame'. It's not the school's fault, it's not 'health and safety's' fault, it's not even political correctness's fault....
banned#19
jayjayuk1234
All part of the ever evolving nanny state which is spiraling out of all proportion and control, it's going to get worse, wouldn't be suprised if in 10 years this teacher would have been either completely struct off from teaching ever again, or even executed! lol ... crazy , utter nonsense.

Happy i grew up in the era i did, instead of being wrapped up in cotton wool


It's not the 'nanny state'. It's a reaction to the increased threat of litigation.
#20
Syzable


Which is wrong as well. I broke my leg playing football at school........others broke bones playing football/rugby. It's part and parcel of growing up.


If my son broke his leg doing something that a teacher was specifically told not to let my son do, I would be suing him/the school in a hot minute.
#21
thesaint
Syzable


Which is wrong as well. I broke my leg playing football at school........others broke bones playing football/rugby. It's part and parcel of growing up.


If my son broke his leg doing something that a teacher was specifically told not to let my son do, I would be suing him/the school in a hot minute.


WOW that is surprising.............
1 Like #22
Simple solution is everyone stay at home in a sealed environment and wrapped in cotton wool.
[mod]#23
I think the answer is to close all schools and never let our children out of our sight.
banned#24
Oh dear, is The Sun comments section down so they've decided to post here?
#25
FilthAndFurry
jayjayuk1234
All part of the ever evolving nanny state which is spiraling out of all proportion and control, it's going to get worse, wouldn't be suprised if in 10 years this teacher would have been either completely struct off from teaching ever again, or even executed! lol ... crazy , utter nonsense.

Happy i grew up in the era i did, instead of being wrapped up in cotton wool


It's not the 'nanny state'. It's a reaction to the increased threat of litigation.


It's a bit of both
#26
thesaint
Syzable


Which is wrong as well. I broke my leg playing football at school........others broke bones playing football/rugby. It's part and parcel of growing up.


If my son broke his leg doing something that a teacher was specifically told not to let my son do, I would be suing him/the school in a hot minute.


At 15/16 if my son broke his leg- I'd clip him round the earhole and tell him it's his own stupid fault for taking part. They're going to go out into the big wide world soon, and if they can't sledge in the snow safely, then how are they supposed to be able to do things like learning to drive and getting a job?

If the teacher was told not to take the kids out in the snow, then yes he should have had some sort of punishment for disobeying orders, but at the end of the day- no-one was hurt, and sledging in the snow has been done for hundreds of years, so why should they stop it now?

I think they should regulate and ban a lot of these "if there's a blame, there's a claim" companies. I fell over on a drain cover at my son's school a month or 2 back, badly sprained my ankle and hurt my back. It was covered in leaves so wasn't visible, and there was a car coming up the drive (reason for falling down the drain, moving out the way of the car) which the drive is always shut off between 8.30-9am etc, but I didn't sue the school! All the teachers were lingering around me panicking, and I had to reassure them I wasn't the type to sue!
#27
He was told not to and lied to the head, whilst the sacking and court case may have been a bit excessive; the head's authority was challenged/ignored/undermined. Flame suit donned.

Edited By: Flynn Jack on Jan 12, 2011 11:41
#28
mumbojumbo
This wasn't the moulded plastic sledge usually seen in the UK. It's a racing sledge with 3 skis designed for speed. You wouldn't expect a teacher to take a group of students skiing without proper preparation, so why think it's ok to take them sledging on one of these? Thousands are injured on ski-slopes each year.


Did he force them on it? Are they old enough to make up their own mind and say no? You're responsible for your own actions, and if these students were stupid enough to get on it- then that was their decision. He shouldn't have taken it in, I agree, but if they got on it, then they were responsible for their own safety.
1 Like #29
the education system that encourages creative free thinking individuals................pass the fire extinguisher
#30
mumbojumbo
midjet666
mumbojumbo
This wasn't the moulded plastic sledge usually seen in the UK. It's a racing sledge with 3 skis designed for speed. You wouldn't expect a teacher to take a group of students skiing without proper preparation, so why think it's ok to take them sledging on one of these? Thousands are injured on ski-slopes each year.


Did he force them on it? Are they old enough to make up their own mind and say no? You're responsible for your own actions, and if these students were stupid enough to get on it- then that was their decision. He shouldn't have taken it in, I agree, but if they got on it, then they were responsible for their own safety.


Under the teacher's supervision and on school grounds it is ultimately the school's responsibility.


But they're 15/16, they are old enough to make a sensible decision and see if they'd be at risk on the sledge. There are people younger who are giving birth to children, and they're supposed to bring them up safely, so why can't these students look after theirselves?
#31
midjet666


Did he force them on it? Are they old enough to make up their own mind and say no? You're responsible for your own actions, and if these students were stupid enough to get on it- then that was their decision. He shouldn't have taken it in, I agree, but if they got on it, then they were responsible for their own safety.


lollingtons. Holding children responsiblle.
banned#32
midjet666
mumbojumbo
midjet666
mumbojumbo
This wasn't the moulded plastic sledge usually seen in the UK. It's a racing sledge with 3 skis designed for speed. You wouldn't expect a teacher to take a group of students skiing without proper preparation, so why think it's ok to take them sledging on one of these? Thousands are injured on ski-slopes each year.


Did he force them on it? Are they old enough to make up their own mind and say no? You're responsible for your own actions, and if these students were stupid enough to get on it- then that was their decision. He shouldn't have taken it in, I agree, but if they got on it, then they were responsible for their own safety.


Under the teacher's supervision and on school grounds it is ultimately the school's responsibility.


But they're 15/16, they are old enough to make a sensible decision and see if they'd be at risk on the sledge. There are people younger who are giving birth to children, and they're supposed to bring them up safely, so why can't these students look after theirselves?


You know these people having children under 16 aren't legally supposed to, don't you?
1 Like #33
Perhaps the teacher should have said the kids knicked his sledge and dropped them in it?
#34
Hmm....some interesting points of view, which is what i thought might be the case after i threw the 'grenade' in for discussion. For my own part, i have mixed feelings on this one. It does seem harsh sacking him for letting a couple of pupils 'test' the sledge - as has been mentioned...they will no doubt partake in waaaaay more dangerous activites out of school, and it's not as if it was luge they were taking part in. However, i would have to admit that whilst it seems the outcome following the events seem riduculous now - how would i feel if it was my child, something tragic had happened and it transpired that the teacher had been advised not to allow it to go ahead? My personal conclusion is that it is a bit like cracking a nut with a sledgehammer - a reprimand would have sufficed, but the sacking is maybe OTT.
#35
thesaint
Syzable
Which is wrong as well. I broke my leg playing football at school........others broke bones playing football/rugby. It's part and parcel of growing up.
If my son broke his leg doing something that a teacher was specifically told not to let my son do, I would be suing him/the school in a hot minute.

i bet the teacher was NOT told NOT to let the kids use a sledge

its because of people like you wanting to sue at the drop of a hat that stupid cases like this come up.
1 Like #36
mumbojumbo
This wasn't the moulded plastic sledge usually seen in the UK. It's a racing sledge with 3 skis designed for speed. You wouldn't expect a teacher to take a group of students skiing without proper preparation, so why think it's ok to take them sledging on one of these? Thousands are injured on ski-slopes each year.


Its a good job that modern kids didnt go to my school, we used to have sledging contests on the edge of the school grounds, a nice steep hill and at the bottom a fairly busy road!, and we used to have teachers v pupils snowball fights, one year I copped for a black eye after getting an ice ball in the mush from the PE teacher, it was accepted there was a risk, but it was well worth it the year after a group of us snowdanced the teacher and got him back bigtime.

Life is all about risk, do you know how dangerous putting your socks on is?, wouldnt seem as risky as say bungee jumping or necking an e, but there are about 100 x more deaths per year due to people putting socks on, its all about what you perceive as risky.
#37
And this is the complete f****** problem with society today.

the risk of litigation, more and more guidelines is castrating teachers' ability to teach.
its bloody ridiculous the things that are now frowned upon in school and this case highlights this.

this sort of thing has the ability to drive home the classroom teaching with practical reinforcement.
Doing learning differently.

Sounds like a terrible head teacher to let it get that far, from what ive read but obviously i dont know all the facts.

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