TEMPERATURE CONTROLS ON RADIATORS? - HotUKDeals
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TEMPERATURE CONTROLS ON RADIATORS?

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I'm having trouble understanding how controlling the temperature on radiators can save you money. Surely if you have a radiator on, be it high or low, it doesn't make any difference because the boile… Read More
shibi din Avatar
8y, 2m agoPosted 8 years, 2 months ago
I'm having trouble understanding how controlling the temperature on radiators can save you money. Surely if you have a radiator on, be it high or low, it doesn't make any difference because the boiler is fired up either way?
I've heard people say it's better to leave radiators on low all day to keep the house at a steady temp. But then the boiler is on all day, eating gas, is that right?
Anyone got any advice on the best way to heat the house?
shibi din Avatar
8y, 2m agoPosted 8 years, 2 months ago
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#1
if the radiators dont get as hot then the boiler does not need to heat the water up as much therefore the boiler is not on as much, saving gas:thumbsup:
#2
ding
if the radiators dont get as hot then the boiler does not need to heat the water up as much therefore the boiler is not on as much, saving gas:thumbsup:


But the boiler is burning gas all the time it is on and if it is switching on and off all day (to keep the temp steady) it is going to use a lot of gas. It's like they say "switch off the radiators in the rooms you are not in". But if you still need the boiler on to heat the two or three rooms you are in, then isn't it burning the same amount of gas to heat two rooms as to heat 5?
#3
if its not heating as much water to pump around the system then the boiler will be on for shorter times each time it fires up, the boiler will be on for a long time to heat the system up from cold to temperature if all the radiators are on and turned up
#4
So if I turn off the radiators upstairs in the day time, but have them on downstairs, then have the heating on all day, it's going to save me money? Then, every evening I turn the rads upstairs back on to heat it up before bedtime and for the morning, then off again for the day. :thinking:

Does anyone out there do this - always switching radiators on and off according to which room you are in?
#5
Leave all your radiators on , but turn your thermostat down a notch and also the temperature on your water. If you imagine a full kettle of cold water, it would take longer to heat up than one that has already boiled and is being kept warm, therefore using less gas to heat. Does this make sense to you?
banned#6
queenlush
Leave all your radiators on , but turn your thermostat down a notch and also the temperature on your water. If you imagine a full kettle of cold water, it would take longer to heat up than one that has already boiled and is being kept warm, therefore using less gas to heat. Does this make sense to you?


Does to me :)
#7
HI,

I was going to ask the same question.
At the moment I set my bolier to Auto.. it comes on at 3pm and shuts off at 10pm - repeat mon-fri.
the thermostat is set to 20

Am i saving money this way? or will I have to keep the bolier on all the time but maybe turn the temp down?
I have all my rads on full.
#8
/bump
1 Like #9
Tanchi
HI,

I was going to ask the same question.
At the moment I set my bolier to Auto.. it comes on at 3pm and shuts off at 10pm - repeat mon-fri.
the thermostat is set to 20

Am i saving money this way? or will I have to keep the bolier on all the time but maybe turn the temp down?
I have all my rads on full.


Sounds reasonable to me. Different houses will need different settings, our termostat is in a very bad location near the front door so we have the thermastat set lower. Controlling the boiler on a thermostat is always preferable to just on/off. Fitting thermostatic control valves on your radiators will also help, it allows each room to have a small degree of temperature control.

Central heating... How does it work?

Just about every customer I visit seems to feel they don't fully understand exactly how their heating system works. This, I think, is due to the lack of an overall user instruction leaflet. There will be a boiler leaflet, a programmer leaflet, thermostat leaflets, but no overview of how they all work together as a system. Here's my attempt to explain it...

An average, ordinary modern domestic heating system has the following major components. (The first five have controls that the user can set or adjust):

Boiler
Programmer
Room thermostat
Hot water cylinder thermostat
Radiators
Hot water cylinder
Diverter valve
pump

And here's how they work together as a whole system...

1) The boiler has two separate functions. To heat your hot water tank and to heat your house.

3) Your programmer contains a clock and two time switches (channels) which turn the hot water and central heating services on and off at pre-selected times of day (or night).

4) Once the system is turned 'on' by the programmer, the boiler will be turned on and off by either the "room thermostat" and the "hot water cylinder thermostat". Each thermostat will turn the boiler on when heat is needed, then turn it off again when it isn't.

5) The "diverter valve" is an electrically operated valve which switches the hot water flowing from the boiler to the radiators or hot water cylinder depending on which thermostat is calling for heat. If both are calling for heat at the same time the valve will assume a 'mid-position', sharing the flow between cylinder and radiators. The diverter valve is sometimes called a 'mid-position valve' for this reason.

And that's it. Easy, eh?

And here are a few other things it is useful for you to know...

1) The water in the boiler is separate from the water that comes from your taps. Heating system water goes around and around the boiler and radiators indefinitely, until it is drained out by a heating engineer for one reason or another... This slows down internal corrosion, and also allows the circulating water to be dosed with inhibitor to completely prevent internal corrosion.

2) The hot water cylinder has a long coil of pipe inside, through which the boiler water flows. This is how the boiler water is kept separate from the domestic water. Heat is transferred through the wall of the pipe into the water in the cylinder.

3) The control knob on the front of your boiler sets the temperature of the water it produces, and this is the temperature your radiators will be when your heating is 'on'. This control also needs to be set so the boiler delivers water at a higher temperature than set on the cylinder thermostat, or the cylinder will never reach the selected temperature and the cylinder thermostat will never shut the boiler down.

4) Modern boilers often have a "pump over-run" facility. This can be puzzling to users getting to know their system. The pump continues to run for a few minutes after the boiler has been turned off. It removes the risk of static water in the heat exchanger being boiled by residual heat immediately after the gas flame is extinguished, and extends heat exchanger life.

This has been a description of a "fully pumped system".

The other common type is the older, and less fuel-efficient "convection hot water, pumped heating" system. The boiler is energised all the time - the boiler thermostat keeping the boiler hot constantly. The hot water cylinder is heated by boiler water circulating by natural convection, and domestic hot water assumes the boiler water temperature. There is a pump fitted to the radiator circuit and the room thermostat simply switches the pump on and off, circulating hot water around the radiators until the room thermostat is satisfied. The hot water cylinder needs to be physically located above the boiler, and heating the hot water takes much longer than a fully pumped system.





Hope that all helps!

(stolen from "Mike the Boilerman")
#10
Thanks pugw$sh - rep given. I was SO impressed while reading this - [SIZE="2"]until I got to the last line and saw you'd copied it. [/SIZE]But I take my hat off to you for finding that info, sometimes google isn't very friendly if you don't know exactly what to ask!!
One last question then, if you don't mind. - I use my heating in the same way Tanchi does, I have it coming on twice a day - 1.5 hours in the morning and then from 4 - 10pm. I have all my rads on. Would it make a difference to the amount of gas used if I turned a couple of those rads off? :thinking:
Thanks.
And thank you too, ding, for your replies. :thumbsup:
banned#11
the trvs dont keep you rads on low, they turn them off when the room has reached the temp you have got your trv set to, so upstairs dont really need to be set as high as downstairs, heat rises
#12
shibi din
Thanks pugw$sh - rep given. I was SO impressed while reading this - [SIZE="2"]until I got to the last line and saw you'd copied it. [/SIZE]But I take my hat off to you for finding that info, sometimes google isn't very friendly if you don't know exactly what to ask!!
One last question then, if you don't mind. - I use my heating in the same way Tanchi does, I have it coming on twice a day - 1.5 hours in the morning and then from 4 - 10pm. I have all my rads on. Would it make a difference to the amount of gas used if I turned a couple of those rads off? :thinking:
Thanks.
And thank you too, ding, for your replies. :thumbsup:


The simple answer is yes, if you do switch off a couple of radiators then you will save gas. Fitting thermostatic valves (TRV's) to the upstairs rooms or unoccupied rooms will switch these off automatically when the correct room temp is reached. All of our bedrooms and bathroom radiators have TRV's fitted but I haven't bothered downstairs as we are open plan. Don't fit a TRV to radiators in the room where the central heating thermostat is fitted, it isn't necessary.

I had to give Mike the Boilerman credit as it is the best description I've found. Unfortunately he couldn't help with my problem of underfloor heating in the conservatory.......................
#13
sassie
the trvs dont keep you rads on low, they turn them off when the room has reached the temp you have got your trv set to, so upstairs dont really need to be set as high as downstairs, heat rises


pugw$sh
The simple answer is yes, if you do switch off a couple of radiators then you will save gas. Fitting thermostatic valves (TRV's) to the upstairs rooms or unoccupied rooms will switch these off automatically when the correct room temp is reached. All of our bedrooms and bathroom radiators have TRV's fitted but I haven't bothered downstairs as we are open plan. Don't fit a TRV to radiators in the room where the central heating thermostat is fitted, it isn't necessary.

I had to give Mike the Boilerman credit as it is the best description I've found. Unfortunately he couldn't help with my problem of underfloor heating in the conservatory.......................


Thank you, you two. I didn't know that the rads switch off when the room gets to the temp they are set at. I've learnt a lot from this thread and Tanchi's thread, and I am going to experiment for a few days, then probably change the way I use my heating. :thumbsup:
#14
TRV's will make your system much more effecient and consequently save you money BUT so will balancing the system correctly. It's logical that if more of the heat is being used by the rads closest to the boiler on the circuit, then the boiler will have to work harder to heat the rads at the end of the run. Balancing is vital on all systems and if you cannot do it accurately with thermometers start by having rads at the beginning of the run from the boiler, set lower and gradually higher as you move along the run. Doing this and you'll find the rads that always took longer to heat up before will get hotter quicker thus spreading your heat around the house more effeciently. People often make the mistake of having all the rads fully open thinking the house will be hotter, it wont.
#15
Excellent thread and really helped me out as I have never had central heating before and wasn't sure of the best way to use it - thanks OP and all subsequent responses

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