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Text / Email scams could leave you out of pocket. What to look out for

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Each week these stories seem to pop up more often. Wales Online reports, very realistic new text message scam that could empty your bank account. (image courtesy Wales Online / This Morning I… Read More
msmyth Avatar
[mod] 1m, 1w agoPosted 1 month, 1 week ago
Each week these stories seem to pop up more often.

Wales Online reports, very realistic new text message scam that could empty your bank account.

http://i.imgur.com/QVQIzq7.png
(image courtesy Wales Online / This Morning ITV)

It looks like a standard text that you might have received several times before from your bank.

Even a consumer expert says it's not the type of message that would necessarily have set alarm bells ringing.

But it cost one woman a £71,000 inheritance from her late father just days before she is due to give birth to her first child.

And her bank says it is not obliged to pay it back as they were not at fault.

What is the scam?

You receive a text message that says it's from your bank. It says there has been suspicious activity on your account. Worryingly, it comes on the same thread on your phone as genuine text messages from your bank because a mobile number is effectively being spoofed. So if you've saved your bank's number in your phone, it will look like it's come from that number.

It says your debit card was recently used and names a store and the amount spent. It then tells you to call a "fraud prevention" number if it's a transaction you do not recognise.

You click on the number to call and there is someone there to answer. In fact, in this victim's case, the call went on for 30 minutes and they discussed her banking details. After the call ends, the fraudsters access your account and drain the funds.

Claire Pearson watched as over £71,000 - an inheritance from her father who passed away last year - was stolen from her account.

Speaking on This Morning, she said: “I received the text, but this wasn’t unusual as I’ve had messages from them before. It said there had been suspicious activity on my account, asked ‘do you recognise this transaction?’, if not call this number.

The Financial Ombudsman said: “Whether someone is able to get their money back following a fraud depends on the individual circumstances of each complaint and whether we find the victim’s bank has made an error which has helped contribute to the loss.”

It said that from April 1, 2015, to February 8, 2017, it received around 6,000 new complaints about disputed transactions.

The Sun also reports, VODAFONE and O2 mobile customers are being warned about scam emails which try and trick them into clicking on dodgy links.

It is likely that these links contain a type of malware which once downloaded, will try and steal your bank details.

http://i.imgur.com/wtJkTKt.jpg
(image courtesy of The Sun / Twitter/ActionFraudUK)

Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre, said that it had received “lots” of reports about fake, personalised O2 and Vodafone emails which likely contain the Emotet banking malware. The links in the emails likely contain Emotet, a type of malware that could steal bank account details by intercepting traffic.

When a person clicks on the link the malware is automatically downloaded.

Once installed, it infects the device and is able to intercept outgoing network traffic in an effort to steal sensitive information from victims.

Recipients of the emails have been flagging them on social media, pointing out their grammatical errors and mistakes.

O2 and Vodafone have also been advising their customers not to click the links.

How can you avoid being scammed?

Never give out personal or financial information on the phone or by email.

Your bank, the police or any other organisation will never ask you for these in full

Never allow someone remote access to your computer following a cold call

Don’t rely on caller ID – numbers can be spoofed by fraudsters to make it look like they’re calling from a trusted number

Your bank, the police or any other company, will never call to ask you to transfer your money out of your account for security reasons

Be wary of all cold calls claiming to be from banks, police, or other trusted organisations – if you have any concerns, call back on an independently verified number

If you have fallen victim to a scam, call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040
msmyth Avatar
[mod] 1m, 1w agoPosted 1 month, 1 week ago
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6 Likes #1
How can you avoid being scammed?...

Google the number rather than rely on an email or text message and make sure your on the companies official website.. It's not exactly hard
5 Likes #2
msmyth

Even a consumer expert says it's not the type of message that would necessarily have set alarm bells ringing.

Some expert, if I received that text I'd immediately think scam.
5 Likes #3
It's a bit rich coming from This Morning, who spend about 90% of their show trying to empty your bank account via phone competitions
1 Like #4
Be wary of all cold calls claiming to be from banks, police, or other trusted organisations – if you have any concerns, call back on an independently verified number

This isn't great advice if you get called by a scammer.

Thanks to our antiquated phone network, on some landlines a call does not actually end until both people hang up.

There are especially nasty scams where they will give out the legitimate phone number, encourage you to hang up, validate it and call back. They will simply stay on the line, listen to you dialing in the number and then pretend to be from that bank. They'll even play a dial tone until they hear you putting the number in for added realism.

Edited By: abigsmurf on Apr 12, 2017 14:24
#5
I got this text knowing id set up unusual activity messages i just replied yes that the details were correct but then realised theyd had the reply go to a mobile number so called my bank with number on back of my card n they put me thru to fraud n they said it was them that sent it so always call number on back of card first never the number on message
#6
Kaz28
I got this text knowing id set up unusual activity messages i just replied yes that the details were correct but then realised theyd had the reply go to a mobile number so called my bank with number on back of my card n they put me thru to fraud n they said it was them that sent it so always call number on back of card first never the number on message
But !! Always do that from a different phone . This is one of the scams , they tell you to ring the number on your card , you hang up ,they don't - Line is still open . You dial the number on your card but are still connected to the last call , albeit to an accomplice of the original caller .

Hope you didn't get scammed - Always call card security on a different phone if you ever get one of these texts/calls.
1 Like #7
How can someone empty an account of £71,000 unless the account holder is completely stupid and gives out the bank card details including the CVV? Even then, surely they cant take out that amount of money oO
#8
rogparki
Kaz28
I got this text knowing id set up unusual activity messages i just replied yes that the details were correct but then realised theyd had the reply go to a mobile number so called my bank with number on back of my card n they put me thru to fraud n they said it was them that sent it so always call number on back of card first never the number on message
But !! Always do that from a different phone . This is one of the scams , they tell you to ring the number on your card , you hang up ,they don't - Line is still open . You dial the number on your card but are still connected to the last call , albeit to an accomplice of the original caller .

Hope you didn't get scammed - Always call card security on a different phone if you ever get one of these texts/calls.
A mobile doesnt work like that does it? My mate called me by accident and I could hear him in the background so I hung up and my phone was instantly available to call someone else. I know a landline can lock out the receiver.
2 Likes #9
"How can you avoid being scammed?

Never give out personal or financial information on the phone or by email. "


Strange advice considering my bank etc asks me some of that info for verification purposes when I call :)
#10
chocci
How can someone empty an account of £71,000 unless the account holder is completely stupid and gives out the bank card details including the CVV? Even then, surely they cant take out that amount of money oO

It doesn't say how they accessed it but if they asked for such details, this would ring alarm bells.

Honestly speaking I would think that text was genuine because I've not known text message scams and it gave a telephone number rather than a link so I would think it's genuine. The time alarm bells would ring for me is if they asked for details that they don't usually ask for, I.e pin, CVC. If the number was automated then they may get the card number because Barclays do ask for that depends what your query is. Btw to block the card they will ask for it :D
And I would fall for it lol so thanks for making me aware op.

Edited By: MR1123 on Apr 12, 2017 16:33
#11
It was to my mobile and i called from my landline coz of this. Im a very aware person of scams etc but this to me was ok as id set the alerts up but still dbl checked on different telephone.
#12
It seems like UK police, ofcom or BT seem powerless in shutting down these numbers. I don't understand how these numbers stay active for weeks or months with nothing done to block them.

Can anyone explain why this is the case?

Who is responsible for getting scamming numbers banned and preventing new ones from opening?
#13
These situations could be controlled easily by making banks check on the individuals who open bank accounts. Finger or retinal prints should be mandatory so that these thieves could be traced. Clear failure on the part of banks

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