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Thermostatic Radiator Valves

lumoruk Avatar
banned6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
So I've got TRVs on all my radiators, apparently there shouldn't be one on the room with a wall thermostat, also some say you shouldn't have one in the bathroom. I'm planning on removing the TRV in my bathroom as I'm putting some nice modern chrome standard valves on.

My question is if the TRV is turned all the way up to 27 degrees does it really matter that it's already on the radiator in the room with a wall thermostat, as it never comes on anyway? Should I bother removing it?
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lumoruk Avatar
banned6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
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1 Like #1
TRV is set at 27 degrees but never comes on? Is that not the cut off temp not the cut in temp in which case that radiator should always be on which is why you shouldn't have it the same room as the stat (unless I misunderstand what you have wrote)
banned#2
greg_68
TRV is set at 27 degrees but never comes on? Is that not the cut off temp not the cut in temp in which case that radiator should always be on which is why you shouldn't have it the same room as the stat (unless I misunderstand what you have wrote)


sorry, the valve never closes so is never used. The room thermostat is usually 18, 20 when the missus is home.
1 Like #3
If the TRV is always going to be above the thermostat setting then I suppose it will not do any harm to leave it in, but if the thermostat is set to higher than the TRV (or if the TRV fails to open) the thermostat will never reach it's setting and therefore the boiler wil never shut down. This could lead to a very warm house and an even hotter gas bill.

Edited By: greg_68 on Dec 09, 2010 13:16
banned#4
greg_68
If the TRV is always going to be above the thermostat setting then I suppose it will not do any harm to leave it in, but if the thermostat is set to higher than the TRV (or if the TRV fails to open) the thermostat will never reach it's setting and therefore the boiler wil never shut down. This could lead to a very warm house and an even hotter gas bill.


cheers and now the bathroom TRV...to go or to stay?
1 Like #5
Don't see why not in the bathroom, found this.


(TRV's) fit on the radiator in place of the existing valve, inside the valve is a wax capsule which expands when heated and stops the flow of water to the radiator. As the wax cools it contracts and lets the water from the boiler flow into the radiator.
You should only fit TRV's to every radiator providing there is a bypass fitted on the system, but even then this is not advisable. As it could increase your fuel bills and increases wear and tear on your boiler. This is because once all the rooms are up to temperature all the TRV's will be closed, but your boiler will still be producing heat at about 78 deg °C.
The pump will still be pushing the heated water around the bypass circuit, even though the house is warm enough. This will cause the boiler to cycle unnecessarily. So it is also advisable to fit a room thermostat. A TRV should not be fitted in the same room as the room thermostat as this can interfere with its operation.
When the room stat is satisfied it will shut the pump & boiler off (providing another circuit is not calling). For best economy just fit TRV's in rooms that are too warm (bedrooms) or in south facing rooms and unused rooms. If you have a condensing boiler then do not fit too many TRV's, usually no more than a third of all radiators, as they will reduce the high efficiency of the boiler (see manufacturer’s instructions)

Edited By: greg_68 on Dec 09, 2010 15:34: ,
banned#6
I have a condensing boiler but all my radiators are TRVs, this is a bloody mine field

On a manufacturers website it says "but if they are on every radiator a bypass must be fitted." haven't a clue about this.

Edited By: lumoruk on Dec 09, 2010 15:37
1 Like #7
Well you may as well drain down and replace some of them when you do the bathroom then. Who fitted them to every rad?

Edited By: greg_68 on Dec 09, 2010 15:41
banned#8
greg_68
Well you may as well drain down and replace some of them when you do the bathroom then.


Just read this in the manual

"4.19 Thermostatic radiator valves
The boiler has a built in automatic bypass valve making
it ideal for use in systems with thermostatic radiator valves
(no separate system bypass is required). For optimum
fuel economy where TRV’s are used they must be
used in conjunction with a boiler control interlock. A programmable
room thermostat or separate timer and
room thermostat will ensure complete boiler shut down
when the heating demand is satisfied. (The radiator in
the room containing the room thermostat should not be
fitted with a TRV)."


no word on the bathroom, hum.
1 Like #9
The only room I have really ever heard that you should not have one is the thermostat room, can't see why any other room would be a problem.
banned#10
greg_68
The only room I have really ever heard that you should not have one is the thermostat room, can't see why any other room would be a problem.


going to look ugly in the bathroom lol damn and cost more too
#11
When I moved in the bathroom was the only one that had one,.have since fitted them everywhere apart from where the room stat is with no problems
banned#12
http://www.bathsrus.com/acatalog/rads_sussex_valve_trvSTR.jpg

http://www.westradiators.co.uk/product-images/W-121-C-TRV-PU.jpg

look how big that thing is lol

Edited By: lumoruk on Dec 09, 2010 16:08
banned#13
reading some other forums, apparently placing towels on the radiator can cause the TRV to have a micro climate turning off before the room is warm enough so going with out it. Funny story from another forum

"However, and Derek seems to have put his finger on this, that the rad
appears to be directional and the pipes are probably on the wrong way
round. The plumbers who installed it seem to have not realised this.
It's not all they got wrong. That and leaving the packaging and the
remains of their lunch under the floor boards."
#14
greg_68
The only room I have really ever heard that you should not have one is the thermostat room, can't see why any other room would be a problem.


our thermostat is in the downstairs hall way, the rad in the hall has no TRV, & we have a towel radiator which doesn't have a TRV either. This is quite a handy forum, might be worth a look in there ultimatehandyman.

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