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Using voucher codes you are not entitled to

£0.00 @ entitled to
Is this allowed and what are the legalities? Read More
teenyweenypeeny Avatar
banned8y, 10m agoPosted 8 years, 10 months ago
Is this allowed and what are the legalities?
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teenyweenypeeny Avatar
banned8y, 10m agoPosted 8 years, 10 months ago
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#1
probably not but who cares

nive avitor
#2
i got away with it so far....:thumbsup:
banned#3
bigbob909
nive avitor


it got removed but it came back again some how.
#4
no its away
banned#5
It depends on the company. The vouchers should be checked before the orders are accepted as part of your offer to treat, However, some companies like Littlewoods, seem to use them to trap buyers into thinking they have bought a good deal and charge your card for the voucher months later.
#6
if you do use a voucher i'd check it up on various other websites before as some companies do them for specific products etc... and like guv was saying, littlewoods can be quite a tricky one to use vouchers for... they tried to reclaim money they lost from a voucher once... they failed though... :)
banned#7
Is a person commiting a crime if they use a voucher code knowing they are not entitled to it. For example some people have found out how to get a discount at game.co.uk that is only intended for virginmobile customers by inputting fake details and refreshing a page.
banned#8
teenyweenypeeny;2516157
Is a person commiting a crime if they use a voucher code knowing they are not entitled to it. For example some people have found out how to get a discount at game.co.uk that is only intended for virginmobile customers by inputting fake details and refreshing a page.


They would have to prove you did it. Would they go to that effort. Would the police really raid your home to gain access to your PC to check this heinous crime?
#9
People type random numbers in to play to claim they have an NUS discount card... but you never hear about people getting in major trouble over if though. (Just a wee example!)
#10
guv
They would have to prove you did it. Would they go to that effort. Would the police really raid your home to gain access to your PC to check this heinous crime?


just like downloading films
banned#11
bigbob909;2516167
just like downloading films


What is?
#12
bigbob909
just like downloading films


you hear more about police raiding homes concerning downloads than you do voucher codes!
banned#13
yimmie;2516173
you hear about police raiding homes concerning downloads than you do voucher codes!


Well you do hear about police raiding homes for piracy yes.... But usually because the people concerned have either uploaded TBs of illegal films, shared similar amounts in torrents, been caught out selling the things and stuff of that nature. It does happen.

I doubt there would be a 4am raid for using a £10 voucher that a company says you shouldn't have.

But who knows in BB Britain!
#14
maybe there keeping a tab on us
banned#15
bigbob909;2516193
maybe there keeping a tab on us


Move along. Nothing to see here!!!:whistling:
#16
:thumbsup: Must be OK. Small piece in the Guardian yesterday, giving the M&S codes for money off, free delivery etc. Now newspapers would NEVER do anythong illegal.....would they?

Seems to be a lot of journalists trawling this site and MSE, to get ideas for all the articles on the credit crunch....thanks to these sites, not sure there is much they can teach most of us here. :p
#17
An advert for one of the newspapers this morning mentioned Martin Lewis as a feature in the newspaper...
banned#18
iglimpse
:thumbsup: Must be OK. Small piece in the Guardian yesterday, giving the M&S codes for money off, free delivery etc. Now newspapers would NEVER do anythong illegal.....would they?

Seems to be a lot of journalists trawling this site and MSE, to get ideas for all the articles on the credit crunch....thanks to these sites, not sure there is much they can teach most of us here. :p


obviously that code would seem to be for everyone then, or maybe just those who bought the Guardian. I wasn't really talking about those codes but the ones where people put in fake details to make it look like they are virgin mobile customer in order to take advantage of the offer. Im all for money saving, otherwise I wouldn't be here, but thats just being deceitful.
#19
bigbob909;2516084
probably not but who cares

nive avitor


teenyweenypeeny;2516088
it got removed but it came back again some how.

Apologies to anyone offended by it, this has been sorted out now.
#20
teenyweenypeeny;2516157
Is a person commiting a crime if they use a voucher code knowing they are not entitled to it. For example some people have found out how to get a discount at game.co.uk that is only intended for virginmobile customers by inputting fake details and refreshing a page.


No, it's up to the company whether they accept the voucher or not - if they don't think you should be using it they shouldn't accept it. If you claim to be someone you're not however and back it up with false documents though that's a different matter entirely.

John
#21
teenyweenypeeny;2516798
obviously that code would seem to be for everyone then, or maybe just those who bought the Guardian. I wasn't really talking about those codes but the ones where people put in fake details to make it look like they are virgin mobile customer in order to take advantage of the offer. Im all for money saving, otherwise I wouldn't be here, but thats just being deceitful.


Nope, the article said it had been sent to some people but it had been tried and seemed OK for everyone to use. It was not promoting it as an offer from M&S. It was a paragraph similar to what we post here.

I would not go as fara as deceiving a company. Just not worth the hassle IMO, or the bother
#22
teenyweenypeeny;2516798
obviously that code would seem to be for everyone then, or maybe just those who bought the Guardian. I wasn't really talking about those codes but the ones where people put in fake details to make it look like they are virgin mobile customer in order to take advantage of the offer. Im all for money saving, otherwise I wouldn't be here, but thats just being deceitful.


Nope, the article said it had been sent to some people but it had been tried and seemed OK for everyone to use. It was not promoting it as an offer from M&S. It was a paragraph similar to what we post here.

I would not go as fara as deceiving a company. Just not worth the hassle IMO, or the bother
banned#23
Johnmcl7;2517549
No, it's up to the company whether they accept the voucher or not - if they don't think you should be using it they shouldn't accept it. If you claim to be someone you're not however and back it up with false documents though that's a different matter entirely.


Agreed.

However Littlewoods accepted coupons, then declined them 3 months latter. I would go as far as an act of deception on their part. Did they gain an advantage in the market place by doing this? Would you have bought the goods at a much higher price than you otherwise needed to pay? Is it fair to bypass distance selling regulations and give the buyer no re-course? Liverpool trading standards seemed to think it was ok! Which to me proves watchdogs ain't all they are cracked up to be!
#24
I think Littlewoods were definitely wrong with what they did, if they didn't want people using the vouchers they should have refused the buyer's offer to buy the product at a reduced cost. I'm surprised Trading Standards backed them up on it.

John
banned#25
It's fraud, simple as that.
The chances of being arrested and charged with it will be practically zero though.
#26
It's not 'fraud' unless you try and prove you work for the company you are trying to use the voucher code from - you cannot be arrested and charged for using a voucher code(!)

John
banned#27
Johnmcl7
It's not 'fraud' unless you try and prove you work for the company you are trying to use the voucher code from - you cannot be arrested and charged for using a voucher code(!)

John


An example
Company gives vouchers for new customers only.
Existing customer tries to deceive company into giving the discount by using a different debit card, different email address, whatever.
That is fraud. You could be arrested for it in theory. In practice it will never happen as the police have far better things to be doing (ie catching people speeding), but it doesn't change the fact it is a crime.
#28
How is that an example since people were not prosecuted for that? It is not a crime, it is up to the company whether they accept your custom or not, nothing to do with being legal or not.

John
banned#29
the issue with the LW fiasco i had is that they waited so long to do anything about it.
banned#30
Johnmcl7
How is that an example since people were not prosecuted for that? It is not a crime, it is up to the company whether they accept your custom or not, nothing to do with being legal or not.

John


I don't understand what you mean? It was a fictional example, of course no one was prosecuted. I said the police wouldn't get involved as it's too petty.

If a child steals a 10p sweet from a shop they won't get prosecuted. If you steal 50 sheets of copier paper from work, or a few pens, there's no way the police will arrest you and charge you for it. , does that mean theft isn't a crime?

EDIT : I presume you are thinking of littlewoods. OK, change the example to the voucher is only valid for over 50's and you give a false date of birth to deceive the company into giving you the discount.
#31
So what use was it as an example exactly? It demonstrates absolutely nothing.

The cases you have just listed are entirely different as they are genuine crimes whereas using a voucher that you're not entitled to is not. It is up to the shop to decide whether to accept your reduced offer or not, there is no crime involved unless you fradulently produce documents to claim you are a member of a company you're not or similar. This is not the case in this discussion however.

John
banned#32
Johnmcl7
So what use was it as an example exactly? It demonstrates absolutely nothing.

The cases you have just listed are entirely different as they are genuine crimes whereas using a voucher that you're not entitled to is not. It is up to the shop to decide whether to accept your reduced offer or not, there is no crime involved unless you fradulently produce documents to claim you are a member of a company you're not or similar. This is not the case in this discussion however.

John


Surely they decide if to give you the discount based on the information you give them? If you deliberately give them false information then you are lying to get a discount. It would have been covered by obtaining by deception a few years ago, now it would be covered by the fraud act.
Why do you have to produce documents to make it a crime?
#33
You're not deliberately giving them false information though, you're just using the voucher code - it's up to the shop to verify whether you should be using the voucher code or not. It is most certainly not obtaining by deception, I've no idea how you've got this idea that it's a criminal act because it most certainly is not. Even the companies claiming back the back is on shaky grounds never mind people being arrested for it(!)

You have to produce documents because otherwise it simply isn't crime - your claim is like saying people should be arrested for stealing cars when they haven't stolen a car. Let's say I find a voucher code which is not labelled, I then use it to purchase a product - according to your argument I could be arrested for this which is complete nonsense. However if the company backs to me and tells me that I have to be a member of McDonalds to use that token and I falsify documents such as a paypacket to look like I work for McDonalds then I have committed a crime due to the fraudulent documents.

It's entirely up to the company to check whether vouchers should be used or not, if they don't then that's entirely their fault and absolutely not a matter of criminal law.

John
banned#34
Let's say I find a voucher code which is not labelled, I then use it to purchase a product - according to your argument I could be arrested for this which is complete nonsense

and if it is labelled and you use it?
#35
It's still up to the retailer to decide if they are going to accept it or not - the worst case in recent times is where Littlewoods claimed back money months after they had taken it. With that in mind, be careful which companies you are dealing with.

John
banned#36
Johnmcl7
You're not deliberately giving them false information though, you're just using the voucher code - it's up to the shop to verify whether you should be using the voucher code or not. It is most certainly not obtaining by deception, I've no idea how you've got this idea that it's a criminal act because it most certainly is not. Even the companies claiming back the back is on shaky grounds never mind people being arrested for it(!)

The thread was specifically about using codes you aren't entitled to, so presumably it's about codes that are labelled and you know you shouldn't be using. The shop verify if you are allowed to use a code by the information you give them, or are you suggesting they should write to the employer to check you work there for example?

You have to produce documents because otherwise it simply isn't crime - your claim is like saying people should be arrested for stealing cars when they haven't stolen a car. Let's say I find a voucher code which is not labelled, I then use it to purchase a product - according to your argument I could be arrested for this which is complete nonsense. However if the company backs to me and tells me that I have to be a member of McDonalds to use that token and I falsify documents such as a paypacket to look like I work for McDonalds then I have committed a crime due to the fraudulent documents.

Again, you are talking about vouchers that you probably don't know if you are entitled to use. I am talking about when you do know you aren't entitled to use them. Using your example, if you knew you had to work for McDonalds and when creating your account you stated you work at McDonalds, then you are deceiving the company. You don't have to provide documents for it to be a crime.

It's entirely up to the company to check whether vouchers should be used or not, if they don't then that's entirely their fault and absolutely not a matter of criminal law.


Which they do, for example, a new customer code can't be used if you login to your existing account and enter it.. When you make an account or order something you agree to the T&C, they usually have something in them to say that the information you provide is true and correct.

If you apply for a credit card/loan etc and say you are working when you are not, or give any false information on the application form, then that is fraud, when people have been arrested for that they don't get found not guilty by using the defence of 'we didn't forge any wage slips, and it's not my fault the company should have checked the information out'.
#37
You're applying logic from a completely different scenario which does not apply here yet again. Applying for credit with false information is nothing like using a voucher not intended for you. It is not a criminal offence to use a voucher that is not intended for you, how on earth have you come to this conclusion? It is entirely up to the shop whether they accept the voucher or not, if they choose to accept it (and thus your offer to purchase) even if you're not supposed to be using the voucher that is the shop's error - it is not deception or fraud. There is nothing legal which means shops must sell items at their full price which you're basically claiming it is because you believe people are breaking the law(!) when they get it for less. Breaching a shop's terms and conditions may open you up to legal action in terms of being sued but again, it is not a criminal action which you could be arrested from. Which is good of course because if the law worked the way you think it does we'd be in a rather scary world where retail outlets ruled Britain.

This is retail purchasing and has nothing to do with criminal law, whether you believe so or not is completely irrelevent. As I said above, even shops claiming back money for vouchers incorrectly used is on very shaky ground so how can the far more extreme measure of it being a criminal action be even considered? Quite simply, it can't.

John
banned#38
Johnmcl7
You're applying logic from a completely different scenario which does not apply here yet again. Applying for credit with false information is nothing like using a voucher not intended for you. It is not a criminal offence to use a voucher that is not intended for you, how on earth have you come to this conclusion? It is entirely up to the shop whether they accept the voucher or not, if they choose to accept it (and thus your offer to purchase) even if you're not supposed to be using the voucher that is the shop's error - it is not deception or fraud.


ok, if you say you are a new customer when you are not, how exactly is that the shops fault? If you say you work for a certain company when you do not, how is that the shops fault?
If you deliberately pretend to be a new customer or lie about your employment so as to recieve a discount, how are you not deceiving the shop?
You seem to think everytime a shop accepts a code they should go to great lengths to validate the code is ok to be used. How exactly can they do that?
Orange for example have company discount codes. They probably process 100's, if not 1000's of these every week (certainly when there is a good deal and the code and deal is posted all over sites like this). Are you seriously suggesting they should have a team sitting there ringing the employer asking if mr xx of xx street works for them? Do you really think the said employer would even go through 1000's of peoples details checking them? Or should they take on trust that people don't lie to them?
#39
It's the shop's fault because they are the ones that take the payment - if they accept the sale legally accepting the customer's offer without doing any sort of verification then that's their problem and not a criminal act by the consumer. The simple fact is that if they couldn't afford to sell it at that price they wouldn't, it's up to them to properly regulate their vouchers and offers and not a job of the police as you mistakenly believe.

If a voucher is being abused they'll normally be forced to simply withdraw it because in many cases they won't take steps to attempt to verify if people are meant to be using it or not. I'm not saying shop's have to validate the codes, however what I'm saying is if they don't that's entirely their fault and not a criminal act. If they are not prepared to try and verify codes nor regulate usage then that's quite simply their loss. In this day and age with voucher codes easily spreading widely - Threshers are probably more aware of this than anyone else as their secret 40% off voucher spread wildly however there was no criminal action even against those that started spreading it which if it had been an option Threshers may well have considered. As it wasn't an option at all because using the voucher is not breaking the law, instead they simply have to be more careful with their vouchers in the future.

You should be glad the world doesn't work the way you believe, if the police could be involved in all this then the shops would take the opportunity as many of them have lost a lot of money on incorrectly used voucher codes which have been spread by individuals. The reality is there's little they can do about it, not in criminal law and not even in other areas either - Littlewoods were stretched just to claim the money back.

John
banned#40
we could be here all day lol

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