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What are your views on the news that Illegal downloaders 'face UK ban'

geoneo123 Avatar
8y, 9m agoPosted 8 years, 9 months ago
I would like to know what people think of this.

People in the UK who go online and illegally download music and films may have their internet access cut under plans the government is considering.

A draft consultation suggests internet service providers would be required to take action over users who access pirated material via their accounts.

But the government is stressing that plans are at an early stage and it is still working on final proposals.

Six million people a year are estimated to download files illegally in the UK.

Music and film companies say that the illegal downloads cost them millions of pounds in lost revenues.

The government proposals were first reported by the Times newspaper.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport said that early drafts of the document had been circulated among stakeholders.

"The content and proposals for the strategy have been significantly developed since then and a comprehensive plan to bolster the UK's creative industries will be published shortly," it added.

"We will not comment on the content of the leaked document."

Voluntary scheme

The Times suggested that broadband firms which failed to enforce the rules could be prosecuted, and the details of customers suspected of making illegal downloads made available to the courts.

According to the Times, the draft paper states: "We will move to legislate to require internet service providers to take action on illegal file sharing."

Source: BBC News
geoneo123 Avatar
8y, 9m agoPosted 8 years, 9 months ago
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#1
Any chance of the full story?
#2
what do they face? uk ban from what? the cinema, country?
#3
People in the UK who go online and illegally download music and films may have their internet access cut under plans the government is considering.

A draft consultation suggests internet service providers would be required to take action over users who access pirated material via their accounts.

But the government is stressing that plans are at an early stage and it is still working on final proposals.

Six million people a year are estimated to download files illegally in the UK.

Music and film companies say that the illegal downloads cost them millions of pounds in lost revenues.
#4
All of this proposed legislation is being banded around for one reason - 'Digital Downloads',

Blu Ray will most likley be the last physical media you buy over the counter, digital downloads will be the next step. There are tow things holding this back - firstly Download speeds which are not up to it in the UK yet, and secondly piracy, there is no way large corporations are going to allow Torrent sites to continue whilst they are offering a similar but paying service.

Clampdowns on torrent and free music sites will no doubt increase in the next few years, in fact they have begun already.
#5
it'll never happen as it will cost to much to put the neccesary software in to place to detect this sort of thing, who's going to pay for that? the goverment?
#6
I'm at uni... all my CDs are at home, I used to lug them too and thro, but now I leave them at home. Recently I've been downloading some of the albums that I already own. There is 100% nothing wrong with this as you are allowed 2 back up copies of any album you own... but the goverment don't know that I own them... if they banned me for that... there would be some long fight on my hands.

The ban is an internet ban... you will get diconnected and blacklisted. Kinda harsh but when they start doing it, people will sit up and take note.
#7
souljacker
it'll never happen as it will cost to much to put the neccesary software in to place to detect this sort of thing, who's going to pay for that? the goverment?




ISP's already have the technology to monitor internet use, in France the government is already pushing the ISP's into monitoring illegal downloads and I suspect a similar system will be brought into the UK.
#8
Music and film companies say that the illegal downloads cost them millions of pounds in lost revenues.



i love that, it's not the bands or the writers who are getting uppety, it's the capitalist pigdogs
#9
I think it works on a warning system

3 strikes and your out - well on the blacklist
#10
just more government dictatorship if they can't tax it then they ban it.
this country is getting worse by the day with there petty rules and taxes on everything that moves they will be taxing us for farting next saying that we are polluting the atmosphere and creating global warming.
#11
i only really use the internet for downloads, if they banned me, i could still carry on using the internet for legal things by going to libraries/wi fi spots etc
#12
baccyman
just more government dictatorship if they can't tax it then they ban it.
this country is getting worse by the day with there petty rules and taxes on everything that moves they will be taxing us for farting next saying that we are polluting the atmosphere and creating global warming.


i think i heard somewhere that 1/3 of our methane emissions (which do contribute to global warming or ozone depletion or something) come from cow burps...
#13
baccyman
just more government dictatorship if they can't tax it then they ban it.
this country is getting worse by the day with there petty rules and taxes on everything that moves they will be taxing us for farting next saying that we are polluting the atmosphere and creating global warming.



Copyright theft is illegal, and has been for many years - this is hardly something new and they are not banning it, it already is banned.
#14
geoneo123
I think it works on a warning system

3 strikes and your out - well on the blacklist


Yeh it is... you don't just get home one day to find your internet doesn't work.
#15
I think it's more to do with seeding/uploading than anything else.

They can't possibly go for everyone who downloads as their is simply to much data. More than likely the companies dealing with piracy on behalf of these media giants will simply take note of who is uploading a lot of stuff then ask the ISP's for info data. I doubt the ISP's will go for this as branding six million paying customers criminals and threatening to cut off their internet and hand over details to third parties would loose them money and may even get them sued.

Plus there is always a way around this stuff.

EDIT:
For those wagging fingers cliaming "copyright theft is illegal" so is recording TV or Radio. Granted it's bad for the film companies if a movie is leaked that is on the cinema, i'll give you that. But as far as other media it's simply that the companies have refused to move with the times and have found themselves scrabbling to hold on to dying methods of business rather than adapting.
#16
gav989
i think i heard somewhere that 1/3 of our methane emissions (which do contribute to global warming or ozone depletion or something) come from cow burps...


Hahaha you must have learned that from somebody really polite...
I think you'll find its cow farts not burps...
banned#17
It is only a draft consultation and will never get through parliament. ISPs cant detect what you are downloading anyway, they can just detect your usage.

Its easy to become anonymous anyway. hell, I can even use my neighbours bandwidth as he hasnt setup any security on it - lol
#18
I find it interesting that the government are putting more pressure on broadband firms (ISP) to prevent and block music/film downloads rather than using this approach to prevent child pornography on the web.

This just goes to show that the motivating factor behind this is money rather than the wellbeing of society as a whole etc.

These large companies that are complaining are still making millions in profit year in year out. They state that illegal downloads will prevent them from financing new artists however websites such as myspace have highlighted that you dont necessarily need a big company behind you to get your music noticed and getting an album together to sell.

These companies have been overcharging customers for years and I personally have little sympathy for them if their profits are in decline
#19
csiman
It is only a draft consultation and will never get through parliament. ISPs cant detect what you are downloading anyway, they can just detect your usage.

Its easy to become anonymous anyway. hell, I can even use my neighbours bandwidth as he hasnt setup any security on it - lol


Recent press from france says that ISP's can monitor usage, it's new technology but obvously governments can see that it could prevent copyright theft.
#20
"Ninety-five percent of the methane released by cows comes out through the mouth"

http://www.allaboutfeed.net/news/id102-36917/sweden_studies_methane_from_cow_burps.html

that's a good point ungreat, if everyone gets banned then all the ip companies will die out. we should encourage these downloads so that the companies would have to choose between their own careers/organisations/profits and this policy, i think i know which would win...
#21
roryk83
I find it interesting that the government are putting more pressure on broadband firms (ISP) to prevent and block music/film downloads rather than using this approach to prevent child pornography on the web.

This just goes to show that the motivating factor behind this is money rather than the wellbeing of society as a whole etc.

These large companies that are complaining are still making millions in profit year in year out. They state that illegal downloads will prevent them from financing new artists however websites such as myspace have highlighted that you dont necessarily need a big company behind you to get your music noticed and getting an album together to sell.

These companies have been overcharging customers for years and I personally have little sympathy for them if their profits are in decline


I have no doubt that the government and ISP's are doing this in secret so as not to tip off the scumbags.

As far as music companies, I lost all sympathy for them when they sued and won against CDWOW for selling CD's for an affordable price. These were not illegal copies but simply CD's meant for the Asian market that CDWOW supplied to customers in the UK, and for this they lost to the tune of £60 million. :x
1 Like #22
Here's an interesting take on the whole matter.....

------

There’s been a lot of buzz about a story The London Times ran this morning under the headline “Internet users could be banned over illegal downloads,” which also appeared on the BBC website under the even more alarming headline “Illegal downloaders ‘face UK ban.” Time to get a couple of things straight.

The Times says “people who illegally download films and music will be cut off from the internet under new legislative proposals to be unveiled next week.” Actually, this story is complete balderdash. But the fact that this nutty proposal is getting anywhere at all illustrates how ignorant the powers that be are about downloading.

Let’s get a couple of things straight –

1. This proposal was a draft consultation green paper, defined as “a proposal without any commitment to action.” The government receives many of these on a daily basis. They are like junk mail at Number 10 Downing Street. The Prime Minister’s toilet paper is more important than most green papers, and both are usually filed in the same place.

2. This proposal is totally and completely unworkable in the real world. ISPs will not accept liability for the contents of packets (nor should they), and it would be impossible for them to open and check if every single download and upload was legal or not without the entire Internet grinding to halt. This isn’t in the best interests of the government, the ISPs or the voters. Banning customers and exposing yourself to billions in liability isn’t a good business strategy. Criminalizing six million citizens and inconveniencing the rest is not a vote winner.

3. It would be impossible to tell the difference between illegal downloading and legal activities such as downloading software patches, using torrents to share stuff legally, playing online video games, using VoIP, photo sharing, telecommuting, and many others. The resistance from the private sector would be as strong as it would from the general public.

4. The very idea of this goes against the ruling of the European Court, which says EU member states are not obligated to disclose personal information about suspected file sharers. It would also fly in the face of Article 10 of the European freedom of expression laws, which gives every European the “freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority and regardless of frontiers.”

5. WiFi piggybacking and encrypted packets make it impossible to tell who is downloading what in the first place. These techniques are only getting more sophisticated, while for the most part, the content industries collectively remain as dumb as a box of hair.

So in summary:

Insert Toilet Flushing Sound FX Here

This idea makes as much sense as trying to ban people from singing ‘Happy Birthday’ to each other over the telephone network, or burning down libraries to protect the publishing industry. But what’s frightening about such ideas is that they are still taken seriously all over the world by powerful decision makers in government and industry who have absolutely no clue about how the Internet actually works, or the damage such laws could do to democracy.

Before there is any more discussion about this, the music and film companies need to definitively prove illegal downloads cost them millions of dollars in lost revenues. CD sales are falling because nobody uses them anymore, and Hollywood is in rude health despite the pirates. There should be no more talk about changing laws and spending tax payer’s money on this ‘problem’ until someone proves there really is one.

Furthermore, if there is a problem, tax payers shouldn’t have to pony up in the first place. The content industries need to stop braying at governments to protect inefficient business models and look at the real solution that’s been staring them in the face for ten years.

For those who are interested, my book: “The Pirate’s Dilemma: How Youth Culture Is Reinventing Capitalism” is out now through Free Press, , and probably soon on a BitTorrent tracker near you ;).
#23
wow Shengis!

me likey!
#24
It will make no difference the next line of downloading will be encrypted VPNs and IPSEC technology so they won't be able to monitor encryted traffic.
banned#25
Shengis;1617777
Here's an interesting take on the whole matter.....

------

There’s been a lot of buzz about a story The London Times ran this morning under the headline “Internet users could be banned over illegal downloads,” which also appeared on the BBC website under the even more alarming headline “Illegal downloaders ‘face UK ban.” Time to get a couple of things straight.

The Times says “people who illegally download films and music will be cut off from the internet under new legislative proposals to be unveiled next week.” Actually, this story is complete balderdash. But the fact that this nutty proposal is getting anywhere at all illustrates how ignorant the powers that be are about downloading.

Let’s get a couple of things straight –

1. This proposal was a draft consultation green paper, defined as “a proposal without any commitment to action.” The government receives many of these on a daily basis. They are like junk mail at Number 10 Downing Street. The Prime Minister’s toilet paper is more important than most green papers, and both are usually filed in the same place.

2. This proposal is totally and completely unworkable in the real world. ISPs will not accept liability for the contents of packets (nor should they), and it would be impossible for them to open and check if every single download and upload was legal or not without the entire Internet grinding to halt. This isn’t in the best interests of the government, the ISPs or the voters. Banning customers and exposing yourself to billions in liability isn’t a good business strategy. Criminalizing six million citizens and inconveniencing the rest is not a vote winner.

3. It would be impossible to tell the difference between illegal downloading and legal activities such as downloading software patches, using torrents to share stuff legally, playing online video games, using VoIP, photo sharing, telecommuting, and many others. The resistance from the private sector would be as strong as it would from the general public.

4. The very idea of this goes against the ruling of the European Court, which says EU member states are not obligated to disclose personal information about suspected file sharers. It would also fly in the face of Article 10 of the European freedom of expression laws, which gives every European the “freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority and regardless of frontiers.”

5. WiFi piggybacking and encrypted packets make it impossible to tell who is downloading what in the first place. These techniques are only getting more sophisticated, while for the most part, the content industries collectively remain as dumb as a box of hair.

So in summary:

Insert Toilet Flushing Sound FX Here

This idea makes as much sense as trying to ban people from singing ‘Happy Birthday’ to each other over the telephone network, or burning down libraries to protect the publishing industry. But what’s frightening about such ideas is that they are still taken seriously all over the world by powerful decision makers in government and industry who have absolutely no clue about how the Internet actually works, or the damage such laws could do to democracy.

Before there is any more discussion about this, the music and film companies need to definitively prove illegal downloads cost them millions of dollars in lost revenues. CD sales are falling because nobody uses them anymore, and Hollywood is in rude health despite the pirates. There should be no more talk about changing laws and spending tax payer’s money on this ‘problem’ until someone proves there really is one.

Furthermore, if there is a problem, tax payers shouldn’t have to pony up in the first place. The content industries need to stop braying at governments to protect inefficient business models and look at the real solution that’s been staring them in the face for ten years.

For those who are interested, my book: “The Pirate’s Dilemma: How Youth Culture Is Reinventing Capitalism” is out now through Free Press, , and probably soon on a BitTorrent tracker near you ;).

Well said! :-D
#26
Just to point out that wasn't MY comment, just something I found the other day when doing some research into all this ;-)

But I do agree with it, obviously :lol:
#27
Bring It On!
#28
By the way, if anybody wants a good read on torents, copyright etc, head over here : http://torrentfreak.com/

Note, this is NOT a torrent site/tracker it's a news commentary site that basically ridicules the industry every time they screw up.
banned#29
Ritchie 2
Copyright theft is illegal, and has been for many years - this is hardly something new and they are not banning it, it already is banned.


It isn't a crime though, the copyright owner could only, at best, take you to a civil court to recover damages for downloading. As far as I am aware, this has yet to happen in the UK. Downloading a copyrighted file without the owners permission isn't banned either.
This is like saying someone who has bad credit, missed a couple of payments or has a CCJ should be banned from having money.

Unless they make downloading a criminal offence I can't see how this would be in any way workable. More so, it shouldn't be up to the goverment to force us to obey things that belong in civil courts.
#30
Another thought for you all. If the government do pass a bill to make intellectual copyright theft a criminal offence, then even QUOTING somebody on a board like this one COULD land you in criminal court, as the original poster hold intellectual rights on whatever they write. Sounds extreme? Yes it is, but however unlikely, it could happen if this bill were passed.

I know the above sounds like scaremongering BS but its a fact that our rights to any form of freedom, whether on the net or itrw are being eroded on a daily basis by idiots who are fed BS by other idiots with hidden (or not so hidden) agendas.
#31
This will never happen, ban everybody thats downloading , who is gonna pay a monthly sub scription for broadbans.

If we only email we could go back to 64kb and pay nothingb out at all, the secondary income from online shopping,dating and all other activities far outweighs what the music and film industry loses
Then there are the sales of blank dvd and cds(worth absolutely millions), dvd cases, photo paper, dvd players, dvd recorders, high end laptops, high end pcs.

Without all this thousands and thousands of jobs would be lost.

The problem the film and music industry has is not new, people do not continue playing a new song or a new film for much more than 30days until the new one comes out. Who wants to pay £ 7 for a cd or £ 10 for a dvd to use for such a short time.

Make them time time limited and a £ 1 a shot and see what happens. Does it really matter if tom cruise does not get another $30 million dollars.

If the govt of this country are seriously going to start scanning what we are do, you can guarantee things are gonna die as we know it and crawl underground.
#32
Ritchie 2
Copyright theft is illegal, and has been for many years - this is hardly something new and they are not banning it, it already is banned.


that was my point they could not tax downloads so it was banned.
#33
quoting somebody on a board like this does not come into it, unless you specifically had it copyrighted.
This can be sorted by the owners of the board allowing all work on its board to be used.

If you did not agree you wouldnt post
#34
pcfairs
quoting somebody on a board like this does not come into it, unless you specifically had it copyrighted.
This can be sorted by the owners of the board allowing all work on its board to be used.

If you did not agree you wouldnt post


Don't bet on it. I read a story about 6 months ago (maybe longer) about the 'new internet'. A redesigned web with globally agreed rules and regulations, including copyright. Basically the owners of a website would be fully accountable for the users actions in all cases. T&C's are not above the law and neither are disclaimers. It's all speculation of course, but who knows for sure till it happens?
banned#35
pcfairs
quoting somebody on a board like this does not come into it, unless you specifically had it copyrighted.
This can be sorted by the owners of the board allowing all work on its board to be used.

If you did not agree you wouldnt post


You don't have to copyright anything do you? I thought it was an assumed right for an original work?
How do you go about copyrighting something?

I agree it is easily sorted though
banned#36
Shortly-********.Nobody will ban you.
#37
I think this whole thing is just scare stories to frighten a few teenagers into not downloading. ©

Hold alt and type 0169 ©
Hold alt and type 0153
Hold alt and type 0174 ®

[SIZE="1"][FONT="Arial Narrow"]This post is copywritten and any attempt to copy or quote it will result in your computer coming alive and raping you[/FONT][/SIZE].
#38
Ungreat
I think this whole thing is just scare stories to frighten a few teenagers into not downloading. ©

Hold alt and type 0169 ©
Hold alt and type 0153
Hold alt and type 0174 ®

[SIZE="1"][FONT="Arial Narrow"]This post is copywritten and any attempt to copy or quote it will result in your computer coming alive and raping you[/FONT][/SIZE].


Test....
#39
Nope, obviously your coming alive and raping protection system isn't compatible with XP Pro, lets hope the government implement your solution ;-) :lol:
#40
Shengis
Nope, obviously your coming alive and raping protection system isn't compatible with XP Pro, lets hope the government implement your solution ;-) :lol:


What not even some inappropriate touching, you install a fancy new protection system and doesn't even do the simple unspeakable acts listed on the box. :roll:

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