what difference does HZ make on TV's is a 50HZ 1080p LED worse picture that a 200HZ 1080P LCD ? - HotUKDeals
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what difference does HZ make on TV's is a 50HZ 1080p LED worse picture that a 200HZ 1080P LCD ?

£0.00 @
My TV went POP so Dixons are replacing it with another. so i am looking about and have seen a couple that i could get. they are.. Sharp Aquos LC46LE600E 46" Full HD LED backlit TV @ £749.99 Or LG 47L… Read More
lewt Avatar
banned7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
My TV went POP so Dixons are replacing it with another. so i am looking about and have seen a couple that i could get. they are..
Sharp Aquos LC46LE600E 46" Full HD LED backlit TV @ £749.99
Or
LG 47LH5000 47" 1080p LCD TV @ £697.99

Ideally we would like the samsung 46" LED or the LG 47" LED however these are both over £1K so they are out. I will post links in the second post.

Is there really a big difference on the HZ ?
lewt Avatar
banned7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
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#2
The difference is not how sharp the picture is or how high quality it is, but how smooth everything is in terms of movement. Go into a store and find a 50Hz and 100Hz tv next to one another. You will notice the difference, and chances are the 50Hz tv will look incredibly jerky in comparison to the 100Hz tv. It's a difference that you probably won't appreciate until you see it for yourself (like a lot of technology advances these days), but it is very noticeable nonetheless.
banned#3
Smoother image, that subtly makes a big difference although you may not notice it. Especially noticeable in games and fast paced sports though
#4
personally id go with a lg or samsung if I was getting led, higher hz make the picture movement smoother but can also look terrible on some channels most led tvs come with 100hz or 200hz to sum it up I think the hz do make a difference but a 50hz/60hz telly is more value for money as the picture quality is just as good but cheaper .
#5
I don't understand Hz either... I paid £700 for a TV that has 100hz, & you get the best picture when you switch the 100hz off in the settings! This is backed up by all the reviews online & AVforums.
#6
Also with a TV over 100Hz you can use it as a 3D TV if you have the other tech to go with it.
#7
http://www.gerardmaas.net/techniques/stroboscopic-flash/stroboscopic-hertz-explained
The more often you picture is refreshed the more accurately it will show movement. This is particularly for fast moving action in games or film.
The fact that the actual picture is not as good is probably due to the fact the technology is pushing the present limits of the underlying technology.
#8
The 50hz 100hz thing is a throwback to CRTVs where some people were sensitive to flicker at 50hz ,LCD TVs use pixels which are constantly on so there is no flicker, In order to make up the numbers the TV creates an inbetween image to fill in the gaps,How good it does this depends on how much you want to spend, Very few TVs under £1000 do a good job and most actually make the picture worse,
#9
a 200hz tv will blow a 50hz tv outta the water when side by side on the same content, something fast moving like sports etc.

A 200hz tv is normally gonna have better software and components inside also, i.e you wont find a cheap 200hz tv you will need to pay more for one as its a more premium product.
#10
dcx_badass
No you can't, you need 120hz for a start but most are going to be 240hz. And all the current high hz TVs are poor, they can't take an input at that level which is needed for 3D TV, they can just convert the picture by guessing the middle frame which is why it often looks poor.


...120hz is 100hz

its double the original frame rate, in america their original frame rate is ntsc @ 60 hz so double it takes it to 120.

europe the content is PAL @ 50hz so double the rate is 100hz

100hz here = 120hz in the US
200hz here = 240hz in the US

but I think your right on the 3d aspect the tvs i have seen do seem to have 200 (240hz) as standard
banned#11
ok guys so from what you are saying is that the LG above is a really good deal and the LED's that are about which most i have seen only have 100Hz. So really the fact they are paper thin is all they have going for them ??
#12
Chuckles1001
Also with a TV over 100Hz you can use it as a 3D TV if you have the other tech to go with it.


dcx_badass
No you can't, you need 120hz for a start but most are going to be 240hz. And all the current high hz TVs are poor, they can't take an input at that level which is needed for 3D TV, they can just convert the picture by guessing the middle frame which is why it often looks poor.


Some one who does not read, as i said "A TV OVER 100Hz.." Can you show me a TV that is over 100Hz but under 120Mz???? Please show me!! lol

Also on a CRT you only need 100Hz not OVER 100hz look here http://www.nvidia.com/object/3D_Vision_Requirements.html

I will not say anything about what you said about most are going to be 240Hz as you said as you are correct, i was stating a minimum, you was just being a plum
banned#13
Think i am going to go for the 40" Samsung which only mean after cashback that i add £200 on top of what i have now.
#14
No TV atm is 3d unless stated you cant just use a 100hz/120hz tv for 3d......

but i find that 100/120hz tvs make the picture jerkier as they are processing the image more.
#15
what tv is better:
samsung 42" plasma 100hz or
sony 40" lcd 50 hz
#16
More Hz is BETTER 2 Techniques used to make a good picture

1 Motion interpolation (Wikipedia)

is used in various display devices such as HDTVs and video players, aimed at alleviating the video artifacts introduced by framerate conversions in fixed-framerate displays such as LCD TVs. Films are recorded at a frame rate of 24 frames per second (frame/s) and television is typically filmed at 25, 50, 30 or 60 frames per second (the first two being PAL, the other two from NTSC). Normally, when a fixed framerate display such as an LCD screen is used to display a video source whose framerate is less than that of the screen, frames are often simply duplicated as necessary until the timing of the video is matched to that of the screen, which introduces a visual artifact known as judder, perceived as "jumpiness" in the picture. Motion interpolation intends to remedy this by generating intermediate frames that make animation more fluid.

While common, not all 120 Hz HDTVs include a motion interpolation feature. Also, anti judder technology is not the same as motion blur reducing technology, but is frequently lumped together with it.[1]

The commercial name given to motion interpolation technology varies across manufacturers, as does its implementation.

2. BFI (hdtvorg.co.uk)

BFI/DFI (black frame, dark frame interpolation) to insert the extra frames.

Some current 100Hz/200Hz LCD TV's insert extra frames using advanced algorithms to calculate with some degree of precision what the picture content of these frames should be (based on the preceding and subsequent frames).

BFI/DFI technology inserts very short black frames between the original picture frames, a method utilizing the principle that the human eye does not 'forget' light instantly. By inserting these very short black images between frames, the human eye is constantly 'reset' (effectively transposing the image onto the black frame), improving the perception of screen response time.



Edited By: Digit10101 on Dec 26, 2010 04:58
banned#17
btw, did read that you should revert back to 50hz for gaming to avoid motion blur
#18
I've just bought a Bush 50" led hd 1080p TV , why is my picture so bad everything looks kind of out of focus/blurry plz help ...
banned#19
keith1298
I've just bought a Bush 50" led hd 1080p TV , why is my picture so bad everything looks kind of out of focus/blurry plz help ...

probably < 50Hz. oO
#20
keith1298
I've just bought a Bush 50" led hd 1080p TV , why is my picture so bad everything looks kind of out of focus/blurry plz help ...

The clue is in the 'Bush 5 inch' bit.
#21
A 5" bush is not a bonny sight.
1 Like #22
gmdlogan
A 5" bush is not a bonny sight.

X)

I won't edit it and spoil your joke ;)
#23
deeky
gmdlogan
A 5" bush is not a bonny sight.

X)

I won't edit it and spoil your joke ;)

You'd be able to plait the ****!
#24
gmdlogan
deeky
gmdlogan
A 5" bush is not a bonny sight.

X)

I won't edit it and spoil your joke ;)

You'd be able to plait the ****!

Googling X)
#25
Just upgraded from a Toshiba 42" 720p to a Samsung 55" H6700, I'm noticing a lot of judder/flicker on sports whereas i had none before. Is it because it's more noticeable at 1080p or has technology actually got worse?!
#26
[quote=fungus]Just upgraded from a Toshiba 42" 720p to a Samsung 55" H6700, I'm noticing a lot of judder/flicker on sports whereas i had none before. Is it because it's more noticeable at 1080p or has technology actually got worse?![/quote?]

A lot of the new TV have this problem. Because of all the picture smoothen in etc. However most TVS also have a sport mode or similar whereby you turn off motion blur and other processing tasks which helps reduce blur.

Edited By: master10 on Feb 01, 2015 01:32

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