What part of my computer needs upgrading or is it cheaper to get a new pc? - HotUKDeals
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What part of my computer needs upgrading or is it cheaper to get a new pc?

MANJ_007 Avatar
6y, 5m agoPosted 6 years, 5 months ago
I have not long ago purchased a high def video camera, i transferred the files onto my computer and the video is really jumpy when i try and play it back, the sound is good though! I just copied the files onto a dvd and popped it in the ps3 and it works perfectly. I really wanted to edit it and not just copy files as they were recorded.

Do i need a faster processor or more RAM (I think ive got 3gb already) The pc is about 4 years old.

I can get exact spec of pc after work if that helps.

Thanks
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MANJ_007 Avatar
6y, 5m agoPosted 6 years, 5 months ago
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1 Like #1
A computer is a mix of components that all work together to define its "speed"

These include the speed of the CPU (and the amount of cache), the speed of the memory, the speed of the BUS (the speed the data moves around the computer), the speed of the hard disk (and its interface) and so on.

Often upgrading one component will not improve the speed that much as the other components are still slow.

So, for example, you could put a faster CPU in, but if the BUS is still slow (the data moving round the computer) then it will not go much faster.

Another example. Hard disks used to connect to the computer via an IDE connection, but over the last few years they now connect via a SATA connection, which is much faster (the speed data is "read" off the hard disk and passed via the BUS to the CPU). So if your computer is still IDE you are "stuck" with the slower hard disk interface and will still get the stuttering.

Over the last four years the speed of everything has gone up (CPUs, memory, bus speeds, hard disk speeds etc).

So to be honest with a four year old PC you are probably best getting a new one.

You can still keep the old PC as a spare or family PC. It will be fine for email, internet, homework etc, just not for video editing and other functions that require a powerful PC.
1 Like #2
You could possibly by a barebones PC from somewhere like Scan or Ebuyer for example, and then just modify the spec to your requirements for what you're running, and just keep your existing monitor, keyboard and mouse and anything else that's useful.
1 Like #3
your best off posting full specs so we can see what you have already
#4
coerce86
your best off posting full specs so we can see what you have already


Will do later this evening after the match

FTCom
You could possibly by a barebones PC from somewhere like Scan or Ebuyer for example, and then just modify the spec to your requirements for what you're running, and just keep your existing monitor, keyboard and mouse and anything else that's useful.


Wouldn't have a clue how to change things - i like the easy life and let the people who know what they are doing do their job

guilbert53
A computer is a mix of components that all work together to define its "speed"

These include the speed of the CPU (and the amount of cache), the speed of the memory, the speed of the BUS (the speed the data moves around the computer), the speed of the hard disk (and its interface) and so on.

Often upgrading one component will not improve the speed that much as the other components are still slow.

So, for example, you could put a faster CPU in, but if the BUS is still slow (the data moving round the computer) then it will not go much faster.

Another example. Hard disks used to connect to the computer via an IDE connection, but over the last few years they now connect via a SATA connection, which is much faster (the speed data is "read" off the hard disk and passed via the BUS to the CPU). So if your computer is still IDE you are "stuck" with the slower hard disk interface and will still get the stuttering.

Over the last four years the speed of everything has gone up (CPUs, memory, bus speeds, hard disk speeds etc).

So to be honest with a four year old PC you are probably best getting a new one.

You can still keep the old PC as a spare or family PC. It will be fine for email, internet, homework etc, just not for video editing and other functions that require a powerful PC.


I thought so, was trying to avoid spending more money, spent quite a bit over the last month - mrs will not be happy with me.

Leaving rep now for all. Thanks
#5
Out of interest, what software did you use to play back your video? Some video/media players can be more efficient than others.
#6
inside101
Out of interest, what software did you use to play back your video? Some video/media players can be more efficient than others.


tried windows media player and media player classic with codecs added. Also tried on my laptop and same happened. Laptop is HP Pavilion dv9000
#7
Which video camera is it? If you're recording in AVCHD format then you're best to convert to another format for playback, it's one of the downsides of the format. I have a decent core i7 desktop PC but still transcode all my AVCHD footage.

John
#8
Johnmcl7
Which video camera is it? If you're recording in AVCHD format then you're best to convert to another format for playback, it's one of the downsides of the format. I have a decent core i7 desktop PC but still transcode all my AVCHD footage.

John


Hi, its a Sony HDR-XR155, from memory I think it records the file as .MTS

Probably sounds silly but what is AVCHD and how do I transcode it?
#9
Are you editing 720p or 1080p footage?

I hear Blender (freeware) has the ability to edit in low quality then export in full resolution.
#10
guilbert53;8897336
A computer is a mix of components that all work together to define its "speed"

These include the speed of the CPU (and the amount of cache), the speed of the memory, the speed of the BUS (the speed the data moves around the computer), the speed of the hard disk (and its interface) and so on.

Often upgrading one component will not improve the speed that much as the other components are still slow.

So, for example, you could put a faster CPU in, but if the BUS is still slow (the data moving round the computer) then it will not go much faster.

Another example. Hard disks used to connect to the computer via an IDE connection, but over the last few years they now connect via a SATA connection, which is much faster (the speed data is "read" off the hard disk and passed via the BUS to the CPU). So if your computer is still IDE you are "stuck" with the slower hard disk interface and will still get the stuttering.

Over the last four years the speed of everything has gone up (CPUs, memory, bus speeds, hard disk speeds etc).

So to be honest with a four year old PC you are probably best getting a new one.

You can still keep the old PC as a spare or family PC. It will be fine for email, internet, homework etc, just not for video editing and other functions that require a powerful PC.

I agree with the conclusion and much of what is said but SATA is only theoretically faster than IDE - the limiter is really the speed of the hard drive and not the interface - the same is true of many of the BUS interfaces referred to.
If you really want to upgrade your existing machine, for HD video, you will want 3Gb or more of RAM and as fast a CPU as you can fit. Because of this, you would likely need a Motherboard, Memory and CPU upgrade and, if you are going down that route, you're as well with a new PC.
#11
Cheers guys, looks like its going to be a new mini tower then. I'll pop into the local independent shop and get them to list what components they are going to use so I can ask on here if im getting ripped off / getting poor quality products. Will still post spec of my pc just incase its my settings or something silly like that.
#12
This is the info i get when I go to control panel and press system info

philips freevents intel
Pentium 4 cpu 3.2ghz
3.19ghz, 3.0gb of RAM
banned#13
MANJ_007
This is the info i get when I go to control panel and press system info

philips freevents intel
Pentium 4 cpu 3.2ghz
3.19ghz, 3.0gb of RAM


no wonder you cant play HD video!

you need a good modern processor and also a fair proper video card (so video processing is handled in the video card) and not integrated video, these are the things to look for
#14
I did say it was an old machine!!!! - LOL .The thing is i dont know about computers, i went to the local computer shop and here is their quote for 2 different specs, 1 for gaming with a good graphics card and the other with a normal graphics card.

Spec 1:
Intel Q8300
Gigabyte GA-EG41mf skt 775 mb
Nvidia 260gtx 896mb pci-x vga
6gb DDR2 ram
DVD-RW 22x
500gb SATAii HDD
Atx Case

£665.00 inc vat


Spec 2:
Intel Q8300
Gigabyte GA-EG41mf skt 775 mb
Nvidia 8600gtx 256mb pci-x
6gb DDR2 ram
DVD-RW 22x
500gb SATAii HDD
Atx Case

£555.00 inc vat
banned#15
too expensive!

buy a dell base unit around 400, add a 50 quid video card, and you will be much better off
#16
jubbyme
too expensive!

buy a dell base unit around 400, add a 50 quid video card, and you will be much better off


Any chance of pointing me in the right direction with a link please to a decent base unit?
#18


Thankyou - repped.

Will take a look into this
#19
its not really worth upgrading, do what jubby said =]

dell deals come around quite regularly so if you're not in a rush it may be worth hanging on for a better spec/similar price desktop
#20
coerce86
its not really worth upgrading, do what jubby said =]

dell deals come around quite regularly so if you're not in a rush it may be worth hanging on for a better spec/similar price desktop


Cheers, looks like all you guys are in agreement! My mrs aint gonna be happy!! :oops:

Anybody fancy making me a high spec pc? :)
#21
Ouch, that P4 processor. I agree with the gang to hold out for another hot Dell deal.
I would love to build you a PC but I would inevitably make you spend a lot of money on satisfying (yet arguably wasteful) premium parts lol. *kisses PC*
#22
MANJ_007;8897778
Hi, its a Sony HDR-XR155, from memory I think it records the file as .MTS

Probably sounds silly but what is AVCHD and how do I transcode it?


It does record in AVCHD then, this format is a popular choice for video as it is very bandwidth efficient due to its high compression rate which in short means you get very high quality video without taking up excessive amount of space. The downside is that you need a lot of processing hardware to work with this video type, there's plenty of sources on it but here's a couple:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AVCHD

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/gh1.shtml

Dealing with AVCHD
The AVCHD codec is both a blessing and a curse. It allows for very high data compression (required for the huge data rates of HD video) while at the same time providing manageable file sizes. But, it would require tremendous processing power to edit AVCHD directly in real time – more than even an 8 core, 3Ghz, dual processor computer can handle.
For this reason AVCHD needs to be transcoded; ie: turned into a format that while much larger is more easily handled by ones editing computer. Some non-linear editing programs can now handle this in an automatic or semi-automatic manner, including Sony Vegas, Final Cut Pro and IMovie 9. If your editing software can't handle AVCHD directly (or properly) you'll need to use a batch transcoding program such as NeoScene, which is discussed below under Support Software.


There's some discussion on software formats further down the page, I personally use Sony Vegas as it's reasonably cheap (around £50) and it makes it very easy by just allowing you to drop your mts files onto a timeline then save in a format of your choice.

I have the GH1 which produces 720p or 1080p AVCHD video files, as I mentioned earlier I have to transcode all my files to make them usable as aside from running on my powerful desktop machine it's useful for them to be able to run on other machines. A more powerful PC will certainly help in transcoding the video files, if you can stretch to a quad core i5 within your budget I'd definitely recommend it - my Core i7 desktop system is considerably faster at AVCHD conversion than my fastest laptop which uses a Core 2 Duo 2.8Ghz processor.

It's well worth keeping an eye on the Dell Outlet which is where they sell unwanted machines, these are usually brand new machines that have been returned which Dell clean up, repackage and sell on often with substantial discounts. The downside is you can't choose your spec and it can need a bit of patience waiting for a good machine to come up.

John
banned#23
could try VLCplayer

it seems to play files when other things struggle

http://www.videolan.org/vlc/
#24
Although I haven't checked recently, when I previously tried VLC with AVCHD 1080p files it had various performance and decoding problems, I don't know if they've fixed these bugs and improved the hardware decode assist.

John
#26
Can i just bump this so some kind person will tell me if either of the 2 pcs above are good.

Thanks
#27
MANJ_007;8907883
Can i just bump this so some kind person will tell me if either of the 2 pcs above are good.

Thanks

Neither is bad but nor are they great. You should be aiming for an i5 processor (i7 if you can afford it), 64 bit operating system, 4Gb of RAM and a video card which takes on the grunt of decoding HD video (a modern ATI should do the trick). Wait for one of the Dell deals.

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