What's the best way to save electricity by turning things off? - HotUKDeals
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What's the best way to save electricity by turning things off?

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As we all know, turning your tv etc off when not in use saves power, money and co2. But we don't do it, we're too lazy or can't reach the sockets easily. So, what's the best product to do this for … Read More
Benjimoron Avatar
7y, 8m agoPosted 7 years, 8 months ago
As we all know, turning your tv etc off when not in use saves power, money and co2. But we don't do it, we're too lazy or can't reach the sockets easily.

So, what's the best product to do this for us? Is the standby saver the best and worth the premium over simple remote control sockets? Personally I would probably be happy with remote control sockets and remember to press both remote controls, but do most people need the standby saver so that they can do it all through the same remote control?

I think the standby saver has a socket or two that stay on which is useful for sky plus etc.

Just wanted some opinions from people.

Thanks!
Benjimoron Avatar
7y, 8m agoPosted 7 years, 8 months ago
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#1
140335429674 on ebay.

Any good? How does the tv turn on again? Do you need to press your remote once to turn the unit on so your tv comes on standby, then press the remote again to actually turn your tv on?
#2
Always confused me a bit exactly how much these things can save. Sure, a lot of devices, particularly those more than three or so years old, are pretty inefficient on standby, but are newer tellys really that bad?

Seems like you are replacing one always-on remote control sensor with another - so unless you have a lot of devices which have a stand-by mode in a small area, do you really save that much?
#3
jah128
Always confused me a bit exactly how much these things can save. Sure, a lot of devices, particularly those more than three or so years old, are pretty inefficient on standby, but are newer tellys really that bad?

Seems like you are replacing one always-on remote control sensor with another - so unless you have a lot of devices which have a stand-by mode in a small area, do you really save that much?


I think in general you save around £30 a year by turning these things off for the 18 or whatever hours a day they're not used. Not sure how accurate that is for newer tellies, would be interesting to hear a few results for how much power people's tellies are using on standby. Mine is a few years old so may not be the best figure to use.

Anyone with new tellies able to lookup the standby usage figure? Should be in manual or on the net.
#4
Benjimoron;6008863
I think in general you save around £30 a year by turning these things off for the 18 or whatever hours a day they're not used. Not sure how accurate that is for newer tellies, would be interesting to hear a few results for how much power people's tellies are using on standby. Mine is a few years old so may not be the best figure to use.

Anyone with new tellies able to lookup the standby usage figure? Should be in manual or on the net.


£30 a year - thats ~200 KWh of electricty over the year (or about 25W of power). Most modern LCD TVs will use a small fraction of that on-standby (apparently new Panasonics are under 1W) - the power should basically be used by the remote-sensor circuit and losses in the AC-DC PSU for that circuit. You're just replacing one PSU and remote-sensor with another...

On the other hand, things like Xbox and PS3 use quite a lot on standby, and digiboxes will use a lot if they are left on, so there definately are some things that should always be switched off when not in use...

One other small thing - the rush of current to a PSU when it is connected to the mains is when they are most likely to break - not unlike lightbulbs blowing when you switch them on - if you switch something off and on a lot at the mains you will reduce its lifespan. How much this 'costs' in terms of increase failures would be incredibly hard to work out, and is almost certainly substantially less than any potential savings, but its worth considering nevertheless...
#5
jah128
£30 a year - thats ~200 KWh of electricty over the year (or about 25W of power). Most modern LCD TVs will use a small fraction of that on-standby (apparently new Panasonics are under 1W) - the power should basically be used by the remote-sensor circuit and losses in the AC-DC PSU for that circuit. You're just replacing one PSU and remote-sensor with another...

On the other hand, things like Xbox and PS3 use quite a lot on standby, and digiboxes will use a lot if they are left on, so there definately are some things that should always be switched off when not in use...

One other small thing - the rush of current to a PSU when it is connected to the mains is when they are most likely to break - not unlike lightbulbs blowing when you switch them on - if you switch something off and on a lot at the mains you will reduce its lifespan. How much this 'costs' in terms of increase failures would be incredibly hard to work out, and is almost certainly substantially less than any potential savings, but its worth considering nevertheless...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standby_power

Quite a good read.

As you say, modern tvs are coming down. But even at 10W you only need a couple of other devices in there in order to save your £30 a year. The device would effectively pay for itself within just a few months. Anything after that is pure profit!
1 Like #6
Benjimoron;6009049
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standby_power

Quite a good read.

As you say, modern tvs are coming down. But even at 10W you only need a couple of other devices in there in order to save your £30 a year. The device would effectively pay for itself within just a few months. Anything after that is pure profit!


If you have lots of 10W devices then yes, it definately would and would be a good thing to use. As the article says though, most modern TVs are well below that and brand new devices will have to be under 2W shortly and 1W not long after that. If you're just going to use such a device on a brand new TV though its probably counter-productive (it will probably end up using more power than the stand-by device in the TV!).

Its usually quite easy to tell if something (smaller than a TV) is using that much power anyway - think of a laptop charger when its plugged into a laptop - thats will be typically dissipating about 10W of heat - and they get pretty warm!
#7
jah128
If you have lots of 10W devices then yes, it definately would and would be a good thing to use. As the article says though, most modern TVs are well below that and brand new devices will have to be under 2W shortly and 1W not long after that. If you're just going to use such a device on a brand new TV though its probably counter-productive (it will probably end up using more power than the stand-by device in the TV!).

Its usually quite easy to tell if something (smaller than a TV) is using that much power anyway - think of a laptop charger when its plugged into a laptop - thats will be typically dissipating about 10W of heat - and they get pretty warm!


Good points.

Thanks.
#8
I find that the remote control sockets work best for me, they are versatile and cheap, also you can usually have one remote for multiple sockets.

As an aside it is worth checking what the consumption of your equipment actually is when on standby. I recently discover that my AAA rated washing machine uses [SIZE=5]3[/SIZE] units a week when only switched off at the front panel, so now we switch it off at the socket.
banned#9
just took delivery of the standby saver (free from BG) but isnt as good as the remote sockets

I have a ps3/wii/tv/360/dvd/hifi plugged into 1 remote socket and just hit the remote OFF button once I know everything is in standby

The standby saver works off one device being powered down (e.g. TV) but I like to leave my dvd player / games console etc on sometimes when I leave the room for say half an hour and just turn the TV off. I can foresee me turning the TV off and then seeing my ps3 etc gettting its power cut off instantly. Not good for it so sticking with the remote sockets.

cheapest way to save money is to put your pc to sleep whenever you walk away from it, even just for 10 mins (5w rather than 200W).
banned#10
Benjimoron;6008863
I think in general you save around £30 a year by turning these things off for the 18 or whatever hours a day they're not used. Not sure how accurate that is for newer tellies, would be interesting to hear a few results for how much power people's tellies are using on standby. Mine is a few years old so may not be the best figure to use.

Anyone with new tellies able to lookup the standby usage figure? Should be in manual or on the net.

just off to test my front room power consumption.......................
banned#11
blooming heck!

50W is my front rooms electric with everything on standby

thats about £40 per year in electric!

I;m glad I have the remote socket now as generally everything is off for about 20 hours per day!
#12
csiman
blooming heck!

50W is my front rooms electric with everything on standby

thats about £40 per year in electric!

I;m glad I have the remote socket now as generally everything is off for about 20 hours per day!


There we go mate, just goes to show that the remote sockets etc pay for themselves very quickly!

I got 10 of the single ones you posted from halfcost a while back!
#13
Remember that Sky Receiver updates are usually downloaded overnight and will not function if the receiver is switched off.

They will in standby.
#14
csiman;6009477
blooming heck!

50W is my front rooms electric with everything on standby

thats about £40 per year in electric!

I;m glad I have the remote socket now as generally everything is off for about 20 hours per day!


Check what just the 360 and PS3 are on their own :thumbsup:
banned#15
jah128;6009809
Check what just the 360 and PS3 are on their own :thumbsup:

they are all in a unit with my TV on top so cannot easily get to the plugs / on-off switches
#16
csiman;6009907
they are all in a unit with my TV on top so cannot easily get to the plugs / on-off switches



According to this site it seems the consoles don't use much in standby, just a couple of watts each - the Wii uses about 10W if WiiConnect24 is on or 1.3 if it isn't, so thats certainly worth turning off if you have a Wii.

Edit: This place suggests other wise though - particularly for the older models of PS3 and XBox - 35W standby for the PS3! Never ever ever have your PS3 on when its not being used though - almost 180W at idle is ridiculous!

Its weird how one site suggests ~2-3W on standby and the other 30W+ - maybe they made newer models much more efficient in standby, maybe one site is talking nonsense, but it would be interesting to break down your 50W and see where its actually going...
banned#17
jah128;6010182
According to this site it seems the consoles don't use much in standby, just a couple of watts each - the Wii uses about 10W if WiiConnect24 is on or 1.3 if it isn't, so thats certainly worth turning off if you have a Wii.

Edit: This place suggests other wise though - particularly for the older models of PS3 and XBox - 35W standby for the PS3! Never ever ever have your PS3 on when its not being used though - almost 180W at idle is ridiculous!

Its weird how one site suggests ~2-3W on standby and the other 30W+ - maybe they made newer models much more efficient in standby, maybe one site is talking nonsense, but it would be interesting to break down your 50W and see where its actually going...


I would say that one ps3 had remote start set to ON as that uses 25-30W in standby.
#18
csiman;6015548
I would say that one ps3 had remote start set to ON as that uses 25-30W in standby.


Sorry had wrong link in there earlier. The second review says a 60GB model PS3 uses 7W standby and 19W in standby+remote start (still far to much by anyones account) but the 40GB model used 35W in either standby mode - rediculous and very expensive, especially compared to the Wii which never uses more than 20W whilst playing games!
banned#19
jah128;6017336
Sorry had wrong link in there earlier. The second review says a 60GB model PS3 uses 7W standby and 19W in standby+remote start (still far to much by anyones account) but the 40GB model used 35W in either standby mode - rediculous and very expensive, especially compared to the Wii which never uses more than 20W whilst playing games!

yep - seems the 40gb ps3 is the power hogger when in standby (35W would get me selling it for an 80gb if I had one!)

managed to turn my 80gb ps3 off and it seems to consume about 3-5W when in standby

http://news.vgchartz.com/news.php?id=2018

only wish I could get the GF to turn of the 550W tv when she takes her power naps lol

just realised I have a router to my ps3 / 360 so that has no standby mode so probably accounts for 20W of the 50W standby consumption

guesstimate of standby in my front room (total c.50w)

router - 20w
ps3 - 5w
360 - 5w
wii - 3w
surround amp - 3w
100w subwoofer - 3w
pvr - 10w

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