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What's the difference - HD Ready / Full HD

martnb Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
Hi

I keep seeing posts for tvs and people say "it's not full HD" - how do I know and what is the difference between "HD Ready" and "Full HD"?

Is this a decent tv? Toshiba 32AV554DB

Thanks
martnb Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
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1 Like #1
Full HD is 1080p / 1080i

HD ready just means that the tv is capabale of producing a HD signal like 720p
#2
Thanks for the response.

So this isn't FullHD? Does it make a big difference?

* REGZA Active Vision LCD
* Visible Screen Size 81 cm
* Screen Format 16:9
* Panel Resolution 1366x768
* High Definition Ready
* 18000:1 Dynamic Contrast Ratio
* Active Vision LCD
* Standard TV up-scaling
* Brightness 450 cd/m2
* MPEG
Noise Reduction
* Selectable Picture Format
* 3D Digital Comb Filter
* Digital Noise Reduction
* Game Mode
* Connections:HDMI, 2 Composite, Component Video, 2 scarts (1RGB), Analogue Audio Input, Headphone, DVB
Common Interface
* Audio :NICAM Stereo
* Sound Output (RMS) 20 W
* Internal Speakers ON/OFF
1 Like #3
HD Ready is a specification. Therefore, stringent requirements are to be met for a device to meet the HD Ready standards. These are:

- Minimum resolution of 720 vertical pixels
- HDMI or DVI input supporting HDCP copy protection (this is important)
- Accept (but not necessarily display) a 1080 i input signal

Full HD (or more correctly, HD Ready 1080P) is a superset of HD Ready. The superset features are:

- 1080p display with one to one pixel mapping
- Display native video modes at the same or higher refresh rates

Most people believe the resolution is the defining factor for HD Ready or HD Ready 1080P. It is not. Both standards must meet HDCP decoding requirements and this is extremely important. Without this, the device does not comply to HD Ready or HD Ready 1080P specifications.
1 Like #4
Hd ready *should* mean that it has a vertical resolution of 720 lines (ish)

Full HD *should* have 1080 vertical lines.

some manufacturers put HD ready (1080p) for some reason.

the p means progressive which basically means the whole image is displayed as one instead of an interlaced picture where the odd pixels are shown then the even pixels ( so fast that your eye cant really tell the difference)

Basically 720p is a lower resolution, i think 'normal' tele is about 480 ish.

on a set less than 32" i wouldnt worry about the difference between 1080p and 720p because its unlikely you will tell the difference. On a 37" and above i would consider it.

The tele you mention is a 720p set, with built in freeview. The only very slight downside i can see is only 2 HDMI and no DVI. Doubt it would be of any problem to you though :)

Empire Direct are selling it at £299.

Wikipedia have some more info on HDTV that you may want to read :)

BFM
1 Like #5
only if you have a blu-ray player as it can produce full 1080p but sky hd is only 720p
1 Like #6
Without having a TV, my knowledge is that for a rule of thumb you won't benefit from Full HD on a screen much less than 37" in a standard size room to notice the difference and you'll probably have difficulty picking up a Full HD at 32". Decent HD readies are pretty good. It's stupid going to a house with a 40" and from the distance they are watching it at is all pixillated etc
#7
Thankyou all for your advice... for a 32" it would appear that it won't make a big difference? I found the toshiba one at empiredirect so for £299.99 seems like a reasonable buy?

Rep given thanks :thumbsup::thumbsup:
#8
BurningFeetMan
Hd ready *should* mean that it has a vertical resolution of 720 lines (ish)

Full HD *should* have 1080 vertical lines.

some manufacturers put HD ready (1080p) for some reason.

the p means progressive which basically means the whole image is displayed as one instead of an interlaced picture where the odd pixels are shown then the even pixels ( so fast that your eye cant really tell the difference)

Basically 720p is a lower resolution, i think 'normal' tele is about 480 ish.

on a set less than 32" i wouldnt worry about the difference between 1080p and 720p because its unlikely you will tell the difference. On a 37" and above i would consider it.

The tele you mention is a 720p set, with built in freeview. The only very slight downside i can see is only 2 HDMI and no DVI. Doubt it would be of any problem to you though :)

Empire Direct are selling it at £299.

Wikipedia have some more info on HDTV that you may want to read :)

BFM



By "normal TV" I believe you are referring to PAL resolution which is 720 x 576.

Why is it a downside to have HDMI rather than DVI? Both carry the same video signal but HDMI also carries HD Audio too.

HD Ready 1080P is actually the correct nomenclature. Full HD is not a standard and can refer to TVs that do NOT possess HDCP decoding which means HDCP encoded devices such as blu ray players may not work - remember blu ray and some HD sources are HDCP encrypted and requires the decoder for playback.
#9
dvi might be useful as i think you can use the dvi as a monitor or something from the pc.
#10
martnb
Thankyou all for your advice... for a 32" it would appear that it won't make a big difference? I found the toshiba one at empiredirect so for £299.99 seems like a reasonable buy?

Rep given thanks :thumbsup::thumbsup:


Empire Direct charge £19.99 for delivery so factor that in to your price but still a good deal IMO. Also 2% Quico cashback :)

BFM
#11
Artonox
dvi might be useful as i think you can use the dvi as a monitor or something from the pc.


By the same token, HDMI can be used to connect a computer to a TV. HDMI and DVI carry the same video signal.
#13
ElliottC
By "normal TV" I believe you are referring to PAL resolution which is 720 x 576.

Why is it a downside to have HDMI rather than DVI? Both carry the same video signal but HDMI also carries HD Audio too.

HD Ready 1080P is actually the correct nomenclature. Full HD is not a standard and can refer to TVs that do NOT possess HDCP decoding which means HDCP encoded devices such as blu ray players may not work - remember blu ray and some HD sources are HDCP encrypted and requires the decoder for playback.


I didnt say it was a downside to have HDMI rather than DVI, i meant that it was *possibly* a downside to have only 2 HDMI and 0 DVI. DVI can be useful for connecting a pc although you can buy an HDMI->DVI cable.

Are you sure the tele has to decrypt the information, i would of thought that was the point of the player itself? Are you saying that an HD Ready 1080p Television set may not play Blu-Ray? I think this would be a bit silly of any manufacturer to do that? Im sure i've misunderstood what you have written, but then i think many others might also?

BFM
#14
BurningFeetMan
I didnt say it was a downside to have HDMI rather than DVI, i meant that it was *possibly* a downside to have only 2 HDMI and 0 DVI. DVI can be useful for connecting a pc although you can but an HDMI->DVI cable.

BFM



Ah yes you did say 0 DVI.

HD Ready 1080P is a standard. Full HD is NOT. The upshot is that a Full HD TV may not be compatible with blu ray players and other devices that send an HDCP encrypted signal. That is why some manufacturers specify HD Rwady 1080P - it is a very important specification.
#16
So the toshiba one there, is that going to be able to receive a signal ok from my PS3 (as blue-ray / game). Or is the Sony Bravia 32'' KDL-32V4000 a better option?
#17
martnb
So the toshiba one there, is that going to be able to receive a signal ok from my PS3 (as blue-ray / game). Or is the Sony Bravia 32'' KDL-32V4000 a better option?



The Toshiba will receive a signal (and decode it) from a PS/3 or blu ray player because it carries the HD Ready logo which means it will decode HDCP encrypted signals.

I don't know about the Bravia model you mentioned but if that carries the HD Ready or HD Ready 1080P logo, it will also handle your PS3 and blu ray player. If it only specifies Full HD, then it may NOT support blu ray films. Full HD does not necessarily decode HDCP content - it is a very vague term used to mislead consumers and is not a standard.
#18
raptorcigs
only if you have a blu-ray player as it can produce full 1080p but sky hd is only 720p


Is this true that Sky HD is only 720P. So even if you have a TV that is 1080P the picture resolution and clarity will be the same as a 1080i set capable of supporting 720P?
#19
Carley
Which is best 1080i or 720p?


At the same frame rate, it is subjective. At different frame rates, there can be a difference - let me know if you want me to explain further regarding the frame rates when applied to 720p or 1080i.
#20
azzy129
Is this true that Sky HD is only 720P. So even if you have a TV that is 1080P the picture resolution and clarity will be the same as a 1080i set capable of supporting 720P?


Sky HD supports 1080i as well as 720p.

Assuming that it only supported 720p only then a 720P TV will display the picture in its native resolution whereas a 1080P TV (whether it's Full HD or HD Ready 1080P) will have to upscale the picture which may be inferior to a 720P TV due to differences in pixel sizes. This is dependent upon whether the TV possesses pre or post processing as part of the upscaling and also dependent upon the quality of the pre or post processing. Furthermore, processing a picture as part of upscaling can result in a lag in the picture which means if you change channels on the Sky remote there will be latency before you see a visual response.
#21
EICTA is the body that defines the HD Ready standards. More reading here:

http://www.eicta.org/index.php?id=32&id_article=50

wikianswers, yahoo answers, etc are mostly incorrect with information provided by Joe Public who make guesses at what HD Ready means. The above link provides the actual specification.
#22
ElliottC,

This tele states that it is HD ready, however it also states that it is NOT HDCP enabled, does that mean it will or wont play Blu-Ray ?

You have me confused now and i thought i knew what i was going on about.......

BFM
#23
It's just soooooooooo confusing

I want a 32" decent priced tv for watching telly and playing ps3/watching blue-ray on - doesnt have to be mega fancy. The ones I have found are:

Goodmans LD3266D 32'' HD ready LCD TV
TOSHIBA 32AV555DB
SAMSUNG LE32A457C1DXXU
Sony 32In KDL32V4000 HD Digital LCD TV
SHARP LC32D44EBK
Technika 32" HD Ready LCD TV with built-in Freeview LCD32-207

Can find them all between £299 and £349 - so the price isn't the big deal.... How on earth am I meant to know which is best!!:?::?:
#24
BurningFeetMan
ElliottC,

This tele states that it is HD ready, however it also states that it is NOT HDCP enabled, does that mean it will or wont play Blu-Ray ?

You have me confused now and i thought i knew what i was going on about.......

BFM



BFM,

The TV does not have to state HDCP decoding because, as mentioned, HD Ready is a standard of which HDCP decoding is one of the requirements for the standard. Consequently, a TV that carries the HD Ready logo or HD Ready 1080P logo supports HDCP decoding - that is why HDCP is not mentioned in the specification.
#25
martnb
It's just soooooooooo confusing

I want a 32" decent priced tv for watching telly and playing ps3/watching blue-ray on - doesnt have to be mega fancy. The ones I have found are:

Goodmans LD3266D 32'' HD ready LCD TV
TOSHIBA 32AV555DB
SAMSUNG LE32A457C1DXXU
Sony 32In KDL32V4000 HD Digital LCD TV
SHARP LC32D44EBK
Technika 32" HD Ready LCD TV with built-in Freeview LCD32-207

Can find them all between £299 and £349 - so the price isn't the big deal.... How on earth am I meant to know which is best!!:?::?:


If they carry the HD Ready or HD Ready 1080P logo, then your blu ray player is compatible. If you want to find out which is better than the other then you need to look at backlighting and grey scale/ colour scale charts. A good TV should have even backlighting (ie. no dark patches on certain parts of the screen but uniform brightness) and the scale charts should show even transitions from one shade of gray to another or one colour to another without banding.

Ignore response times as these are misleading. Manufacturers quote only the fastest response times which is the time for the fastest pixel change. However, some pixel changes are slower in responding. For example, red to green may take 5 ms but black to blue may take 20 ms. The manufacturer will sneakily mention a 5 ms response time and no mention of 20 ms response times for other pixel changes! It is no wonder that there is confusion due to confusing data from manufacturers. Contrast ratios are also misrepresented too.
#26
ElliottC
BFM,

The TV does not have to state that the TV has HDCP decoding because, as mentioned, HD Ready is a standard of which HDCP decoding is one of the requirements for the standard. Consequently, a TV that carries the HD Ready logo or HD Ready 1080P logo supports HDCP decoding - that is why HDCP is not mentioned in the specification.


Thats the problem HDCP IS mentioned and it specifically states that HDCP decoding is a no, thats why i asked, seems to be a contradiction of terms?

BFM
#27
BurningFeetMan
Thats the problem HDCP IS mentioned and it specifically states that HDCP decoding is a no, thats why i asked, seems to be a contradiction of terms?

BFM



Oh dear. What plonkers Comet really are! The manufacturer's specification says that this TV is indeed HD Ready and by definition, it most certainly is HDCP compliant as specified in EICTA's document. If the TV is being sold as HD Ready without HDCP compliancy then it is in breach of advertising standards. I can assure you that HDCP is built in to the HDMI interface of this TV.
#28
BurningFeetMan
Thats the problem HDCP IS mentioned and it specifically states that HDCP decoding is a no, thats why i asked, seems to be a contradiction of terms?

BFM



This site says HDCP enabled:

http://www.digiuk.com/productdetail.asp?id=12548

Trust me, I am very much involved in the industry and that TV is HDCP capable. Comet have no idea at all - just go to a Comet store and ask a salesperson to define HD Ready and after their reply ask them if that matches the EICTA specifications and you will know what I mean.
#29
You clearly know what you are talking about!

Sadly - despite all advice - I just haven't got a clue. And will therefore probably go for the brand I assume to be best which is sony..
#30
martnb
It's just soooooooooo confusing


Can find them all between £299 and £349 - so the price isn't the big deal.... How on earth am I meant to know which is best!!:?::?:


the sony was £299ish at john lewis w 5 yr warranty, sadly sold out now, best deal i have seen, good tv,. £343 on amazon is the cheapest now, if you want to spend a bit less try here: http://www.homecinematv.co.uk/showproduct.php?cda=showproduct&pid=SAM-LE32A457C1DX nice tv too, read around avforums reviews than you know what you're getting
#31
martnb
You clearly know what you are talking about!

Sadly - despite all advice - I just haven't got a clue. And will therefore probably go for the brand I assume to be best which is sony..


Sorry if I am confusing you. I have to be careful what I say because terminology is important - for example a TV that is Full HD may not work with blu ray players.

I will go through what I look for when I review TVs and computer monitors:

1. Backlighting - make sure the screen has uniform brightness and that it does not have dark patches on some areas.
2. Grey scale charts - observe a display of a grey scale chart showing dark grey to light grey. Observe that there is a smooth transition from one grey to another and little or no banding (that is, showing bands rather than a smooth transitition).
3. Colour charts - observe a colour chart and like (2) look out for smooth transitions.
4. Pure white - display a pure white picture and observe that it is white and there is no hint of green, blue or red.
5. Pre and post processing - this is a long topic in its own right so there is no scope to discuss that here.
6. Blackness - many LCDs do not produce true deep blacks. The reason is that a backlight is always on and blacks are shown by blocking out backlighting. Due to the nature of backlighting, some light seepage will occur and black pixels may not appear completely black. A good TV will do a good job of blocking out backlighting to produce blacks. This is important in dark scenes when watching movies.
#32
The sony one is £329 @ richer sounds with 5yr warranty..... looks good?

No no no Elliot - it's not you at all - there are so many things that can be simplified to understand the differences, it just appears with these that's not the case? I need to go through the techy things and try to decipher - I will go through your steps. Thankyou :thumbsup:
#33
martnb
The sony one is £329 @ richer sounds with 5yr warranty..... looks good?

No no no Elliot - it's not you at all - there are so many things that can be simplified to understand the differences, it just appears with these that's not the case? I need to go through the techy things and try to decipher - I will go through your steps. Thankyou :thumbsup:


I understand your frustrations. It doesn't help when Comet don't understand HD Ready and the same goes for DSG group salespeople too. One article I wrote was comparing technical knowledge of salespeople at High Street electrical stores and the conclusion was that they don't have a clue!
#34
ElliottC
Sorry if I am confusing you. I have to be careful what I say because terminology is important - for example a TV that is Full HD may not work with blu ray players.

I will go through what I look for when I review TVs and computer monitors:

1. Backlighting - make sure the screen has uniform brightness and that it does not have dark patches on some areas.
2. Grey scale charts - observe a display of a grey scale chart showing dark grey to light grey. Observe that there is a smooth transition from one grey to another and little or no banding (that is, showing bands rather than a smooth transitition).
3. Colour charts - observe a colour chart and like (2) look out for smooth transitions.
4. Pure white - display a pure white picture and observe that it is white and there is no hint of green, blue or red.
5. Pre and post processing - this is a long topic in its own right so there is no scope to discuss that here.
6. Blackness - many LCDs do not produce true deep blacks. The reason is that a backlight is always on and blacks are shown by blocking out backlighting. Due to the nature of backlighting, some light seepage will occur and black pixels may not appear completely black. A good TV will do a good job of blocking out backlighting to produce blacks. This is important in dark scenes when watching movies.


Sorry - just read this through - are these charts readily available in store when I go to purchase or online? My plan is to find one I like, look for it, then pay cheapest price online!! But not sure how I check what you have said?
#35
martnb
Sorry - just read this through - are these charts readily available in store when I go to purchase or online? My plan is to find one I like, look for it, then pay cheapest price online!! But not sure how I check what you have said?



Have a look at these sites:

http://www.oceanlight.com/html/about_color.html
http://www.stargazing.net/david/messier/testpatterns.html

A bad display will show bands of colour or gray scales. A good display will show smooth transitions.

The charts only provide basic tests though. If you need perfect calibration tests you will need to pay for the software. However, the supplied charts are sufficient for most. To use these charts, you need to take a laptop with you to the store and connect it to the TV you wish to purchase. You will need to access the websites for the charts to be displayed on the TVs. I am sure Comet, Currys, PC World, etc will allow you to connect a laptop (possibly one of their own) to the TVs for you to try the colour and grey scale tests.
#36
God, this thread makes the whole thing much more confusing!

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