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where do i go from here? (Careers advise needed)

gooddeals9 Avatar
banned6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
Hi all,

i'm in need of some career advise. I'm 20, and i left school with decent enough GCSE's, and since then, i got into an IT Apprentiship. I have an ITQ lv 2 & 3 and i attended college in the evening and am now a Microsoft Certified Professional and MSDST...

But my question is, where do i go from here? I'd love to be earning around £50,000 a year. I know i'm 20, but i have been looking at jobs and i just don't know how, being an IT guy, i'm going to be able to get up there.

I'd love a nice car, nice house, but it just seems like it's unreachable.

Help/advised would be very much appreciated.
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gooddeals9 Avatar
banned6y, 4m agoPosted 6 years, 4 months ago
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#1
m8 stick at it , its good to see a young guy with some aspirations and get up and go , my youngest 19 is at uni doing forensics and he like you wants to get on you keep at it and you will get there

singer
#2
what are you doing at the moment? Are you out of work or in a company & how big is the company?
banned#3
I work for local government, but i'd like to get out into a private company.
#4
local government's not so bad I almost ended up doing that should be enough opportunity to work your way up - they tend to look after thier own quite well when it comes to vacancies, promoting people inside and backfilling which I guess is what your after - if you do go for a private company I'd aim for a fairly large one so you can work your way through the teams unless your already in a decent team.

In my experience most smaller companies don't tend to have time for someone to learn the ropes in a new position and often want to keep people in the roles they are good at and bring people in from outside that can already hit the ground running in the vacant role.

for that sort of salary though you'll have to specialise in a specific area more I'd have thought or move into team leader then management roles? Are you aiming to stay techincal for now?

Obviously the above is only what I've seen and not the way it is at every workplace.
#5
Oh and governments (not sure about right now with the economy n'all) and larger companies tend to have bigger training budgets so if you up for more training and show that you can pass the exams that always comes in handy! Each of my courses cost around £1200 and thats before hotels & expenses!
banned#6
I don't mind staying technical, but before management roles etc, you're right, i'd need to work up to that.

it's just finding the vacancies in bigger companies, they don't seem to be after people at the moment.

would it be worth going to Uni ??
#7
i'm in need of some career advise. I'm 20, and i left school with decent enough GCSE's, and since then, i got into an IT Apprentiship. I have an ITQ lv 2 & 3 and i attended college in the evening and am now a Microsoft Certified Professional and MSDST...

But my question is, where do i go from here? I'd love to be earning around £50,000 a year. I know i'm 20, but i have been looking at jobs and i just don't know how, being an IT guy, i'm going to be able to get up there


Sorry - bubble bursting time, noone will employ on certifications alone. Without experience you are one of many applying for jobs.

With the Qualifications you currently have, you would get no more than a basic circa £14k position in anywhere other than london ( add £2k for there).

Good luck in earning £50k!
#8
that might be one only you can decide - depends I guess on what you think your opportunities are if you don't go - the whole job market should have picked up by the time you come out but I would value the MSDST route and add more to your technical qualifications instead of doing a degree - I'm pretty biased though because I didn't goto uni.

I'm sure some people on here will have a different view.

I just think that in the 4 years you could spend at uni if your employer will pay for it you could be doing more technical courses and exams which I feel are worth much more and more relevant to IT roles - I guess thats all debatable though.

Do you have colleagues at your current workplace in the roles you want to do next - if you get on with them ask them what they did and how they got to where they are now.

I'm not belittling a degree - the main reason I didn't do it was because I would have probably dropped out half way through and wasted my time - but experience along with technical certifications are (in my opinion) worth a lot more.
banned#9
Move into networking. Get your current employer to pay for your CCNA, it's of great benefit to both employer and employee. It's a lot harder than the MCPs you've done but more rewarding from a career point of view.

After gaining your CCNA then, if you think it's for you, go for the CCNP alongside the security specialist certs.

CCNP standard technicians should earn between 30 and 40k a year (outside London), move into a specialised area of networking with a few years experience and you should be clearing 50k if you're smart.
#10
master_chief
Move into networking. Get your current employer to pay for it, it's of great benefit to both employer and employee. It's a lot harder than the MCPs you've done but more rewarding from a career point of view.

After gaining your CCNA then, if you think it's for you, go for the CCNP alongside the security specialist certs.

CCNP standard technicians should earn between 30 and 40k a year (outside London), move into a specialised area of networking with a few years experience and you should be clearing 50k if you're smart.

Nice idea, but...so many people have taken this route that CCNA techs are rather plentiful right now and to move to CCNP is a bit of a reality check.

One thing perhaps worth looking at, if you prefer the MS route is sharepoint - a heavily undersubscribed technology that more and more companies are looking for.
banned 1 Like #11
Want to earn 50k

Learn to spell advice
banned#12
aardvarking
master_chief
Move into networking. Get your current employer to pay for it, it's of great benefit to both employer and employee. It's a lot harder than the MCPs you've done but more rewarding from a career point of view.

After gaining your CCNA then, if you think it's for you, go for the CCNP alongside the security specialist certs.

CCNP standard technicians should earn between 30 and 40k a year (outside London), move into a specialised area of networking with a few years experience and you should be clearing 50k if you're smart.

Nice idea, but...so many people have taken this route that CCNA techs are rather plentiful right now and to move to CCNP is a bit of a reality check.

One thing perhaps worth looking at, if you prefer the MS route is sharepoint - a heavily undersubscribed technology that more and more companies are looking for.


That's why I recommended him doing CCNA with current employer then moving onto CCNP level if he was up for it Plenty of CCNAs around though the failure level is high so it's good to have alongside an MCSE for example, MS exams can be studied for in a day or two from scratch so they're not highly regarded as an example of ones ability.

Good call on sharepoint though, seen a lot of positions requiring that recently. Salaries at around 30k for those, not sure how much they go up to though.
#13
master_chief
aardvarking
master_chief
Move into networking. Get your current employer to pay for it, it's of great benefit to both employer and employee. It's a lot harder than the MCPs you've done but more rewarding from a career point of view.

After gaining your CCNA then, if you think it's for you, go for the CCNP alongside the security specialist certs.

CCNP standard technicians should earn between 30 and 40k a year (outside London), move into a specialised area of networking with a few years experience and you should be clearing 50k if you're smart.

Nice idea, but...so many people have taken this route that CCNA techs are rather plentiful right now and to move to CCNP is a bit of a reality check.

One thing perhaps worth looking at, if you prefer the MS route is sharepoint - a heavily undersubscribed technology that more and more companies are looking for.


That's why I recommended him doing CCNA with current employer then moving onto CCNP level if he was up for it Plenty of CCNAs around though the failure level is high so it's good to have alongside an MCSE for example, MS exams can be studied for in a day or two from scratch so they're not highly regarded as an example of ones ability.

Good call on sharepoint though, seen a lot of positions requiring that recently. Salaries at around 30k for those, not sure how much they go up to though.


Agreed! the MSxx exams are not based on what you know, rather on how MS would like you to do things - am in the same boat myself. My expertise is MS exchange but have had to self teach for the most part! I wonder where cisco are changing too - now that theire ASA's are in place
#14
attended college in the evening and am now a Microsoft Certified Professional and MSDST
well that should be enough for a call centre job then, go for a degree if you can and does not matter if you invented the internet most big companies wont look at you without qualifications.
#15
Hi gooddeals9,

If I was you, I would work out what I want to be and then work out what you need to get to do it.

1. A degree would very useful, I'm currently recruiting for a member of staff working for me (IT position) and the first of the prerequisites is a degree (2:1 min), I'm flexible on skill set but I require some proof that they have a brain, and before anyone says a degree doesn't proof that, with over 40% of young people being graduates it's a reasonable first hurdle. If they're clever then I can train them to do what I do.

2. Specialise in something, is desktop support going to get you to the 50k you want? Probably not...

3. Have a look at jobserve, jobsite, ITjobwatch; what is the skill requirements, for jobs you like the look of.. Then work out how you get there. See 1. and 2. ....

4. Do you have a position at the moment, having you feet under the table is half the battle? Use the fact you're in a company to move sideways into a specialised field (see 2).

Small hint, look at what is required in fields that pay a higher daily rate for contractors (Permie rates tend to compress the differences between specialisms)

Fish
#16
Why not get your employer to sponsor you to do a part time degree at local uni or OU it's harder than full time, but your still earning.
banned#17
thanks for the replies. aardvarking, i fully understand that my certificates wont help me a great deal, and to be absolutely honest, i found that they were an insult. The Microsoft exam was written in 2001 and was talking about 95, 98 and NT. Luckilly, i was brought up on 95, so when it came to dial-up and VPN etc, i knew what i was talking about.

However, a lady who knew NOTHING, got 100%. So certificates don't mean everything.

But you're right guys, i need to specialize in something.

Thanks for the replies, it has given me something to think about.
#18
If I were you I would try and get a degree but do it part-time. Your employer might let you do it - local government is normally very good at helping out someone like you who wants to be better qualified and they might pay your fees and let you have time off work. A term is only 10 weeks long and you could work full-time in vacations and go part-time in term. In the long run better qualifications will help - who knows in 30 years time what jobs in IT will be like but a degree will always help, whatever field you end up in. You stand a better chance of earning a good salary with a degree. Your local government work might even count as practical coursework towards the degree modules.
As fishtastic says in the future 40% of your competitors will have degrees so while you are young take the chance and go for it.
#19
I wonder if any universities would take you straight on to a degree course? As you are only 20 you wouldn't qualify as a mature student so the entrance criteria would be the same as other 20 year olds so looking for UCAS points. Perhaps your quals do carry UCAS points, I'm not sure. Not trying to be negative but I think it would be something to check out before making any decision. Might want to start with the UCAS guide and perhaps call some unis or the OU to find out what would be available. No sense in making a decision only to find more obstacles in your way.

UCAS points tariff table here http://www.ucas.ac.uk/students/ucas_tariff/tarifftables/

Unis will almost certainly want you to apply through the UCAS system but there's always a chance that some might be willing to consider you so phoning round would be an idea.

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