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Which undercoat?

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I know a daft question but the paint has peeled off in our conservatory an I notice it didn't have any undercoat. What undercoat should I go for as obviously, despite being double glazed, our conse… Read More
fruityloops Avatar
7y, 2m agoPosted 7 years, 2 months ago
I know a daft question but the paint has peeled off in our conservatory an I notice it didn't have any undercoat.

What undercoat should I go for as obviously, despite being double glazed, our conservatory does seem to get weather extremes (either burning hot in the summer or freezing cold in the winter) or will any type do?
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fruityloops Avatar
7y, 2m agoPosted 7 years, 2 months ago
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banned#1
what is it made of?

if metal, is it galvanised steel, or aluminium

need a specific primer for the material, then undercoat to help show the topcoat colour (white for brights, grey for darks), then a couple of topcoats
lack of proper priming is why it's peeled off
often a boat/ship chandler sells the best paint, as its designed for tough weather, and sell all kinds of primer
#2
If it is made of wood:

For light coloured paint - white undercoat

For dark paint - grey

There are other colours of undercoat,but I don't see the point in them.
#3
jubbyme
what is it made of?

if metal, is it galvanised steel, or aluminium

need a specific primer for the material, then undercoat to help show the topcoat colour (white for brights, grey for darks), then a couple of topcoats
lack of proper priming is why it's peeled off
often a boat/ship chandler sells the best paint, as its designed for tough weather, and sell all kinds of primer



+1
Often the preparation is more important than the paint used....
#4
Is it inside or outside?
#5
If it's bare wood , it should be primed first ,for inside woodwork you can use Acrylic [drys in a hour ]. Exterior woodwork , use a oil based primer , then the usual oil based undercoat and gloss .I have used all paints on the market , [I'm a decorator [38 years experience]] and have used the Crown range [acrylic primer ,undercoat & gloss ] for years , but have switched to the Wickes range of paint . So far , no problems .
But a few years ago I checked out a range of undercoat & gloss by Sandtex , they tell me it will last for 6 years . It's expensive though , so I did'nt buy it . I was looking for a better paint for my flat ,living a hundred yards from the Northumberland coast plays havoc with my window and door paintwork , the extreme temperatures play a part in peeling the paint as you say .
#6
Oh no, it's on the inside and I think it's just plaster underneath, although is totally smooth (so not on the actual double-glazing). The windows are UPVC.
#7
i would say no undercoat - just emulsion then
banned#8
if the paint is peeling off the plaster inside, hmm

damp maybe, needs sanding right back, wait for summer so it can dry out, then use a waterproof paint and not an interior emulsion
#9
oh okay. It had just emulsion before and that's what peeled off but maybe sanding would help it to grip (or does it not work like that?). Anyway, being a conservatory there's not that much wall so it's not going to break the bank either way I guess.
banned#10
DAMNOME
i would say no undercoat - just emulsion then


i would say you dont have a clue am a painter and i would sand it right down leave it to dry out abit then i would prime it with wood primer then get some some sandex undercoat its really good bit dear tho but gives you five years pretection hope this helps or get an allweather undercoat
1 Like #11
Oh , interior walls . A very common mistake with a new plastered room is the type of emulsion used .SILK vinyl is the wrong paint to use , it will lie on the surface and gradually peel off . Professional decorators of old would thin down emulsion and paint the walls , BUT , this is MATT type paint , this paint contains no vinyl and is absorbed into the plaster forming a base coat . Once this has dried ,then you can put on what you like .
There is special paint for the job , I first used this over 20 years ago . Made by Johnsons and called OBLITERATING EMULSION . This was non-vinyl emulsion that allowed new plaster to breath as it dried out . I now use the Wickes type of obliterating ..........simply called paint for new plaster .
When it comes to decorating ........PREAPARATION ...... is the key word . Most modern day cowboys have never heard of this word :-)
#12
Thank you for all the information, great tips and recommendation, it really is much appreciated.

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