Who has had Littlewoods reclaim money for vouchers in 2008/9 and who hasn't? - HotUKDeals
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Who has had Littlewoods reclaim money for vouchers in 2008/9 and who hasn't?

£0.00 @ Littlewoods
There seems to be a lot of negative posts made about using the voucher codes posted here and elsewhere so I thought I'd ask if anyone has actually had any money reclaimed for using a voucher they wasn…
jtx Avatar
7y, 10m agoPosted 7 years, 10 months ago
There seems to be a lot of negative posts made about using the voucher codes posted here and elsewhere so I thought I'd ask if anyone has actually had any money reclaimed for using a voucher they wasn't eligible to use.

I have used the vouchers that were posted here a few times with no problems.

I am aware of the horror stories which all seem to point to around 2007?

Has anyone got any relevant (good or bad) experience or links from 2008/9

Edit: Nobody, (since 2007) seems to have had the money reclaimed after being charged the discounted price. This is key, if your card is debited for the full price you can simply refuse delivery
Other Links From Littlewoods:
jtx Avatar
7y, 10m agoPosted 7 years, 10 months ago
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(22) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Mine have worked apart from the £10 no min spend one.
#2
used the £50 of £100 and £30 of £60 on 2 accounts no problem
#3
I used a £25 off the other day and still got charged full price, phoned them up and the woman said that they credit my account when the final item has been dispatched.

If it hasn't been credited when I recieve the item I've to ring them and they will do it over the phone. If they send you the goods AFTER you have used the code and you recieved no confirmation of them not honouring the code, they HAVE to honour the voucher.
#4
Mine have all worked fine.
#5
not a problem... used £25 voucher no min spend , so free items. so far so good
#7
They tried to reclaim the £25 one on me, my OH and my father BUT GOT NOWHERE!
#8


Thanks, seems weird as everytime my voucher code has been accepted, my card has beeen charged with the discount already applied.

Nobody, (since 2007) seems to have had the money reclaimed after being charged the discounted price. This is key, if your card is debited for the full price you can simply refuse delivery:?
#9
harlzter
They tried to reclaim the £25 one on me, my OH and my father BUT GOT NOWHERE!



Now we're getting somewhere:lol:. How did they do it and how long ago?
[helper]#11
Wife got sent a £25 voucher in the post. Used it and got charged full price. After several phone calls and letters she eventually did get it - this was summer last year
#12
http://www.internetretailing.net/news/littlewoods-recharges-customers-for-use-of-online-vouchers
Littlewoods recharges customers for use of online vouchers

In an unprecedented move Littlewoods has demanded that online vouchers (in the form of discound codes) it issued and accepted be repaid by its customers who obtained the discount codes from chat rooms and and consumer voucher-exchange sites. Liverpool Trading Standards are apparently satisfied that the retailer's operating within its rights, but this is the first time we've heard of vouchers not only being declined but actually charged back to customers.




The £25 voucher was intended for a specific group of customers who were sent a code. This is of course entirely standard practice to segment promotions.
In this case, however, some customers posted the codes in internet chat rooms. Other customers (whom Littlewoods did not intend to incentivise) obtained the codes and found that they "worked", giving them £25 credit.

The lessons for Littlewoods are clearly to either use a "tear off" voucher approach (where a code, once used, can't be used again) or to have front-end validation that checks whether the code is valid (this should be discernable from the customer's details which of course they need to enter in order to check out).

That neither the front-end validation was in place nor the effort to print/create a single code per recipient indicates that the promotion was either ill-considered or was not of sufficient size to merit this care.

A Littlewoods spokesman told the BBC:

[INDENT]"A £25 discount code was created for a small group of specific customers.

"This code was then circulated, without our authorisation, through a number of websites resulting in around 3,000 customers obtaining a discount for which they were ineligible.
"As a result, in accordance with clause 2.3 of our online terms and conditions we have re-charged this discount back to their accounts and have written to them individually to explain."
[/INDENT] Hm - so let's do the math here, as they say... £25 x 3,000 = £75,000. This is hardly enough of a promotional knock to dent the £400million online turnover.

If the Marketing team at Littlewoods had calculated their promotions correctly one would hope that even with a promotional offer the trigger threshold would be sufficient to make a profit, or at least break even. So many promotions go "accidentally viral" that the suspicion is that it's a calculated ruse to extent adoption of the promotion. When Threshers had a voucher distributed widely via the web it was claimed that a million people used the 40%-off voucher. At the time a spokesperson said
[INDENT]It could end up hitting our profit margins.
[/INDENT] Note - "hit our margins" not "make a loss"...

The suspicion must be therefore that the promotion was not marginally profitable in Littlewoods' case.

Littlewoods is fortunate in that it has a significant corpus of account customers. These are customer who charge purchases to a rolling credit account, rather than paying for each transaction upon checkout with a credit card. This means that it's relatively easy for Littlewoods to apply a charge or reverse a discount without having to go via a credit card company.

Anyway, the unnamed Littlewoods spokesman concluded:

[INDENT]we are looking at a number of ways of ensuring this doesn't happen again.
[/INDENT] I'm not sure whether s/he's referred to 'getting promotional calcualtions wrong', 'not having a voucher validation system' or 'being heavy-handed with customers'... Maybe all of the above.

Ian Jindal

Disclosure: Ian was for a while Group eCommerce Director at Littlewoods Shop Direct.

Do you have any stories about vouchers that have "gone viral"? Was this on purpose? What did you do? Please spill the beans - either in the comments or in strictest, anonymised confidence to us at press at internetretailing.net
by Ian Jindal
#13
harlzter

A Littlewoods spokesman told the BBC: [/B]


In 2007:p
#14
http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/390059/showpost.php?p=5063496&postcount=5


By Paul Smith

When we highlighted the saga of the latest Littlewoods promotional vouchers, we thought we may be opening a whole can of worms with ants in their pants. Plenty of you told us how unhappy you were with the looming threat of having to refund discounts awarded by Littlewoods, because the vouchers were only applicable to particular people and new customers.

picture 2 Littlewoods promotional offer RESULT!

We heard from several of you who’d had dealings with Littlewoods in the past, we discussed the matter at length with a solicitor on Friday, and ultimately we couldn’t find a definitive answer for those who had made purchases using the promotional codes. ******.

So thank goodness for Littlewoods then, and thank you to a senior manager at the Shop Direct Group for letting us know the following good news:

Further to your article I can confirm that with regards to this voucher code, we will not be reclaiming back from customers, regardless of whether they were eligible or not.

So those of you who frequent the HUKD forums, rejoice and rest easy, safe in the knowledge that both your goods and your bank account are safe and sound.

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Tags: littlewoods
Posted in Consumer legal December 8th, 2008 |
#15
I used a £30 off a £60 spend the other day. But I don't like the item, so i am sending it back for a refund.. We will see what happens.
#16
was charged full amount just before xmas. many angry phone calls/letters later i was refunded.
#17
harlzter
http://www.internetretailing.net/news/littlewoods-recharges-customers-for-use-of-online-vouchers
Littlewoods recharges customers for use of online vouchers

In an unprecedented move Littlewoods has demanded that online vouchers (in the form of discound codes) it issued and accepted be repaid by its customers who obtained the discount codes from chat rooms and and consumer voucher-exchange sites. Liverpool Trading Standards are apparently satisfied that the retailer's operating within its rights, but this is the first time we've heard of vouchers not only being declined but actually charged back to customers.




The £25 voucher was intended for a specific group of customers who were sent a code. This is of course entirely standard practice to segment promotions.
In this case, however, some customers posted the codes in internet chat rooms. Other customers (whom Littlewoods did not intend to incentivise) obtained the codes and found that they "worked", giving them £25 credit.

The lessons for Littlewoods are clearly to either use a "tear off" voucher approach (where a code, once used, can't be used again) or to have front-end validation that checks whether the code is valid (this should be discernable from the customer's details which of course they need to enter in order to check out).

That neither the front-end validation was in place nor the effort to print/create a single code per recipient indicates that the promotion was either ill-considered or was not of sufficient size to merit this care.

A Littlewoods spokesman told the BBC:

[INDENT]"A £25 discount code was created for a small group of specific customers.

"This code was then circulated, without our authorisation, through a number of websites resulting in around 3,000 customers obtaining a discount for which they were ineligible.
"As a result, in accordance with clause 2.3 of our online terms and conditions we have re-charged this discount back to their accounts and have written to them individually to explain."
[/INDENT] Hm - so let's do the math here, as they say... £25 x 3,000 = £75,000. This is hardly enough of a promotional knock to dent the £400million online turnover.

If the Marketing team at Littlewoods had calculated their promotions correctly one would hope that even with a promotional offer the trigger threshold would be sufficient to make a profit, or at least break even. So many promotions go "accidentally viral" that the suspicion is that it's a calculated ruse to extent adoption of the promotion. When Threshers had a voucher distributed widely via the web it was claimed that a million people used the 40%-off voucher. At the time a spokesperson said
[INDENT]It could end up hitting our profit margins.
[/INDENT] Note - "hit our margins" not "make a loss"...

The suspicion must be therefore that the promotion was not marginally profitable in Littlewoods' case.

Littlewoods is fortunate in that it has a significant corpus of account customers. These are customer who charge purchases to a rolling credit account, rather than paying for each transaction upon checkout with a credit card. This means that it's relatively easy for Littlewoods to apply a charge or reverse a discount without having to go via a credit card company.

Anyway, the unnamed Littlewoods spokesman concluded:

[INDENT]we are looking at a number of ways of ensuring this doesn't happen again.
[/INDENT] I'm not sure whether s/he's referred to 'getting promotional calcualtions wrong', 'not having a voucher validation system' or 'being heavy-handed with customers'... Maybe all of the above.

Ian Jindal

Disclosure: Ian was for a while Group eCommerce Director at Littlewoods Shop Direct.

Do you have any stories about vouchers that have "gone viral"? Was this on purpose? What did you do? Please spill the beans - either in the comments or in strictest, anonymised confidence to us at press at internetretailing.net
by Ian Jindal


[SIZE="6"]its from 2007 and they backed down[/SIZE]
#18
In used a £30 off one last year and haven't had any bother.
#19
a £30 and a £10 one were reclaimed around christmas time. she rang and said they wernt available to me so they added the cost back onto my account. this was about 2 month after id used them
#20
Ive used loads and never had any come back off them.
#21
I`ve used over a 100 vouchers and none have been reclaimed as of yet!!!
#22
jtx;5065154
In 2007:p

queensclose;5069521
[SIZE=6]its from 2007 and they backed down[/SIZE]


No need to shout then,


And? It went on for a fair while and caused people stress!

Also the OP's title didnt say any period in to start with, it's since been edited.

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