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Why do people allow this to occur?

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Someone should be accountable? http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3837711/Baby-boy-dies-child-seriously-injured-attacked-dog.html Read More
airfix Avatar
9m, 1w agoPosted 9 months, 1 week ago
airfix Avatar
9m, 1w agoPosted 9 months, 1 week ago
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1 Like #1
This is so sad . At the end of the day though , a dog is a pack animal. Is it to blame or is the owner ? A dog can be trained to obey without too much difficulty . That is assuming that is the kind of pet the owner wants ...
5 Likes #2
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
#3
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.

Exactly the post I was going to make.

I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.

You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
#4
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.

Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets. As you say it's a certain type of owner that's the problem, if Staffies were banned they'd just attach themselves to another breed and the problem would remain, any dog can become aggressive if mistreated or neglected.

As to possible solutions, maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.

Edited By: spoo on Oct 14, 2016 09:05
#5
spoo
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets. As you say it's a certain type of owner that's the problem, if Staffies were banned they'd just attach themselves to another breed and the problem would remain, any dog can become aggressive if mistreated or neglected.
As to possible solutions, maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.

Do you really think those who have these types of dogs that go onto commit attacks would care about registering, etc?
#6
spoo
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets. As you say it's a certain type of owner that's the problem, if Staffies were banned they'd just attach themselves to another breed and the problem would remain, any dog can become aggressive if mistreated or neglected.
As to possible solutions, maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.

Let's be honest though. Your solution is unlikely to be implemented whereas there is precedent for my solution.

In the meantime this story will be repeated. Another child will likely die.
1 Like #7
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.

Sadly those types will just move onto another breed to give that breed a bad reputation.
3 Likes #8
My son was savagely attacked by a Staffy.The dog was owned by the Headmaster of his school and was on a lead being walked.A family dog,loved all his life (was 10 years old) my son passed him outside of our house on the way back from a walk and bent down to pet the dog (as he has done many times before) and the dog, for no apparent reason leapt for my son's throat.Thankfully my son had just finished stroking the dog and had started to stand up so the dog missed his throat but savaged the bottom half of his face.He had to have plastic surgery and still has scarring to this day-he is now 26.There was no reason for this dog to attack.The problem is that in that moment when it does, it is far stronger than the person holding the lead and it's jaws are clamped shut.A smaller, less strong breed would not inflict the damage that these dogs do.It is unfortunately not predictable when a dog will attack and is not easily passed off as either the owner or the dog's fault.
#9
dtovey89
spoo
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets. As you say it's a certain type of owner that's the problem, if Staffies were banned they'd just attach themselves to another breed and the problem would remain, any dog can become aggressive if mistreated or neglected.
As to possible solutions, maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.
Do you really think those who have these types of dogs that go onto commit attacks would care about registering, etc?

The ones who get dogs with the aim of training them to be aggressive wouldn't bother with it but they're not the only type of bad dog owner. A guaranteed way of turning a dog aggressive is lack of exercise with people not bothering to walk their dog and this is I think more down to ignorance rather than any maliciousness. Pre-ownership checks would flag these sort of owners. Added on to that it could easily be made a condition that breeders cannot legally sell a dog without proof the buyer has passed the pre-check.

Of course there'll always be owners and breeders who would ignore the law the same as there'll always be people who drive without tax and insurance but it would still make a difference.
2 Likes #10
To be honest the blame is always on the owners of the animal, and they should be tried in court for failure to control a dangerous animal.

I would like to see these owners get some years in jail.
1 Like #11
spoo
dtovey89
spoo
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets. As you say it's a certain type of owner that's the problem, if Staffies were banned they'd just attach themselves to another breed and the problem would remain, any dog can become aggressive if mistreated or neglected.
As to possible solutions, maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.
Do you really think those who have these types of dogs that go onto commit attacks would care about registering, etc?
The ones who get dogs with the aim of training them to be aggressive wouldn't bother with it but they're not the only type of bad dog owner. A guaranteed way of turning a dog aggressive is lack of exercise with people not bothering to walk their dog and this is I think more down to ignorance rather than any maliciousness. Pre-ownership checks would flag these sort of owners. Added on to that it could easily be made a condition that breeders cannot legally sell a dog without proof the buyer has passed the pre-check.
Of course there'll always be owners and breeders who would ignore the law the same as there'll always be people who drive without tax and insurance but it would still make a difference.

The people who have dogs that go onto commit these attacks wouldn't care about owning them illegally.
How can you manage a situation where you have to have every single dog in the country recorded without depending on a reliable anonymous reporting system? Even then loads would fall through the net and you'd still see attacks.

The only solution is to ban the breed.
3 Likes #12
spoo
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
..maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.
Surely this is done already? We had to be interviewed and have a visit when we adopted a cat! oO
1 Like #13
paulsalmon77
To be honest the blame is always on the owners of the animal, and they should be tried in court for failure to control a dangerous animal.

I would like to see these owners get some years in jail.
Spot on! Dogs like these shouldn't be anywhere near a baby! Child neglect at the very least.
#14
Dog was owned by a policewoman. :|
1 Like #15
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.

"it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem"

"Dog is thought to have belonged to Essex police officer Clare Ferdinand, 31"
#16
dtovey89
spoo
dtovey89
spoo
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
Predikuesi
Before I clicked on the link I knew it would be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I'll be glad when these status symbols lose their appeal. I agree that they can be trained correctly. Bad people train dogs to be bad.
Exactly the post I was going to make.
I have no doubt that these dogs can be as well behaved as other breeds but it's the combination of a certain breed of dog and a certain type of owner that is the problem.
You either stop them owning these dogs which is impossible or you ban the breed which is unfortunate, an overreaction but sadly the only feasible way of stopping things like this.
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets. As you say it's a certain type of owner that's the problem, if Staffies were banned they'd just attach themselves to another breed and the problem would remain, any dog can become aggressive if mistreated or neglected.
As to possible solutions, maybe the system used by some animal rescue charities could be adopted into law whereby all potential dog owners are interviewed and receive a home visit before they are allowed to take on a dog. Not foolproof but it would filter out some bad owners.
Do you really think those who have these types of dogs that go onto commit attacks would care about registering, etc?
The ones who get dogs with the aim of training them to be aggressive wouldn't bother with it but they're not the only type of bad dog owner. A guaranteed way of turning a dog aggressive is lack of exercise with people not bothering to walk their dog and this is I think more down to ignorance rather than any maliciousness. Pre-ownership checks would flag these sort of owners. Added on to that it could easily be made a condition that breeders cannot legally sell a dog without proof the buyer has passed the pre-check.
Of course there'll always be owners and breeders who would ignore the law the same as there'll always be people who drive without tax and insurance but it would still make a difference.
The people who have dogs that go onto commit these attacks wouldn't care about owning them illegally.
How can you manage a situation where you have to have every single dog in the country recorded without depending on a reliable anonymous reporting system? Even then loads would fall through the net and you'd still see attacks.

The only solution is to ban the breed.

"The people who have dogs that go onto commit these attacks wouldn't care about owning them illegally."

"Dog is thought to have belonged to Essex police officer Clare Ferdinand, 31"
1 Like #17
airfix
Dog was owned by a policewoman. :|

Sorry didn't scroll down before posting.
#18
spoo
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets.
Nonsense. That "Hank" dog that people were campaigning for recently, he was found to be a banned breed and was he killed? No, banned dogs are assessed on a case-by-case basis and loving, gentle pets are not destroyed, but they must be:

neutered,
kept on a lead and muzzled in a public place,
kept in sufficient conditions to prevent escape even when not in a public place,
made available to an authorised officer for inspection on demand

Hardly unreasonable, quit scaremongering.
#19
Rubisco
spoo
Banning the breed would serve no purpose other than the the death of a large number of loving, gentle pets.
Nonsense. That "Hank" dog that people were campaigning for recently, he was found to be a banned breed and was he killed? No, banned dogs are assessed on a case-by-case basis and loving, gentle pets are not destroyed, but they must be:
neutered,
kept on a lead and muzzled in a public place,
kept in sufficient conditions to prevent escape even when not in a public place,
made available to an authorised officer for inspection on demand
Hardly unreasonable, quit scaremongering.

Based on this evidence from Battersea Dogs Home on the implementation of rules around currently banned breeds, it's not scaremongering at all:
https://www.battersea.org.uk/new-battersea-research-provides-damning-verdict-dangerous-dogs-act-25-years
"Of the 91 Pit Bull Terriers we took in last year, we believe we could have rehomed at least 71% of them as family pets, due to their friendly and affectionate nature. Under the law we are forced to put these dogs to sleep."
Hank was reprieved because of a huge social media campaign, he was one of small number of exceptions.

I'm in agreement with the RSPCA and British Veterinary Association, both of whom are of the opinion that breed specific legislation (ie blanket bans on individual breeds) are ineffective and the law should instead focus on owners:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/08/dangerous-dogs-act-has-failed-to-keep-people-safe-warns-rspca/
https://www.bva.co.uk/uploadedFiles/Content/News,_campaigns_and_policies/Policies/Companion_animals/ps_dangerous_dogs.pdf

Neutering dogs you don't specifically intend to breed from and keeping ALL dogs muzzled in public is something I have no problem with at all, those are 2 law changes which would definitely cut down on dog attacks.




Edited By: spoo on Oct 15, 2016 13:30: .
1 Like #20
Reports say the mother was in the bath. It's possible the dog was in another room but escaped or the older boy managed to let it out.

It's a terrible tragedy but an avoidable one.

The mother and her two boys had recently moved in with her sister, it was the sisters dog. All the more reason to understand the dog may be jealous. Small children and babies make high pitched noises and sudden movements, things that may unsettle a dog. We've all seen photos of children sitting on dogs or tugging their ears, dogs are not toys, they have a breaking point.

If this had been a dog with a smaller jaw, the bites may not have been so severe, its unfortunate that staffies have big wide, powerful jaws and when they bite they cause serious damage. The breed itself is usually an affectionate dog but faced with small children, just like any other breed they may snap.

The surviving boy is going to be traumatised for life.

Completely avoidable and there should be a prosecution for whoever was supposed to secure the dog was not able to be in contact with the baby and small child.

Edited By: Mark2111 on Oct 15, 2016 22:20: Staffies
#21
"Heaven has gained a beautiful little angel"

Yes if you believe in that mumbo jumbo but in reality the baby is dead and due to sheer negligence.
2 Likes #22
my m8 has a staffy he is so loving, he is 10 and still like a puppy he loves to sit on your knee, and be stroked, But he looks scared when kids are around, they make different sounds to us, running and shouting and screaming, he will always come and sit buy your side when in the company of children, after a few mins he is fine and will let the stroke him and is happy.

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES, would he ever be left alone with any children, he has never shown any aggression to humans ever, but he is a dog and a very powerful one at that, the main problem with this bread is their power, even a warning bite could take a finger off.

I love this dog very much, but I always remember what he could do if he wanted to

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