Why is my dell dimension 3000 soooo slow??? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Why is my dell dimension 3000 soooo slow???

AvengingLiam Avatar
9y, 4m agoPosted 9 years, 4 months ago
i have had this pc for nearly two years but have only recently started using it as have got round to setting up a home network! but i am finding it terriblyey slow, i have used the dell decrapifier and it hasnt really made any diffence, my hard drive is 70gb and i have used 10gb and i the only apps i use are itunes, msn messenger and firefox, i have avg virus thing installed too, any quick fixes? thanks
Tags:
Other Links From Dell:
AvengingLiam Avatar
9y, 4m agoPosted 9 years, 4 months ago
Options

All Comments

(19) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
What are the specifications of your Dell ? Being a 3000, its definatly outdated now. If you dont have a clue on your specs follow this link and do a screen shot, and ill see whats up. http://www.cpuid.com/download/cpu-z-140.zip :thumbsup:
#2
Spyware, Malware, a possible trojan, the list is endless.

Bet its one of those three, usually is.
#3
run 'spybot search and destroy' you can get it from cnet.com for free.

Any beasties will be removed !!
#4
Simon_G
Spyware, Malware, a possible trojan, the list is endless.

Bet its one of those three, usually is.


Sounds quite likely, if so you could give the free version of Ad-Aware a try... http://www.lavasoftusa.com/products/ad_aware_free.php
#5
I would suggest running a disk clean-up, a defragmentation and then running a virus/spyware scan on the machine - There's plent of links to freebies in the free software section!

Also, check your start up and remove any unnecessary programs, then check the processes in 'Task Manager' and see if any one particular process is using all of your power. (If so, then Google the process name & find out what it is/what it does etc).

I have noticed in our work PCs, that the 'Svchost.exe' process is causing quite a few problems. There is a bug with the Microsoft updates which will cause this to run at anything up to 99% CPU power.
If this is the case, then disable 'Automatic updates' in admin tools/services and run updates manually.

Good luck!

PS - To find the spec of your PC (When originally shipped), enter your service tag - normally on a label on the back of the PC - into the following link :-

http://support.euro.dell.com/support/topics/topic.aspx/emea/shared/support/my_systems_info/en/details?c=uk&cs=ukbsdt1&l=en&s=bsd
#6
hi i am on another pc at the mo but i have done clean up and defrag so far. adn cpu power is staying reallty high on the dell ill have alook at specs later thanks all
#7
AvengingLiam
i have had this pc for nearly two years but have only recently started using it as have got round to setting up a home network! but i am finding it terriblyey slow, i have used the dell decrapifier and it hasnt really made any diffence, my hard drive is 70gb and i have used 10gb and i the only apps i use are itunes, msn messenger and firefox, i have avg virus thing installed too, any quick fixes? thanks


I knew this part of my assignment would be useful to someone...

• Ensure that Windows XP is utilizing the NTFS file system. If you're not sure, here's how to check: First, double-click the My Computer icon, right-click on the C: Drive, then select Properties. Next, examine the File System type; if it says FAT32, then back-up any important data. Next, click Start, click Run, type CMD, and then click OK. At the prompt, type CONVERT C: /FS:NTFS this process may take a while; it's important that the computer be uninterrupted and virus-free. The file system used by the bootable drive will be either FAT32 or NTFS. I highly recommend NTFS for its superior security, reliability, and efficiency with larger disk drives.

• Disable file indexing. The indexing service extracts information from documents and other files on the hard drive and creates a "searchable keyword index." As you can imagine, this process can be quite taxing on any system.
The idea is that the user can search for a word, phrase, or property inside a document, should they have hundreds or thousands of documents and not know the file name of the document they want. Windows XP's built-in search functionality can still perform these kinds of searches without the Indexing service. It just takes longer. The OS has to open each file at the time of the request to help find what the user is looking for.

Most people never need this feature of search. Those who do are typically in a large corporate environment where thousands of documents are located on at least one server. But if you're a typical home user and you have no need for this search feature, I recommend disabling it. Here's how: First, double-click the My Computer icon. Next, right-click on the C: Drive, then select Properties. Uncheck "Allow Indexing Service to index this disk for fast file searching." Next, apply changes to "C: subfolders and files," and click OK. If a warning or error message appears (such as "Access is denied"), click the Ignore All button.

• Update the PC's video and motherboard chipset drivers. Also, update and configure the BIOS.

• Empty the Windows Prefetch folder every three months or so. Windows XP can "prefetch" portions of data and applications that are used frequently. This makes processes appear to load faster when called upon by the user. That's fine. But over time, the prefetch folder may become overloaded with references to files and applications no longer in use. When that happens, Windows XP is wasting time, and slowing system performance, by pre-loading them. Nothing critical is in this folder, and the entire contents are safe to delete.

• Once a month, run a disk cleanup. Here's how: Double-click the My Computer icon. Then right-click on the C: drive and select Properties. Click the Disk Cleanup button -- it's just to the right of the Capacity pie graph -- and delete all temporary files.

• Remove all spyware from the computer. Use free programs such as AdAware by Lavasoft or SpyBot Search & Destroy. Once these programs are installed, be sure to check for and download any updates before starting your search. Anything either program finds can be safely removed. Any free software that requires spyware to run will no longer function once the spyware portion has been removed; if you really want the program even though it contains spyware, simply reinstall it.

• Remove any unnecessary programs and/or items from Windows Startup routine using the MSCONFIG utility. Here's how: First, click Start, click Run, type MSCONFIG, and click OK. Click the StartUp tab, then uncheck any items you don't want to start when Windows starts

• Turn off any and all unnecessary animations, and disable active desktop. In fact, for optimal performance, turn off all animations. Windows XP offers many different settings in this area. Here's how to do it: First click on the System icon in the Control Panel. Next, click on the advanced tab. Select the Settings button located under Performance. Feel free to play around with the options offered here, as nothing you can change will alter the reliability of the computer -- only its responsiveness.

• Visit Microsoft’s Windows update site regularly, and download all updates labelled Critical. Download any optional updates at your discretion.

• Update anti-virus software on a weekly, even daily, basis. Make sure you have only one anti-virus software package installed. Mixing anti-virus software is a sure way to spell disaster for performance and reliability.

• Make sure you have fewer than 500 type fonts installed on your machine. The more fonts you have, the slower the system will become. While Windows XP handles fonts much more efficiently than did the previous versions of Windows, too many fonts, that is, anything over 500, will noticeably tax the system.

• Do not partition the hard drive. Windows XP's NTFS file system runs more efficiently on one large partition. The data is no safer on a separate partition, and a reformat is never necessary to reinstall an operating system. The same excuses people offer for using partitions apply to using a folder instead. For example, instead of putting all your data on the D: drive, put it in a folder called "D drive." You'll achieve the same o benefits that a separate partition offers, but without the degradation in system performance. Also, your free space won't be limited by the size of the partition; instead, it will be limited by the size of the entire hard drive. This means you won't need to resize any partitions, ever. That task can be time-consuming and also can result in lost data.

• Check the system's RAM to ensure it is operating properly. I recommend using a free program called MemTest86. The download will make a bootable CD or diskette (your choice), which will run 10 extensive tests on the PC's memory automatically after you boot to the disk you Remember, bad memory cannot be repaired, but only replaced.

• If you're sick of a single Windows Explorer window crashing and then taking the rest of your OS down with it, then follow this tip: open My Computer, click on Tools, then Folder Options. Now click on the View tab. Scroll down to "Launch folder windows in a separate process," and enable this option. You'll have to reboot your machine for this option to take effect.

• At least once a year, open the computer's cases and blow out all the dust and debris. While you're in there, check that all the fans are turning properly. Also inspect the motherboard capacitors for bulging or leaks.


Hope it helped :thumbsup:

Zak.
#8
Spec: 1 D07302a Dimension 3000
1 Dimension 3000 Celeron D Processor 345 (
1 Save ?70ex Vat
1 English- Documentation With English Powe
1 256 Mb Nonecc 333mhz Ddr Memory (1x256)
1 Floppy Drive Not Included
1 80gb Ide (7, 200rpm) Hard Drive
1 48x Dvd/cdrw Combo Drive
1 Sonic Software For Cd/rw Read/write And
1 Powerdvd 5.1 Software (no Recovery Cd)
1 Fp/mg - Uk/irish - 17in (e173fp Tco99) V
1 Speakers Not Included
1 Modem Not Included
1 Mouse Pad With Dell Logo
1 Dell Mg Usb 2 Button Wheel Optical (not
1 Uk/irish (qwerty) - Dell Entry Midnight
1 English Genuine Windows Xp Home Sp2 (no
1 English Microsoft Works 8.0 (word Proces
1 Uk Internet Service Provider - Tiscali (
1 English - Photo Album Se Basic (no Recov
1 Paint Shop Pro X Std - English
1 English Adobe Reader 7.0.8 (no Recovery
1 English Dell Support 3.0 (no Recovery Cd
1 Dell Media Experience 3.1
1 Antivirus English Norton Internet Securi
1 90 Day Car (collect And Return)
1 Base Warranty
1 Svc Basic 3y Nbd, 30day Online Mm Traini
1 Support Pack Multimedia E-learning Lite
1 Apc Backups Cs500 Uk/fr/gr
1 Dimension Order - Uk
1 Road Freight Charge Per Unit 1-10 Unit
#9
how do i do this??
• Empty the Windows Prefetch folder every three months or so. Windows XP can "prefetch" portions of data and applications that are used frequently. This makes processes appear to load faster when called upon by the user. That's fine. But over time, the prefetch folder may become overloaded with references to files and applications no longer in use. When that happens, Windows XP is wasting time, and slowing system performance, by pre-loading them. Nothing critical is in this folder, and the entire contents are safe to delete
#10
I work in IT, before you do anything backup vital files, create a system restore point, backup up your system state, create a ghost image of your PC, etc etc. Have a plan A and B, backup you data to another Hard Drive and a DVD for example, test that you can get the data back before you do anything.

When you've done this, do the following:

Uninstall any software you don't use, if you don't know what it is or you didn't install it, leave it be.

defrag your hard disc

type msconfig into your run box and click on the startup tab to see what programs run at startup, do you really need all those programs running? - again if you don't know what the program is then leave it.

check your virtual memory - should be 1.5 X the size of your physical ram

run something like hitman pro - this automates the whole process, install it update it and leave it running - it may take a while!

Failing that I always find that every 2-3 years of use a PC benefits from having a complete reinstallation of the operating system, - this should not be attempted by a novice.

Hope this helps somewhat, remember backup before doing any of this.
#11
AvengingLiam
how do i do this??
• Empty the Windows Prefetch folder every three months or so. Windows XP can "prefetch" portions of data and applications that are used frequently. This makes processes appear to load faster when called upon by the user. That's fine. But over time, the prefetch folder may become overloaded with references to files and applications no longer in use. When that happens, Windows XP is wasting time, and slowing system performance, by pre-loading them. Nothing critical is in this folder, and the entire contents are safe to delete



I turned it off, I saw no performance boost from it and it seem to be working my hard drive all the time, windows performance seemed to be improved with it off.
#12
also are you running XP?

256MB RAM is a little low in my book for XP, I would try to upgrade to 512mb or better still 1GB, make sure you try to buy the same make and type of ram you are currently using.
#13
scoopy2scoops
I turned it off, I saw no performance boost from it and it seem to be working my hard drive all the time, windows performance seemed to be improved with it off.


well these tweaks I posted obviously can't convert your pc to a super computer. But these little tweaks do snowball and eventually lessen the load on your computer. Hence it performs much better.

Mind you, with the specs mentioned in the other post, the person who started the thread needs an upgrade and a format.

Zak.
#14
i have just run spybot found and destroyed 30 entries. also reduced number of apps on startup. seems a bit bettter thanks alot.

what will hitman pro tell me?

i ams ure morere ram would be the right answer but will probably leave it an i guess i will replace it with a mini tower pc next year.
#15
inside101
Sounds quite likely, if so you could give the free version of Ad-Aware a try... http://www.lavasoftusa.com/products/ad_aware_free.php



Have you tried this one AvengingLiam? ^^

I use that aswell as spybot as it picks up anything it misses.

Also if you have just deleted 30 for spybot, I'd do a thorough scan with your anti-virus!
#16
AvengingLiam
i have just run spybot found and destroyed 30 entries. also reduced number of apps on startup. seems a bit bettter thanks alot.



you're welcome - glad I could help :thumbsup:
#17
Iom-RF
Have you tried this one AvengingLiam? ^^

I use that aswell as spybot as it picks up anything it misses.

Also if you have just deleted 30 for spybot, I'd do a thorough scan with your anti-virus!

ok i wasnt going to do both but on your say i will! thanks i would have otherwise thought it would just be the same things!
#18
OK um.. anyone heard of XoftSpy? Very impressive and expensive peice of software. Adaware, Spybot etc don't even come close. Highly recommended. *cough* But who buys software these days anyhows? *cough*

Zak.
#19
Surely someone else can use this info - so bump. :w00t:

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!