Will a fridge freezer work in a utility room? - HotUKDeals
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Will a fridge freezer work in a utility room?

fairy Avatar
8y, 2w agoPosted 8 years, 2 weeks ago
I know that if you put a fridge or fridge freezer in a garage they will often stop working as the temperature is too cold. Well can you store the same in a utility room where it is likely to be hot or will the thing not work properly either? Thanks
fairy Avatar
8y, 2w agoPosted 8 years, 2 weeks ago
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#1
Provided the temperature doesn't get too cold, and it sounds like yours won't, you will be fine.
#2
should do - had mine in utility room for years - no probs - also had an extra fridge and freezer in shed and never had a problem

there was some concern few years ago as they put a thermostat in some ff which tripped out ifwent below a certain temperature - but as i said i have had no probs
#3
If you put it in a room that's too warm, then the fridge can't get rid of the heat it's removing from the enclosed space (box), plus you'll put additional load on the compressor (motor) and increase running costs, reduce lifetime etc.

Most refrigeration systems in the UK are designed to run in ambient temperatures of no more than 28-30 degrees C, 15-22 C ideal

The assumption that a fridge/freezer won't work in an area that is too cold is on systems that only have one thermostat/compressor, usually controlled by the fridge section; therefore when the temperature drops below the set point the fridge won't run and subsequently will not provide cooling for the freezer section.

Hope this helps...

NV
#4
my fridge in garage works fine keeeeeeeps the beer justed right.........
been in there for over a year best thing i did...
nothin worst than warm beer.....
banned#5
holly100;3876618
should do - had mine in utility room for years - no probs - also had an extra fridge and freezer in shed and never had a problem

there was some concern few years ago as they put a thermostat in some ff which tripped out ifwent below a certain temperature - but as i said i have had no probs

whilst you may not have had a problem, it is very inefficent, therefore expensive to run, when you have fridge / freezers running at temps below 10 degrees centigrade.

strange but true ;-)
#6
csiman
whilst you may not have had a problem, it is very inefficent, therefore expensive to run, when you have fridge / freezers running at temps below 10 degrees centigrade.

strange but true ;-)


thanks for info -but it is handy to have extra freezer - as someone else said about fridge - mainly used for beers!! (o/h - honestly):thumbsup:
banned#7
csiman
whilst you may not have had a problem, it is very inefficent, therefore expensive to run, when you have fridge / freezers running at temps below 10 degrees centigrade.

strange but true ;-)


Would need to see some proof before believing that statement. I don't have a garage now though so I can't run a fridge/freezer there for a month with a monitor attached to the socket to check.
#8
Mine runs in my garage and I've never had any problems.
banned#9
moob
Mine runs in my garage and I've never had any problems.


I did this for 2.5yrs too no probs, hardly ever came on during the winter saves loads of money I reckon :thumbsup:
#10
I have a chest freezer in my garage and until recently also kept a spare fridge in there, ran both for years with no problems. Until this year also had a freezer in the utility room which is where the boiler is and again had no problems. Had more problems with fridge that I kept in kitchen, have had four fridges in kitchen area over past eight years. :)
banned#11
kidcat
I have a chest freezer in my garage and until recently also kept a spare fridge in there, ran both for years with no problems. Until this year also had a freezer in the utility room which is where the boiler is and again had no problems. Had more problems with fridge that I kept in kitchen, have had four fridges in kitchen area over past eight years. :)


Wow I think you need to splash out on a better make
#12
i also had chest freezer in garge for years with no problem except me getting cold when i need somethink out of there lol
#13
so to summarise - the f/f in utility room should be fine. It is certainly not going to be too cold - my concern is tha the boiler is down one end so it is a VERY cosy room - sort of like being near a lagged hot water tank. I am buying full size larder fridge so trying to find somewhere to put the f/f as it will be the only freezer I have.
#14
Not sure about the utility room, give it a try and see what happens.

We have a chest freezer outside containted in a plastic sheddy thing and has been fine these past 10 years.
#15
fairy
so to summarise - the f/f in utility room should be fine. It is certainly not going to be too cold - my concern is tha the boiler is down one end so it is a VERY cosy room - sort of like being near a lagged hot water tank. I am buying full size larder fridge so trying to find somewhere to put the f/f as it will be the only freezer I have.


It'll more than likely work OK but;

1) it is likely to be inefficient
and
2) you are likely to reduce the potential lifespan

IMO

NV
banned#16
Nightvenom
It'll more than likely work OK but;

1) it is likely to be inefficient
and
2) you are likely to reduce the potential lifespan

IMO

NV


Yes but it is an opinion, we need facts! :roll: you haven't even given an explanation behind your opinion. My explanation is the motor doesn't come on as many times to bring the temperature down therefore it will last longer and save you money.
#17
We have a huge fridge freezer in the garage - Never had any problems. Used to have one in the utility room aswell and that was fine.
banned#18
lumoruk;3876726
Would need to see some proof before believing that statement. I don't have a garage now though so I can't run a fridge/freezer there for a month with a monitor attached to the socket to check.

A simple bit of mind thought

cooling is caused by removing moisture via heating a massive coil at the back so the coils need to generate heat.

storing the coils at sub-zero or cold temps is gonna increase electrical consumption

I'm sure someone can point you to 'internet' proof but common sense should be enough :thumbsup:
#19
lumoruk
Yes but it is an opinion, we need facts! :roll: you haven't even given an explanation behind your opinion. My explanation is the motor doesn't come on as many times to bring the temperature down therefore it will last longer and save you money.


lol,

ok, it's an opinion based on 26 years as a refrigeration engineer

You may have missed the point that they're saying the utility room is warm/hot. :whistling:

NV
#20
csiman
A simple bit of mind thought

cooling is caused by removing moisture via heating a massive coil at the back so the coils need to generate heat.

storing the coils at sub-zero or cold temps is gonna increase electrical consumption

I'm sure someone can point you to 'internet' proof but common sense should be enough :thumbsup:


Urm, not quite right my friend.

The cooling is achieved by boiling a liquid that evaporates at subzero temperatures,

The refrigerant is then returned to the compressor in a gasseous state where the pressure and temperature are raised to a sufficient level whereby the high pressure/high temperature gas can be cooled back down into a liquid state. This high pressure "warm" liquid is then fed to the evaporator where the liquid passes through a restriction causing a pressure drop over the liquid, this liquid then becomes a low temperature "saturated" liquid/vapour mix whereby as the mix passes through the evaporator the remaining liquid boils off (at low temperature) absorbing the heat from the cooling compartment.

Once all the liquid has boiled off, the gas is returned back to the compressor to be pumped around the system again and the cycle restarts.......

Very basic but that's the pyhsics behind modern compression refrigeration systems generally found in domestic fridge/freezers.

Now absorbtion refrigeration is another type all together.......
banned#21
Sorry you lost me there. I believe it means hot liquids/vapours evaporate faster and more efficiently in colder climates?
#22
lumoruk
Sorry you lost me there. I believe it means hot liquids/vapours evaporate faster and more efficiently in colder climates?


Close..

The colder the ambient (area where the fridge actually is), the easier it is for the system to reject the absorbed heat (from the enclosed fridge space).

This is why if a fridge is stored in a "hot" space is inefficient, system pressures and temperatures rise causing more work for the compressor to do. If it can't efficiently get rid of the absorbed heat, then the fridge may not work at all or have a reduced cooling effect. increased pressures/temperatures also increase the power consumption of the compressor: Increased running costs...

Going back to my first comment: about combined fridge/freezers with only one thermostat;

If the controlling temperature is the fridge section and the ambient temperature is too low then the fridge section will not call for cooling even if the freezer needs it. End result the freezer section fails but the fridge section appears ok but is actually being cooled by the outside air temperatures....

NV

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