Windows Uses 20% Of Your Bandwidth Get It Back!! - HotUKDeals
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Windows Uses 20% Of Your Bandwidth Get It Back!!

jaguark Avatar
8y, 5m agoPosted 8 years, 5 months ago
OK 1st thing is that i dont want to be held responsible for anything. This is a windows tweak that will make your surfing better. (maybe increase ur download speed little) check 1st reply for step by step
jaguark Avatar
8y, 5m agoPosted 8 years, 5 months ago
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#1
Do it at your own risk...(i had no problems but if anyone thinks they may get problems then dont do it thanks)

[COLOR="Red"]
Here's How To Get It Back!!


A nice little tweak for XP. Microsoft reserve 20% of your available bandwidth for their own purposes (suspect for updates and interrogating your machine etc..)

Here's how to get it back:

Click Start-->Run-->type "gpedit.msc" without the "

This opens the group policy editor. Then go to:


Local Computer Policy-->Computer Configuration-->Administrative Templates-->Network-->QOS Packet Scheduler-->Limit Reservable Bandwidth
(dont click on the + sign on QOS packet scheduler, click on the name itself then you will see the 'Limit Reservable Bandwidth)

Double click on Limit Reservable bandwidth. It will say it is not configured, but the truth is under the 'Explain' tab :

"By default, the Packet Scheduler limits the system to 20 percent of the bandwidth of a connection, but you can use this setting to override the default."

So the trick is to ENABLE reservable bandwidth, then set it to ZERO(0).

This will allow the system to reserve nothing, rather than the default 20%.

Tested on XP Pro.
Also working with Win 2000.
It's not working on XP Home Edition.[/COLOR]
#2
You can pre-type your 1st reply to avoid this. :)
#3
jaguark
emm, am lost?


My reply was before your reply, but has moved. :?
#4
thesaint
You can pre-type your 1st reply to avoid this. :)


emm, am lost?
#5
will give it a shot and see??
#6
Does this work with Vista ? :?
#7
jaguark
A nice little tweak for XP. Microsoft reserve 20% of your available bandwidth for their own purposes (suspect for updates and interrogating your machine etc..)


Untrue. QoS is designed entirely for the purposes of enabling two-tier access to the network. One tier for apps that don't need maximum connection priority, a higher tier for those that do. QoS is, it has to be said, rather useless for home users, but it's ideal for business systems, which'll be why the feature isn't available in XP Home, but is in the business operating systems, XP Pro and Win2K.



And, to Snowtiger - it might do, depending on the version of Vista you use. Click Start, right-click Network, click properties, click Manage Network Connections, right-click Local Area Connection (or whatver network connection is listed as being 'enabled'), click properties, untick the box next to QoS Packet Scheduler, click OK. You're done.

Don't expect miracles from this, though. Your internet connection's speed isn't limited by your home network, so for browsing, you're going to notice no difference. Only if you're copying files from one PC to another might you notice any change.
#8
So this would enable the transfer of files on my home network to be quicker?
This would be handy as it is taking AGES to send files from my PC to the GF's laptop ready for burning :p

Mike..
#9
Microsoft article about the subject: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;EN-US;Q316666

One hundred percent of the network bandwidth is available to be shared by all programs unless a program specifically requests priority bandwidth. This "reserved" bandwidth is still available to other programs unless the requesting program is sending data. By default, programs can reserve up to an aggregate bandwidth of 20 percent of the underlying link speed on each interface on an end computer. If the program that reserved the bandwidth is not sending sufficient data to use it, the unused part of the reserved bandwidth is available for other data flows on the same host.


Changing this won't affect anything and may degrade your experience of programs that need a high priority.

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