Yet another important topic. Government outsourcing for their own departments - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Yet another important topic. Government outsourcing for their own departments

myjess Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
If the Government outsource the support of computers to a 3rd party
company, should that 3rd party company be made to keep the jobs for British people, or should they be allowed, like other private companies, to outsource jobs to the likes of India?

After all, it is our taxes that are paying for these departments, so our taxes are paying people overseas to support our government departments.

Seems very bad to me!

Comments?
myjess Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
Options

All Comments

(13) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
the government are duty bound to get the best deal for taxpayers-end of story.
#2
Well, that duty is wrong. government should be duty bound to make sure that jobs that we pay for are British jobs, if the jobs are for Government departments, quango's, etc.
#3
There's a "trial" going at the moment where Police are being outsourced to private security firms.

They did something simular with mobile speed units last year.

Just opens the door to coruption IMO as they're not policed. One thing having SO's but the two above is/was rediculous!!!
#4
gal2792t
There's a "trial" going at the moment where Police are being outsourced to private security firms.

They did something simular with mobile speed units last year.

Just opens the door to coruption IMO as they're not policed. One thing having SO's but the two above is/was rediculous!!!


because of course the official police force has no corruption:whistling:
#5
barky
because of course the official police force has no corruption:whistling:


to busy playing in the snow
#6
RESPECT MY AUTHORIT'A
http://www.gifmania.co.uk/South-Park/Cartman/Cartman_police/copcart.gif
#7
gal2792t
There's a "trial" going at the moment where Police are being outsourced to private security firms.

They did something simular with mobile speed units last year.

Just opens the door to coruption IMO as they're not policed. One thing having SO's but the two above is/was rediculous!!!


Where is the trial?
#8
pghstochaj
Where is the trial?


Manchester. The firm is G4S and the daily telegraph article is here
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/6817790/Private-security-firm-used-by-police-to-investigate-crimes.html

G4S, Britain’s largest security firm, has hired out 30 people to a police force to take part in a “major investigation”, reporting to a senior officer, and has also provided guards at recent environmental demonstrations.

John Shaw, the new head of the firm’s “policing business” unit, said he aims to quadruple the amount of work that G4S does for police forces.

The majoprity of the 12,000 "police freelancers" on the firm's books are retired officers. But the expansion of private-sector outsourcing by police forces has worried civil rights campaigners and union bosses.

The Police Federation, which represents rank-and-file, is opposed to the moves and Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, said there were “considerable legal, constitutional and public confidence issues when what many of us see as core policing duties are farmed out to unaccountable private security firms”.

Mr Shaw said that the economic crises meant all police roles were “up for grabs” except those requiring powers of arrest.

But he said he appreciated concerns in some forces “because clearly it is no longer them controlling the environment”.
“The timing is right for an honest debate about what really constitutes front-line policing,” he said.

He added: “We have a team of 30 of our guys in one force on a major investigation right now, practically doing all of the roles except that of the senior investigating officer.”

Civilian workers, most of whom are retired police officers, are increasingly being used by police to investigate serious crimes, and in Manchester the first fully civilian murder squad has been set up.

Peter Fahy, chief constable of Greater Manchester police, said the formation of private-sector investigation teams, to be parachuted-in when needed, seemed a “logical extension” of the current practice of using civilians on large cases.
“After the arrest . . . much of the work is admin,” he said. “It depends on the . . . case, but many murders are not that complex.”
#9
gal2792t
Manchester. The firm is G4S and the daily telegraph article is here
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/6817790/Private-security-firm-used-by-police-to-investigate-crimes.html

G4S, Britain’s largest security firm, has hired out 30 people to a police force to take part in a “major investigation”, reporting to a senior officer, and has also provided guards at recent environmental demonstrations.
John Shaw, the new head of the firm’s “policing business” unit, said he aims to quadruple the amount of work that G4S does for police forces.
The majoprity of the 12,000 "police freelancers" on the firm's books are retired officers. But the expansion of private-sector outsourcing by police forces has worried civil rights campaigners and union bosses.
The Police Federation, which represents rank-and-file, is opposed to the moves and Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, said there were “considerable legal, constitutional and public confidence issues when what many of us see as core policing duties are farmed out to unaccountable private security firms”.
Mr Shaw said that the economic crises meant all police roles were “up for grabs” except those requiring powers of arrest.
But he said he appreciated concerns in some forces “because clearly it is no longer them controlling the environment”.
“The timing is right for an honest debate about what really constitutes front-line policing,” he said.
He added: “We have a team of 30 of our guys in one force on a major investigation right now, practically doing all of the roles except that of the senior investigating officer.”
Civilian workers, most of whom are retired police officers, are increasingly being used by police to investigate serious crimes, and in Manchester the first fully civilian murder squad has been set up.
Peter Fahy, chief constable of Greater Manchester police, said the formation of private-sector investigation teams, to be parachuted-in when needed, seemed a “logical extension” of the current practice of using civilians on large cases.
“After the arrest . . . much of the work is admin,” he said. “It depends on the . . . case, but many murders are not that complex.”


That's ok then, the firm is not acting as a police force and the hired individuals are just doing basic roles, not arresting people etc.
#10
pghstochaj
That's ok then, the firm is not acting as a police force and the hired individuals are just doing basic roles, not arresting people etc.


He added: “We have a team of 30 of our guys in one force on a major investigation right now, [COLOR="Gray"]practically doing all of the roles except that of the senior investigating officer[/COLOR].”
#11
Personally my answer is yes, it should be kept in the UK regardless of cost - the cost would of course be used to purchase products in the UK and would benefit the economy.

We have strict employment laws which positively discriminate for EU citizens above non-EU applicants through work permit requirements.
#12
gal2792t
He added: “We have a team of 30 of our guys in one force on a major investigation right now, [COLOR="Gray"]practically doing all of the roles except that of the senior investigating officer[/COLOR].”


What are those roles and what does "practically" mean? Those roles might be sitting down and reading page after page of documents, it probably doesn't mean implementing search warrants and driving traffic cars in high speed pursuits :)
#13
pghstochaj
What are those roles and what does "practically" mean? Those roles might be sitting down and reading page after page of documents, it probably doesn't mean implementing search warrants and driving traffic cars in high speed pursuits :)


As an SIO is basically the lead PO in the case, I read it as potentially anything below this role. So detention officer in empty cell who doesn't like gays, crowd controller with heavy batton who doesn't like blacks and traffic officer "I'm gonna pull you over and give you three points on your license and a £60 fine as you look like a chav and I wanna feel big", could encompass this could it not?

I am being a little pedantic here I know, but there is potential for all the above as their statement is a little vague to say the least. If they weren't arresting people wouldn't you expect them to at least make the point of saying they weren't to build up public trust?

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!