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10 Energizer Max Plus Batteries - £4.50 (Instore or +£2 C&C) @ Wilko
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10 Energizer Max Plus Batteries - £4.50 (Instore or +£2 C&C) @ Wilko

£4.50£8.5047%Wilko Deals
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13 Comments
at least 4 for a £1 for alkaline batteries in any pound shop makes this a bad deal
fiqqer29/10/2019 11:45

at least 4 for a £1 for alkaline batteries in any pound shop makes this a …at least 4 for a £1 for alkaline batteries in any pound shop makes this a bad deal


They're horrible quality 3 of them last as long as 1 of these
I need some batteries
aminmoh29/10/2019 11:49

They're horrible quality 3 of them last as long as 1 of these


Poundland Kodak Alkalines do very well in tests. Ikea ones are good too at £2.25 for 10. Can't really see how £4.50 for 10 is a good deal unless you're particularly into big brands.
Dodge6229/10/2019 11:58

Poundland Kodak Alkalines do very well in tests. Ikea ones are good too at …Poundland Kodak Alkalines do very well in tests. Ikea ones are good too at £2.25 for 10. Can't really see how £4.50 for 10 is a good deal unless you're particularly into big brands.


Hmm the kodak batteries normally only last a few hours for me on my xbox controller, but these last days. Guess I've just been unlucky
Are they goid
aminmoh29/10/2019 12:01

Hmm the kodak batteries normally only last a few hours for me on my xbox …Hmm the kodak batteries normally only last a few hours for me on my xbox controller, but these last days. Guess I've just been unlucky



The alkaline 4-for-a-pound ones, or the 10-packs of zinc ones? Zinc are pretty much useless in anything but ultra low-drain devices (like remote controls).
Dodge6229/10/2019 12:03

The alkaline 4-for-a-pound ones, or the 10-packs of zinc ones? Zinc are …The alkaline 4-for-a-pound ones, or the 10-packs of zinc ones? Zinc are pretty much useless in anything but ultra low-drain devices (like remote controls).


10 pack ones actually you're right!!
Why can't batteries be sold on how much energy is stored? That would surely resolve all the debate.
peroxidase29/10/2019 12:35

Why can't batteries be sold on how much energy is stored? That would …Why can't batteries be sold on how much energy is stored? That would surely resolve all the debate.


Very true, it is hard to compare objectively!
peroxidase29/10/2019 12:35

Why can't batteries be sold on how much energy is stored? That would …Why can't batteries be sold on how much energy is stored? That would surely resolve all the debate.


Because there's no standard measure. The total energy given out depends very much on the current drawn. If you draw a high current you'll get much less total capacity than if you draw a lower current. And leaving it to rest between draws will give you more energy than a continuous draw. And, of course, unscrupulous manufacturers and sellers would just lie about it, like they do with lumens output from torches and capacity of power banks (50,000mAh power bank for a tenner, anyone?)

Would be good if someone came up with a standard test, though.
With rechargeables now so cheap, which are generally a higher capacity and longer lasting than even the best alkalines, it really makes sense to never buy zinc batteries (they really should be banned), and only use alkalines in long term applications like remote controls, clocks, wireless thermostats etc.
No point buying these when poundland are 6 for a quid. They will last just as long.
Dodge6229/10/2019 13:56

Because there's no standard measure. The total energy given out depends …Because there's no standard measure. The total energy given out depends very much on the current drawn. If you draw a high current you'll get much less total capacity than if you draw a lower current. And leaving it to rest between draws will give you more energy than a continuous draw. And, of course, unscrupulous manufacturers and sellers would just lie about it, like they do with lumens output from torches and capacity of power banks (50,000mAh power bank for a tenner, anyone?)Would be good if someone came up with a standard test, though.



You could surely make it compulsory to quote lifetimes at various current draw, ie 1000 mah, 1 hour, 500mah, 100mah at least so people could have an idea. NiMHs a capacity anyway, which also depends on drain (though they don't suffer as badly as alkalines).
The reason they don't though, is more likely because all alkaline batteries are pretty much the same.
Edited by: "SFconvert" 29th Oct
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