10 Metres of Cellophane £1 @ Poundland
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10 Metres of Cellophane £1 @ Poundland

22
Posted 6th NovAvailable: National, South East, South, South West, London, East of England, West Midlands, East Midlands, Yorkshire & Lincolnshire, North West, North East, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland
This can be pretty expensive, They don’t seem to have this all year around in my local so worth grabbing now if it’s something you plan to use at Christmas.
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i KNOW this forum is not about sustainability or being eco-aware... however, is there perhaps room for a place on here to just rate how sustainable a deal may be? this deal feels mega-UN-sustainable... gift baskets look just as ace using tissue paper, which hobbycraft sells eco-friendly forms of for v little £’s.
ok, i’ll see myself out...
22 Comments
Picked some up last week, they also have rolls with a frosted pattern on them.
How wide is it?
Great price!
OMG just exactly what I'm looking to buy for gift baskets. Thanks OP.
Are you sure the price is correct?
jaymzie00706/11/2019 19:51

Are you sure the price is correct?


Yes, I often buy it from Poundland! They do clear usually, or another one with white spots on, both for £1.
i KNOW this forum is not about sustainability or being eco-aware... however, is there perhaps room for a place on here to just rate how sustainable a deal may be? this deal feels mega-UN-sustainable... gift baskets look just as ace using tissue paper, which hobbycraft sells eco-friendly forms of for v little £’s.
ok, i’ll see myself out...
Find it in Stationary, not with the rest of wrapping paper. Took me ages to find it as someone had parked a full sized pram in front!
floweritup06/11/2019 19:56

i KNOW this forum is not about sustainability or being eco-aware... …i KNOW this forum is not about sustainability or being eco-aware... however, is there perhaps room for a place on here to just rate how sustainable a deal may be? this deal feels mega-UN-sustainable... gift baskets look just as ace using tissue paper, which hobbycraft sells eco-friendly forms of for v little £’s.ok, i’ll see myself out...


I agree. You can get biodegradable cellophane, it’s quite thin and I found it tore quite easily but hopefully it’s a product that becomes a norm in the future
It’s great for small hampers/gifts but not very handy for medium size baskets. I managed to get a normal roll multipack cheap in the works and hobbycraft last year in the sales. I also remember Lidl got some in one year as part of their Christmas special buys, and that’s a wider roll
This makes me think of people who wrap their suitcase at the airport
I cannot think of a single use I would have for cellophane, I wouldn't even eat food that had been wrapped in it after I found out it leaches chemicals onto anything it touches. I suspect years from now someone will prove it gave them cancer and that will be the end of it.
jumpinoffthbed07/11/2019 01:50

This makes me think of people who wrap their suitcase at the airport …This makes me think of people who wrap their suitcase at the airport I cannot think of a single use I would have for cellophane, I wouldn't even eat food that had been wrapped in it after I found out it leaches chemicals onto anything it touches. I suspect years from now someone will prove it gave them cancer and that will be the end of it.


At least attempt to post some verifiably scientific sources if you're going to claim nonsense like that. "Leaching" might have been a concern years ago when wrap was still made from PVC. Now any food-related wrap is polyethylene-based, which - by the way - is the same stuff which the vast majority of new tap water supply pipes are made from.
ruffedgrouse07/11/2019 03:12

At least attempt to post some verifiably scientific sources if you're …At least attempt to post some verifiably scientific sources if you're going to claim nonsense like that. "Leaching" might have been a concern years ago when wrap was still made from PVC. Now any food-related wrap is polyethylene-based, which - by the way - is the same stuff which the vast majority of new tap water supply pipes are made from.


Lol aren't you an upperty sod, care to explain your extremely defensive demeanour over this product?
Is it beyond you to do your own research? Took me 2 seconds to find this..

as of 2006, almost all plastic wraps made in the United States are phthalate-free. Unfortunately, most are now made with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) or polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC). (The exceptions are wraps used in catering and professional kitchens.) LDPE and PVDC don’t adhere as well as plastic wraps made with PVC, but more worrying is the fact that LDPE may contain diethylhexyl adipate (DEHA), another potential endocrine disruptor that has been linked to breast cancer in women and low sperm counts in men. Since manufacturers aren’t required to list the actual chemical makeup of their plastic wrap on the boxes, consumers are at risk.

The issue of greatest concern, however, is whether plastic wrap will leach chemicals into foods when it is used to cover dishes being heated in microwave ovens. It is possible for DEHA to get into foods, particularly fatty foods such as meats and cheeses. For this reason, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises against using in the microwave any plastic wrap that is not labeled “microwave safe.” To earn this designation, a wrap must pass tests that satisfy the agency. (The same goes for plastic containers that come into contact with food.)

If you do use plastic wrap on foods heated in the microwave, be sure that the wrap is placed loosely over the container but doesn’t touch the food. Some product labels specify that there should be one inch or more between the wrap and the food in order to prevent the plastic from melting should it come into contact with hot food. Instead of plastic wrap, I advise you to use wax paper or white paper towels. Microwave food only in glass or ceramic containers.


I'm sure you'll reply with your knickers even more twisted but tbh I prob won't bother reading it
jumpinoffthbed07/11/2019 07:29

Lol aren't you an upperty sod, care to explain your extremely defensive …Lol aren't you an upperty sod, care to explain your extremely defensive demeanour over this product?Is it beyond you to do your own research? Took me 2 seconds to find this..as of 2006, almost all plastic wraps made in the United States are phthalate-free. Unfortunately, most are now made with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) or polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC). (The exceptions are wraps used in catering and professional kitchens.) LDPE and PVDC don’t adhere as well as plastic wraps made with PVC, but more worrying is the fact that LDPE may contain diethylhexyl adipate (DEHA), another potential endocrine disruptor that has been linked to breast cancer in women and low sperm counts in men. Since manufacturers aren’t required to list the actual chemical makeup of their plastic wrap on the boxes, consumers are at risk.The issue of greatest concern, however, is whether plastic wrap will leach chemicals into foods when it is used to cover dishes being heated in microwave ovens. It is possible for DEHA to get into foods, particularly fatty foods such as meats and cheeses. For this reason, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises against using in the microwave any plastic wrap that is not labeled “microwave safe.” To earn this designation, a wrap must pass tests that satisfy the agency. (The same goes for plastic containers that come into contact with food.)If you do use plastic wrap on foods heated in the microwave, be sure that the wrap is placed loosely over the container but doesn’t touch the food. Some product labels specify that there should be one inch or more between the wrap and the food in order to prevent the plastic from melting should it come into contact with hot food. Instead of plastic wrap, I advise you to use wax paper or white paper towels. Microwave food only in glass or ceramic containers.I'm sure you'll reply with your knickers even more twisted but tbh I prob won't bother reading it


Do you live in the USA?
Let's hope my local PL had them in!
jumpinoffthbed07/11/2019 07:29

Lol aren't you an upperty sod, care to explain your extremely defensive …Lol aren't you an upperty sod, care to explain your extremely defensive demeanour over this product?Is it beyond you to do your own research? Took me 2 seconds to find this..as of 2006, almost all plastic wraps made in the United States are phthalate-free. Unfortunately, most are now made with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) or polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC). (The exceptions are wraps used in catering and professional kitchens.) LDPE and PVDC don’t adhere as well as plastic wraps made with PVC, but more worrying is the fact that LDPE may contain diethylhexyl adipate (DEHA), another potential endocrine disruptor that has been linked to breast cancer in women and low sperm counts in men. Since manufacturers aren’t required to list the actual chemical makeup of their plastic wrap on the boxes, consumers are at risk.The issue of greatest concern, however, is whether plastic wrap will leach chemicals into foods when it is used to cover dishes being heated in microwave ovens. It is possible for DEHA to get into foods, particularly fatty foods such as meats and cheeses. For this reason, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises against using in the microwave any plastic wrap that is not labeled “microwave safe.” To earn this designation, a wrap must pass tests that satisfy the agency. (The same goes for plastic containers that come into contact with food.)If you do use plastic wrap on foods heated in the microwave, be sure that the wrap is placed loosely over the container but doesn’t touch the food. Some product labels specify that there should be one inch or more between the wrap and the food in order to prevent the plastic from melting should it come into contact with hot food. Instead of plastic wrap, I advise you to use wax paper or white paper towels. Microwave food only in glass or ceramic containers.I'm sure you'll reply with your knickers even more twisted but tbh I prob won't bother reading it


>> "advises against using in the microwave any plastic wrap that is not labeled “microwave safe.”

Duh.
floweritup06/11/2019 19:56

i KNOW this forum is not about sustainability or being eco-aware... …i KNOW this forum is not about sustainability or being eco-aware... however, is there perhaps room for a place on here to just rate how sustainable a deal may be? this deal feels mega-UN-sustainable... gift baskets look just as ace using tissue paper, which hobbycraft sells eco-friendly forms of for v little £’s.ok, i’ll see myself out...



Every time I see comments like that I make a mental note to throw a handful of plastic out of the window next time I'm driving in the countryside. I'm probably not the only one who pushes back either.
I just wanted you to know why I'll do it this time. Thanks.
I’m gonna buy some just for the hell of it.
Make.Amazon.Great.Again07/11/2019 17:23

Every time I see comments like that I make a mental note to throw a …Every time I see comments like that I make a mental note to throw a handful of plastic out of the window next time I'm driving in the countryside. I'm probably not the only one who pushes back either.I just wanted you to know why I'll do it this time. Thanks.


struggling to see the point of this bafflingly rude and thoughtless comment...
Make.Amazon.Great.Again07/11/2019 17:23

Every time I see comments like that I make a mental note to throw a …Every time I see comments like that I make a mental note to throw a handful of plastic out of the window next time I'm driving in the countryside. I'm probably not the only one who pushes back either.I just wanted you to know why I'll do it this time. Thanks.


You should probably confide this with your social worker rather than on here
"10 Metres of Cellophane". New Emo band ?
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