10 Year Mortgages from TSB 2.34% fixed for ten years 60% LTV £995 fee or no fee but pay 2.44%. Appears its the same rate for first time buyers
403°Expired

10 Year Mortgages from TSB 2.34% fixed for ten years 60% LTV £995 fee or no fee but pay 2.44%. Appears its the same rate for first time buyers

61
Found 24th Jan
10 year fixed rate mortgages for moving home and first time buyers. A fixed rate mortgage means your mortgage payments stay the same during the fixed rate period so they're easier to manage. A ten year fixed term gives you that comfort for a longer period, so you'll know exactly where you stand.


For loans of up to 60% of the purchase price or valuation of the property, whichever is lower.

2.34% fixed until 30 April 2028 Homeowner Variable Rate, currently 3.99% 3.0% APRC £995 For loans between £5,000 and £1,000,000.

2.44% fixed until 30 April 2028 Homeowner Variable Rate, currently 3.99% 3.0% APRC £0 For loans between £5,000 and £1,000,000.
No product fee

For loans of between 60% and 75% of the purchase price or valuation of the property, whichever is lower.

2.49% fixed until 30 April 2028 Homeowner Variable Rate, currently 3.99% 3.1% APRC£995 For loans between £5,000 and £1,000,000.

2.59% fixed until 30 April 2028 Homeowner Variable Rate, currently 3.99% 3.1% APRC £0 For loans between £5,000 and £1,000,000.
No product fee
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61 Comments
I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their customer. Thought to maintain my custom for another 8 years they would put me on this deal.

Nope we will charge you the exit fee.

Yes but i'm not leaving you in effect i'm extending my mortgage by 8 years. Nope they will charge the fees. Ok i'll wait till the end and will definitely not use TSB when remortgage.

Any other company like BT will extend your contract if you stay! Seems mortgages are different
Anon325 m ago

I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their …I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their customer. Thought to maintain my custom for another 8 years they would put me on this deal. Nope we will charge you the exit fee. Yes but i'm not leaving you in effect i'm extending my mortgage by 8 years. Nope they will charge the fees. Ok i'll wait till the end and will definitely not use TSB when remortgage. Any other company like BT will extend your contract if you stay! Seems mortgages are different


I know it's stupid. I did the exact same thing and left Santander because they're too stupid to see the value of customer loyalty.
Anon3219 m ago

I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their …I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their customer. Thought to maintain my custom for another 8 years they would put me on this deal. Nope we will charge you the exit fee. Yes but i'm not leaving you in effect i'm extending my mortgage by 8 years. Nope they will charge the fees. Ok i'll wait till the end and will definitely not use TSB when remortgage. Any other company like BT will extend your contract if you stay! Seems mortgages are different


"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs virtually nothing for BT to provide you with a service, therefore, they can offer you a discount to maintain customer loyalty and still make a profit. Whereas the bank has to borrow the money for the mortgage, and they will account for paying it back over the period. The best thing to do is get a mortgage that gives you what you want in the first place - so if you want flexibility to move with no fees after 3 years, then get one that has no fees for early repayment.
M_z7 m ago

"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs …"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs virtually nothing for BT to provide you with a service, therefore, they can offer you a discount to maintain customer loyalty and still make a profit. Whereas the bank has to borrow the money for the mortgage, and they will account for paying it back over the period. The best thing to do is get a mortgage that gives you what you want in the first place - so if you want flexibility to move with no fees after 3 years, then get one that has no fees for early repayment.


I was making a point. Hence why i said they are different. I also detect a bit of arrogance in your post. Banks do less work than BT? Are you suggesting their network doesn't need money spent on it? Banks give interest to savers to get money hardly lifting a finger to me. Or they borrow it from the BoE for .5% making a substational profit. For just relending the money. And yes mortgages are different than landline provision!
Anon3227 m ago

I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their …I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their customer. Thought to maintain my custom for another 8 years they would put me on this deal. Nope we will charge you the exit fee. Yes but i'm not leaving you in effect i'm extending my mortgage by 8 years. Nope they will charge the fees. Ok i'll wait till the end and will definitely not use TSB when remortgage. Any other company like BT will extend your contract if you stay! Seems mortgages are different


Mortgages are completely different in the way they are financed.
TSB would have sold X amount of your current mortgage deal against X amount of savings/investments, if they then let you out of the mortgage early to go into another deal (which will be financed against different investments) they wouldn’t have the income to return to the initial investors. It’s how banking works.

These seems mike decent deals however 10 year fix for first time buyers is insane. Most will move 2 or 3 times in 10 years and this will leave them locked in with TSB or paying large early repayment fees.
Good for some but need to consider what’s best in the long run.
M_z12 m ago

"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs …"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs virtually nothing for BT to provide you with a service, therefore, they can offer you a discount to maintain customer loyalty and still make a profit. Whereas the bank has to borrow the money for the mortgage, and they will account for paying it back over the period. The best thing to do is get a mortgage that gives you what you want in the first place - so if you want flexibility to move with no fees after 3 years, then get one that has no fees for early repayment.


Amen. Don’t take a 5 year mortgage if you don’t want a 5 year mortgage. Ps I’m in the same boat with my provider. 1 year into a 2 year mortgage and opportunity has come up. Even staying with same lender they want £3500 redemption penalty. But it’s in the contract, so I understand this.
I won't claim to know how everything works but this site is about helping people and it was just something that i noticed. Extra 8 years means more money for them and they wouldn't be lending me anymore money would they. And lets not forget 2009!TSB has probably sold my mortgage to soneone else already so they got their money back.
Anon3214 m ago

I was making a point. Hence why i said they are different. I also detect a …I was making a point. Hence why i said they are different. I also detect a bit of arrogance in your post. Banks do less work than BT? Are you suggesting their network doesn't need money spent on it? Banks give interest to savers to get money hardly lifting a finger to me. Or they borrow it from the BoE for .5% making a substational profit. For just relending the money. And yes mortgages are different than landline provision!


It's about the marginal cost of delivery though - 1 additional BT customer will cost them virtually nothing.
M_z30 m ago

"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs …"Seems mortgages are different" - well they are, aren't they? It costs virtually nothing for BT to provide you with a service, therefore, they can offer you a discount to maintain customer loyalty and still make a profit. Whereas the bank has to borrow the money for the mortgage, and they will account for paying it back over the period. The best thing to do is get a mortgage that gives you what you want in the first place - so if you want flexibility to move with no fees after 3 years, then get one that has no fees for early repayment.


I would agree with you except for the fact that they don't really pay anything to borrow the money they lend out, what is the interest on deposits 0.2% a year ?? thats next to nothing most people with up to 20K will probably not even bother setting up a savings account so essentially banks have free money to lend out.
Cuddl3s5 m ago

I would agree with you except for the fact that they don't really pay …I would agree with you except for the fact that they don't really pay anything to borrow the money they lend out, what is the interest on deposits 0.2% a year ?? thats next to nothing most people with up to 20K will probably not even bother setting up a savings account so essentially banks have free money to lend out.


I'm sure that is correct, but mortgages usually involve large sums of money and a 5 year mortgage is accounted for over 5 years, and the details are all in a contract. So if an individual asks for a special deal to keep them as a customer, they can't just do it. Well, if you were worth millions, they probably could, but if you are Joe Average in a 3 bed semi like most of us, its not worth their trouble.
Anon3221 m ago

I won't claim to know how everything works but this site is about helping …I won't claim to know how everything works but this site is about helping people and it was just something that i noticed. Extra 8 years means more money for them and they wouldn't be lending me anymore money would they. And lets not forget 2009!TSB has probably sold my mortgage to soneone else already so they got their money back.


It’s helpful the share the deal for sure.

Comparing to other services doesn’t make sense though. Either does ‘extra 8 years means more money for them’ as it doesn’t. They’ll lose on what they are would be making from you in the next 2 years on the current deal meaning they are short on that side. Then on the new deal there is the potential of he rate being lower and therefore making less per month, plus the administration of the switch (it’s not a click of a button like a BT tariff)
If you can leave a current deal for a longer one what about a shorter one with a higher rate? What about if borrowing more? What about if changing from residential to buy to let or vice-versa? Has to be a fixed rule for it to work
As you all seem to know what you are talking about, what are the best interest only remortgages out there?
Cuddl3s11 m ago

I would agree with you except for the fact that they don't really pay …I would agree with you except for the fact that they don't really pay anything to borrow the money they lend out, what is the interest on deposits 0.2% a year ?? thats next to nothing most people with up to 20K will probably not even bother setting up a savings account so essentially banks have free money to lend out.


Nope. Banks can’t lend against the vast majority of what’s held in normal instant access accounts. That would make no sense as if it’s withdrawn they are stuffed!
As for savings vs borrow rates it isn’t in one hand out the other, how many people have £5k in a savings account earning 0.2%. If they could then lend it for 2% that’s a 1.8% profit. That’s £7.50 a month profit.
Minus is sending a statement and managing the savings account, having branches, online banking, call centres, paying all the bills for the customer by direct debit. Possibly sending debit cards etc etc. Then there is actually managing the mortgage. Putting a charge on he property. The risk of it not being paid back etc etc. Leaves a small bit of space for profit.
markkeenan4 m ago

As you all seem to know what you are talking about, what are the best …As you all seem to know what you are talking about, what are the best interest only remortgages out there?


Personally I wouldn’t go interest only as not good in the long term plus they tend to be harder to actually get.
An exception would be when looking at buy to let mortgages, with the way taxes are worked now interest only can make more sense if it means paying more on your own residential. I just remortgaged my BTL at 2.59% with no fees for 5 years which seemed ok. I still kept it on repayment though.
A2DY_1 m ago

Personally I wouldn’t go interest only as not good in the long term plus t …Personally I wouldn’t go interest only as not good in the long term plus they tend to be harder to actually get. An exception would be when looking at buy to let mortgages, with the way taxes are worked now interest only can make more sense if it means paying more on your own residential. I just remortgaged my BTL at 2.59% with no fees for 5 years which seemed ok. I still kept it on repayment though.


I'm on 2.19% fixed 4 years remaining. I did a hell of alot of saving before I purchased. Making it shorter term and I was comfortable.
Edited by: "snappyfish" 24th Jan
We had 8 months left on a 2 year fixed with Halifax and they waived the fees because we took out a new mortgage with them.
Which first time buyer has an LTV of 60/40. More like 90/10 so this is all BS PR.
How many 1st time buyers have 40% deposits???
ms200511 m ago

Which first time buyer has an LTV of 60/40. More like 90/10 so this is all …Which first time buyer has an LTV of 60/40. More like 90/10 so this is all BS PR.


This is not said sourly, those that have access to the Bank of Mum and Dad and live outside of the South East (or other hotspots). I could lend/give one of my kids the 40% deposit needed for a respectable 3 bed semi in the North-west. Unfortunately, it has always been the case that the best money deals are often only available to those who already have access to wealth. This is a great deal for a limited amount of folk.
Anon321 h, 43 m ago

I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their …I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their customer. Thought to maintain my custom for another 8 years they would put me on this deal. Nope we will charge you the exit fee. Yes but i'm not leaving you in effect i'm extending my mortgage by 8 years. Nope they will charge the fees. Ok i'll wait till the end and will definitely not use TSB when remortgage. Any other company like BT will extend your contract if you stay! Seems mortgages are different



You are terminating your contract early so there is a penalty charge to pay as per your t&c.
Babbler31 m ago

How many 1st time buyers have 40% deposits???


Equally, I wonder why people can't seem to get together a 5% deposit.. Perhaps too many iPhones and nights out..
winchman25 m ago

Equally, I wonder why people can't seem to get together a 5% deposit.. …Equally, I wonder why people can't seem to get together a 5% deposit.. Perhaps too many iPhones and nights out..


Well, depends on the total sum and their income, doesn't it? But on my first house 5% deposit was around 7% of what a I got paid in a year - which wasn't a lot. I suspect for most first time buyers its a lot more than that now. Its wrong to assume the worst of people, of course some people will be bad with money, just as some people have always been, but these days, saving after paying rent can make a 5% deposit years and years of living very very frugally.
Anon322 h, 38 m ago

I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their …I have about 2 years left of a 5 yr fix and went in to tsb as i'm their customer. Thought to maintain my custom for another 8 years they would put me on this deal. Nope we will charge you the exit fee. Yes but i'm not leaving you in effect i'm extending my mortgage by 8 years. Nope they will charge the fees. Ok i'll wait till the end and will definitely not use TSB when remortgage. Any other company like BT will extend your contract if you stay! Seems mortgages are different


Thanks - i was thinking of doing the same, you just saved me an hour of my life
M_z30 m ago

Well, depends on the total sum and their income, doesn't it? But on my …Well, depends on the total sum and their income, doesn't it? But on my first house 5% deposit was around 7% of what a I got paid in a year - which wasn't a lot. I suspect for most first time buyers its a lot more than that now. Its wrong to assume the worst of people, of course some people will be bad with money, just as some people have always been, but these days, saving after paying rent can make a 5% deposit years and years of living very very frugally.



If Eastern Europeans who arrived here with not a lot, with so-so English and low paid jobs, can buy in the south, I see no reason why Brits can't do the same. The only difference seems to be the mentality to save..
winchman6 m ago

If Eastern Europeans who arrived here with not a lot, with so-so English …If Eastern Europeans who arrived here with not a lot, with so-so English and low paid jobs, can buy in the south, I see no reason why Brits can't do the same. The only difference seems to be the mentality to save..


You're just making stuff up! Have a nice day.
M_z9 m ago

You're just making stuff up! Have a nice day.


I'm most definitely not making it up, in some ways I wish I was. Just think that people get easily distracted in to buying stuff, rather than focusing on saving.
M_z51 m ago

But on my first house 5% deposit was around 7% of what a I got paid in a …But on my first house 5% deposit was around 7% of what a I got paid in a year - which wasn't a lot. I suspect for most first time buyers its a lot more than that now. Its wrong to assume the worst of people, of course some people will be bad with money, just as some people have always been, but these days, saving after paying rent can make a 5% deposit years and years of living very very frugally.


Basically this. That 5% deposit is more like 50% of annual income (BEFORE tax) for me. And let's not forget the £1k+ rent a month we have to pay in the South. I'm not bitter- we'll do it one day, but it's just not as easy as some people seem to think it is. I suspect those people bought houses when they were a lot cheaper and banks a lot freer with their mortgages, the days when you could get 100% or even 110% LTV mortgages.
In my group of friends the only ones who have purchased houses have done it either with their parents help or with inheritance money. I don't want to ask my parents for money and I don't have any rich relatives close to popping their clogs.

Came on here to comment how silly it is offering a 'first time buyer' mortgage at 60% LTV but that's already been pointed out!
Sammykate20 m ago

Basically this. That 5% deposit is more like 50% of annual income (BEFORE …Basically this. That 5% deposit is more like 50% of annual income (BEFORE tax) for me. And let's not forget the £1k+ rent a month we have to pay in the South. I'm not bitter- we'll do it one day, but it's just not as easy as some people seem to think it is. I suspect those people bought houses when they were a lot cheaper and banks a lot freer with their mortgages, the days when you could get 100% or even 110% LTV mortgages.In my group of friends the only ones who have purchased houses have done it either with their parents help or with inheritance money. I don't want to ask my parents for money and I don't have any rich relatives close to popping their clogs.Came on here to comment how silly it is offering a 'first time buyer' mortgage at 60% LTV but that's already been pointed out!


Well good luck to you. I bet yourself and friends love being told by those who have been a bit luckier with house prices that all you need to do is not have a mobile phone ...
winchman2 h, 12 m ago

Equally, I wonder why people can't seem to get together a 5% deposit.. …Equally, I wonder why people can't seem to get together a 5% deposit.. Perhaps too many iPhones and nights out..



Or maybe... just maybe... rent prices have spiralled up to cost MORE than a mortgage would. And cost of living rising faster than wages... and - if you do get near 5% - prices then carry on rising mean you need more for a 5% deposit... unless of course you are lucky to live in an outskirt of the country where prices haven't moved for a few years...
Struggling to find on their page if their mortgages are portable. Anyone know?? Thanks...
BEWARE: In the next few years (within 5 years, but more likely around the time of the next US election), the US dollar and global debt market will completely collapse. Never in man's recorded history as there been so much debt fueling the world economy, and the resulting collapse will make 1920's Germany look like a minor inconvenience. The "2008 crisis" was not a crisis in and of itself, it was merely the first toxic symptom of the debt bubble rearing its ugly head. It was merely covered up, temporarily, by the Central Banks' "QE". Translation, Central Banks created fake money out of thin air to keep the party going a bit longer. The Bank of England has now begun the process of increasing interest rates. China no longer uses the petrodollar, but buys its oil from Russia in Chinese Yuan. Saudia Arabia, Qatar and other nations are following suit (Gadaffi in Libya and Saddam in Iraq both tried this and look what happened there). The governments of China, Russia and India are buying unprecedented amounts of physical gold. READ: If you have VARIABLE RATE debt when the collapse occurs, you will be swiftly wiped out. Homeless. If you have FIXED RATE debt, your bank can (read the small print of your contract) issue a six month notification of a rate rise in line with inflation. At the point of a collapse on this scale, WHERE EVER YOUR VALUE LIES, THAT IS WHERE IT WILL REMAIN. Nobody will be buying. You will be stuck. Despite the constant signs of economic turmoil in the media, many of you will read this and still choose to buy large amounts of debt in 2018. Maybe you'll catch the news of these little North Italian banks going under, and still, you will be completely ignorant. You won't ask why this is happening, despite the daily news stories of the death rattle of the NHS and pension funds getting into trouble. Unfortunately for the vast majority of people, this will only become a reality when the dreaded letter arrives from their mortgage issuer. Or there are lines outside banks for withdrawals a la Cyprus. Or the credit lines to the supermarkets have stopped, and the just-in-time delivery system has ground to a halt. To the few who have read this far, and are curious to find out more for themselves, I recommend Lynette Zang over on "ITS Trading" on youtube as a starting point. She is a career banker and speaks very plainly about what to expect.
Edited by: "Zlorf" 24th Jan
When banks give you a mortgage the money they lend you is not financed through deposits it’s actually made up out of thin air. Look it up on the net, it’s a right eye opener.
spik3_my_drink5 h, 10 m ago

I know it's stupid. I did the exact same thing and left Santander because …I know it's stupid. I did the exact same thing and left Santander because they're too stupid to see the value of customer loyalty.


They take us for mugs!! We fatten them up and they f%*K us up. What a horrible capitalistic system
alkydale4 h, 11 m ago

We had 8 months left on a 2 year fixed with Halifax and they waived the …We had 8 months left on a 2 year fixed with Halifax and they waived the fees because we took out a new mortgage with them.


Well thats what i thought. You have two years left can i take out a new ten yr mortgage. Yes sir as they keep your custom and interest. They are not lending you more money. But got shot down in flames. I suppose its best just to ask your bank and see what they do. If not then go elsewhere and let them lose your custom.
harry12345678940 m ago

When banks give you a mortgage the money they lend you is not financed …When banks give you a mortgage the money they lend you is not financed through deposits it’s actually made up out of thin air. Look it up on the net, it’s a right eye opener.


Of course.

if money can be plucked out of the air from no where then why would they ever refuse a mortgage? They can’t lose?

i think it’s you interpret it as ‘out of thin air’ you may just have understood it correctly.

You may be getting mixed up with quantative easing which in essence is making money from nothing however only the government can do that and it just devalues all other money in the economy so not something that would be used for everyone’s mortgage!
Zlorf57 m ago

BEWARE: In the next few years (within 5 years, but more likely around the …BEWARE: In the next few years (within 5 years, but more likely around the time of the next US election), the US dollar and global debt market will completely collapse. Never in man's recorded history as there been so much debt fueling the world economy, and the resulting collapse will make 1920's Germany look like a minor inconvenience. The "2008 crisis" was not a crisis in and of itself, it was merely the first toxic symptom of the debt bubble rearing its ugly head. It was merely covered up, temporarily, by the Central Banks' "QE". Translation, Central Banks created fake money out of thin air to keep the party going a bit longer. The Bank of England has now begun the process of increasing interest rates. China no longer uses the petrodollar, but buys its oil from Russia in Chinese Yuan. Saudia Arabia, Qatar and other nations are following suit (Gadaffi in Libya and Saddam in Iraq both tried this and look what happened there). The governments of China, Russia and India are buying unprecedented amounts of physical gold. READ: If you have VARIABLE RATE debt when the collapse occurs, you will be swiftly wiped out. Homeless. If you have FIXED RATE debt, your bank can (read the small print of your contract) issue a six month notification of a rate rise in line with inflation. At the point of a collapse on this scale, WHERE EVER YOUR VALUE LIES, THAT IS WHERE IT WILL REMAIN. Nobody will be buying. You will be stuck. Despite the constant signs of economic turmoil in the media, many of you will read this and still choose to buy large amounts of debt in 2018. Maybe you'll catch the news of these little North Italian banks going under, and still, you will be completely ignorant. You won't ask why this is happening, despite the daily news stories of the death rattle of the NHS and pension funds getting into trouble. Unfortunately for the vast majority of people, this will only become a reality when the dreaded letter arrives from their mortgage issuer. Or there are lines outside banks for withdrawals a la Cyprus. Or the credit lines to the supermarkets have stopped, and the just-in-time delivery system has ground to a halt. To the few who have read this far, and are curious to find out more for themselves, I recommend Lynette Zang over on "ITS Trading" on youtube as a starting point. She is a career banker and speaks very plainly about what to expect.


So what would you advise? Shall I go live in the woods with a tin foil hat?
harry12345678955 m ago

When banks give you a mortgage the money they lend you is not financed …When banks give you a mortgage the money they lend you is not financed through deposits it’s actually made up out of thin air. Look it up on the net, it’s a right eye opener.



Not quite correct. They can create a loan (and a deposit) without having the finance in place but they would have to obtain those funds at a later date. Otherwise, when the mortgage funds were withdrawn from the deposit account, the banks reserves would reduce. That would not be sustainable.
A2DY_42 m ago

So what would you advise? Shall I go live in the woods with a tin foil hat?


No, just don't go getting into massive amounts of mortgage debt, or any other kinds of debt. For advice, I would check out somebody like Lynette Zang on youtube as a starting point. Look for someone who has had inside experience (she was a trader in 1987), and try to find someone who advocates financial solutions to preserve your wealth "outside"of the debt markets. Once you've found somebody you trust, hold the sassy tinfoil hat comments, and listen. I'm not the expert.
Edited by: "Zlorf" 24th Jan
Zlorf1 m ago

No, just don't go getting into massive amounts of mortgage debt, or any …No, just don't go getting into massive amounts of mortgage debt, or any other kinds of debt.


Phew. Had me worried for a bit.
Zlorf51 m ago

No, just don't go getting into massive amounts of mortgage debt, or any …No, just don't go getting into massive amounts of mortgage debt, or any other kinds of debt. For advice, I would check out somebody like Lynette Zang on youtube as a starting point. Look for someone who has had inside experience (she was a trader in 1987), and try to find someone who advocates financial solutions to preserve your wealth "outside"of the debt markets. Once you've found somebody you trust, hold the sassy tinfoil hat comments, and listen. I'm not the expert.


Unfortunately with the rise in property prices, getting into massive amounts of debt is unavoidable for first time buyers in particular. You're probably right about the debt bubble close to bursting but people still have to get on with their lives and hope your doomsday theory doesn't come to fruition soon. I'm fortunate to be in a position of minimal debt, but if I moved from where I am now to where I would like to be, closer to son's school, my mortgage will be 100K more than now and I'll fall in the same bracket as a FTB..
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