12.5" Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 2in1 Ultrabook, FHD IPS TouchScreen, 2.6GHz i7 5600U, 8GB DDR3, 256GB SSD, Win7 Pro+Win8 + Free Delivery, 2 year Warranty and some accessories such as backpack and Internet Security and Next Day Delivery £667.40 @ Scan
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12.5" Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 2in1 Ultrabook, FHD IPS TouchScreen, 2.6GHz i7 5600U, 8GB DDR3, 256GB SSD, Win7 Pro+Win8 + Free Delivery, 2 year Warranty and some accessories such as backpack and Internet Security and Next Day Delivery £667.40 @ Scan

£667.40Scan Deals
21
Found 10th May 2016
Seems like a good deal for a high end Lenovo convertible. These are in excess of £1000 elsewhere that I have seen.

Recently listed on HUKD priced at £700 less the extras on offer:

hotukdeals.com/dea…123

Spec below;

CPU Type: Intel Core i7 5600U
Screen Size: 12.5" IPS 10 Point MultiTouch screen
Resolution: 1920x1080
Memory: 8GB (1x8GB)
SSD Capacity: 256 GB SSD
Graphics Chipset: Intel HD Graphics 5500
I/O: 1 x Mini HDMI
I/O: 2 x USB 3.0
I/O: 1 x WiFi 802.11ac/Bluetooth 4.0 Module
Webcam: Yes
Keyboard Type/Language: Chiclet Keys / English (UK) Language / White LED
Colour: Black
Operating System: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit + Windows 8 Pro 64-bit DG
Dimensions : 316 x 19 x 221 mm (WxHxD)
Weight (Inc. Battery): 1.58 kg
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Specs for anyone wondering

CPU Type: Intel Core i7 5600U
Screen Size: 12.5" IPS 10 Point MultiTouch screen
Resolution: 1920x1080
Memory: 8GB (1x8GB)
SSD Capacity: 256 GB SSD
Graphics Chipset: Intel HD Graphics 5500
I/O: 1 x Mini HDMI
I/O: 2 x USB 3.0
I/O: 1 x WiFi 802.11ac/Bluetooth 4.0 Module
Webcam: Yes
Keyboard Type/Language: Chiclet Keys / English (UK) Language / White LED
Colour: Black
Operating System: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit + Windows 8 Pro 64-bit DG
Dimensions : 316 x 19 x 221 mm (WxHxD)
Weight (Inc. Battery): 1.58 kg

OP: I can't help but think if you'd have gone for the pure specs rather than the marketing blurb that this might have done a bit better.
To be fair it does seem to be over 1k everywhere else. Not saying that's good value, though.

Using a ThinkPad at work that I really don't like, I'm not keen but my mate had the ultra slim one for work and it was a lovely thing - this seems to be somewhere in between.

Price seems good for the spec though, hot.
Original Poster
Astec123

Specs for anyone wonderingCPU Type: Intel Core i7 5600U Screen Size: … Specs for anyone wonderingCPU Type: Intel Core i7 5600U Screen Size: 12.5" IPS 10 Point MultiTouch screenResolution: 1920x1080 Memory: 8GB (1x8GB) SSD Capacity: 256 GB SSD Graphics Chipset: Intel HD Graphics 5500 I/O: 1 x Mini HDMI I/O: 2 x USB 3.0 I/O: 1 x WiFi 802.11ac/Bluetooth 4.0 ModuleWebcam: YesKeyboard Type/Language: Chiclet Keys / English (UK) Language / White LED Colour: Black Operating System: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit + Windows 8 Pro 64-bit DG Dimensions : 316 x 19 x 221 mm (WxHxD)Weight (Inc. Battery): 1.58 kgOP: I can't help but think if you'd have gone for the pure specs rather than the marketing blurb that this might have done a bit better.



You're right, as a first time poster it was a schoolboy error on my behalf but I have amended, thanks!!
BOTASOJ

You're right, as a first time poster it was a schoolboy error on my … You're right, as a first time poster it was a schoolboy error on my behalf but I have amended, thanks!!



No problem. It's an error many people make on their first deal. Sadly HUKD doesn't really have a good way to manage large blocks of text in an easy to read way, so just pure specs generally is best. There's nothing to stop you replying to your own deal with the marketing stuff or even better using the quote function to list it as this is by default minimised but easy to access for anyone that wants to read it. It's also a great place to put links like you have to previous postings of the same item or links to reviews etc as they become clickable. It all helps to sell your deal to the masses in my experience.
Edited by: "Astec123" 11th May 2016
That's an excellent price, paid more than that for my Dell 13 2-in-1 and this has way better specs and a real CPU not this CoreM nonsense.
What does it mean by win 7 and win 8?
Is there anyone who owns one of these who can comment as to the battery life? Reviews don't really say anything conclusive. Also I've read the screen isn't particularly good? Still tempted for the price.
dreamz

What does it mean by win 7 and win 8?


Comes with 8 installed but the ability to downgrade to 7 I assume.
dreamz

What does it mean by win 7 and win 8?



Usually that means the license for Win 8 is also valid if running Win 7, to be honest sticking with 8 would be pointless, you'd be better downgrading or upgrading to 10 (if the free upgrade is still available).


noiren

That's an excellent price, paid more than that for my Dell 13 2-in-1 and … That's an excellent price, paid more than that for my Dell 13 2-in-1 and this has way better specs and a real CPU not this CoreM nonsense.



Lol, if you're keeping the machine near a power outlet or don't plan on using it for transatlantic flights, then i7 is probably good enough, benchmarks seem to suggest for single threaded workloads the 5Y71 version is actually almost as good as this i7 (25% slower if multithreading), but for less than 1/3 the TDP, not only for battery consumption, this is also significant in terms of heat. I've got both an i7 laptop and core M tablet, for day to day use (not encoding video or playing games) they seem comparable.

Personally I think this is almost the optimum tablet/laptop configuration, I almost always have my tablet attached to the keyboard, the extra screen size will be helpful running at that resolution - Windows scaling really isn't that great for high resolution smaller screens. You'll take a weight penalty and battery life will be lower but a pretty nice machine for the money.

mike
Dont trust BOTASOJ, he lies a lot. I know him personally.
At this price I would probably rather go for an xps 13, it is actually lighter and smaller than this, albeit not convertible.

You can pick a new one for 800£ in a recent deal or refurbs from Dell from 500£ (the old gen was 450£ cheapest I have seen).

Not saying this is a bad deal or machine, as ThinkPad it probably has really good build quality, but I would personally go that route or buy a yoga 700 for less than half price of this if you want a convertible.
I use one of these. It seems a good price, with good build quality and reasonable battery life. However, the screen quality is poor (an inferior screen coating), the touchscreen erratic and it is too heavy to use comfortably as a tablet.
i wish i had that money i would buy this right now
specs hot but lenovo you know the build is going to be cheap!!!
samiraamassoul

specs hot but lenovo you know the build is going to be cheap!!!



Never had a problem with thinkpad build quality (rather than their consumer stuff) - indeed the reason they stay so popular with programmers and computer types is how long they last.
So what spyware have Lenovo installed this time?
They hav been caught 3 times so far - see thehackernews.com/201…tml
I wouldn't trust my data to a Lenovo after all that without a complete install from scratch.
Spod

So what spyware have Lenovo installed this time?They hav been caught 3 … So what spyware have Lenovo installed this time?They hav been caught 3 times so far - see http://thehackernews.com/2015/09/lenovo-laptop-virus.htmlI wouldn't trust my data to a Lenovo after all that without a complete install from scratch.



Do you own a computer, device or software made by;

Dell - http://boingboing.net/2015/11/23/not-just-lenovo-dell-ships-co.html
HP - https://www.helpnetsecurity.com/2016/04/25/critical-flaws-hp-data-protector/
Toshiba - http://www.pcworld.com/article/3012061/security/vulnerabilities-found-in-lenovo-toshiba-dell-support-software.html
Asus - http://thehackernews.com/2016/02/asus-router-security-hack.html
Acer - http://thehackernews.com/2011/06/40000-users-data-source-codes-server-of.html
Windows - http://thehackernews.com/2016/02/windows-security-update.html

I could do for many others, they have all been embroiled in various things that mainstream press would be able to make a big issue out of and that's just a quick hack and slash job. If I had the time and interest in going into depth I could easily make a much longer list. You need to open your eyes that the mainstream media tends to want to be anti China, Lenovo being a Chinese firm. I almost guarantee that you saw Superfish in the mainstream news. I guarantee some of the arguably much bigger security issues that have hit in recent years you won't have seen on the pages of the Guardian, The Times, The Sun and the TV news. (I've tried to use recent examples from the last 12 months just to highlight the point, if I wanted to go for the biggest for the various companies I would feel I'm sensationalising it just like the press do).

Furthermore, while Lenovo bundled the software, they didn't develop it and just like software such as Nero, Symantec software the company that supplies it has an agreement to offer the software on the product being sold. The expectation being that the code is secure. Lenovo/Dell/HP/ASUS etc don't check the code, they expect it to be up to scratch. The same as you as an end user expect it to be.

Security flaws and vulnerabilities pop up on a regular basis and arguably there have been in the last 5 years a heck of a lot of other security flaws that end users generally wont have seen. The key matter is how firms deal with the aftermath of the discovery of a flaw.

https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/1319282-year-in-review-the-7-biggest-security-flaws-of-2015

http://marcrogers.org/2015/02/19/will-the-madness-never-end-komodia-ssl-certificates-are-everywhere/

I will end on the topic of Superfish and how Lenovo got a PR nightmare but all the other companies effected pretty much got off without a word being said about them outside of mentions in articles of a more technical nature eg.

arstechnica.com/sec…rs/

Edited by: "Astec123" 13th May 2016
Hot from me.
Astec123

Do you own a computer, device or software made by;Dell - … Do you own a computer, device or software made by;Dell - http://boingboing.net/2015/11/23/not-just-lenovo-dell-ships-co.htmlHP - https://www.helpnetsecurity.com/2016/04/25/critical-flaws-hp-data-protector/Toshiba - http://www.pcworld.com/article/3012061/security/vulnerabilities-found-in-lenovo-toshiba-dell-support-software.htmlAsus - http://thehackernews.com/2016/02/asus-router-security-hack.htmlAcer - http://thehackernews.com/2011/06/40000-users-data-source-codes-server-of.htmlWindows - http://thehackernews.com/2016/02/windows-security-update.htmlI could do for many others, they have all been embroiled in various things that mainstream press would be able to make a big issue out of and that's just a quick hack and slash job. If I had the time and interest in going into depth I could easily make a much longer list. You need to open your eyes that the mainstream media tends to want to be anti China, Lenovo being a Chinese firm. I almost guarantee that you saw Superfish in the mainstream news. I guarantee some of the arguably much bigger security issues that have hit in recent years you won't have seen on the pages of the Guardian, The Times, The Sun and the TV news. (I've tried to use recent examples from the last 12 months just to highlight the point, if I wanted to go for the biggest for the various companies I would feel I'm sensationalising it just like the press do).Furthermore, while Lenovo bundled the software, they didn't develop it and just like software such as Nero, Symantec software the company that supplies it has an agreement to offer the software on the product being sold. The expectation being that the code is secure. Lenovo/Dell/HP/ASUS etc don't check the code, they expect it to be up to scratch. The same as you as an end user expect it to be. Security flaws and vulnerabilities pop up on a regular basis and arguably there have been in the last 5 years a heck of a lot of other security flaws that end users generally wont have seen. The key matter is how firms deal with the aftermath of the discovery of a flaw.https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/1319282-year-in-review-the-7-biggest-security-flaws-of-2015http://marcrogers.org/2015/02/19/will-the-madness-never-end-komodia-ssl-certificates-are-everywhere/I will end on the topic of Superfish and how Lenovo got a PR nightmare but all the other companies effected pretty much got off without a word being said about them outside of mentions in articles of a more technical nature eg. http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/02/ssl-hijacker-behind-superfish-debacle-imperils-big-number-of-users/



There's a big difference between security flaws being found and bundling software which turns out to be spyware. Lenovo have been caught 3 times in 1 year - and that's just the ones we know about. That's a shocking record. So I stand by what I said - I wouldn't trust a Lenovo with its bundled software. I would do a Windows install from scratch.
Spod

There's a big difference between security flaws being found and bundling … There's a big difference between security flaws being found and bundling software which turns out to be spyware. Lenovo have been caught 3 times in 1 year - and that's just the ones we know about. That's a shocking record. So I stand by what I said - I wouldn't trust a Lenovo with its bundled software. I would do a Windows install from scratch.



Please tell me what make and model of computer you use.
Astec123

Please tell me what make and model of computer you use.



Home build deskside with CentOS Linux 7. Core I7 5820K with Asus X99 motherboard.
I also have a Google Nexus (Asus) tablet for odds and sods.

I don't see how that's relevant though.

Edited by: "Spod" 15th May 2016
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