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Seagate Desktop 8 TB External Hard Drive HDD – USB 3.0 for PC Laptop and Mac (STGY8000400) - £127.75 @ Amazon
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Seagate Desktop 8 TB External Hard Drive HDD – USB 3.0 for PC Laptop and Mac (STGY8000400) - £127.75 @ Amazon

£127.75 Free P&P FreeAmazon Deals
27
Posted 2nd Jun

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Seems like a good price, especially compared to current deals on HUKD.
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Product Description

This Seagate desktop external hard drive provides extra storage for your ever-growing collection of files. Instantly add space for more files, consolidate all of your files to a single location or free up space on your computer’s internal drive to help improve performance.

Setup is straightforward; simply plug in the included power supply and USB cable and you are ready to go. The drive is automatically recognized by your Windows operating system, so there is no software to install and nothing to configure. Saving files is easy - simply drag-and-drop.

Take advantage of the fast data transfer speeds by connecting to a USB 3.0 port. USB 3.0 is backward compatible with USB 2.0 for additional system compatibility..

System requirement :
Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7 operating system SuperSpeed USB 3.0 port (required for USB 3.0 transfer speeds or backwards compatible with USB 2.0 ports at USB 2.0 transfer speeds).

Box Contains - Seagate Desktop External Hard Drive - USB 3.0 cable - Power adapter.

  • Ideal add-on storage for your PC, Xbox One or PS4
  • Drag and drop file saving, right out of the box
  • System requirement :Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7 operating system SuperSpeed USB 3.0 port (required for USB 3.0 transfer speeds or backwards compatible with USB 2.0 ports at USB 2.0 transfer speeds)
  • Mains powered

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27 Comments
Over 2 weeks ago, should be fine.
ms8403/06/2020 00:05

Posted here …Posted here https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/seagate-8-tb-expansion-amazon-special-edition-usb-30-desktop-external-hard-drive-for-pc-xbox-one-ps4-12775-delivered-at-amazon-3456504

Anyone know which drive it has internally and is it removable?

I usually buy the cheaper external hdds and remove the internal drive to save some money, though lately some manufacturers stopped using regular sata hdds inside and put in a custom proprietary drive.
FYI

From Techspot's article titled "HDD manufacturers found selling slow SMR drives unsuitable for NAS RAID environments"

Update (4/22): Seagate reached out to TechSpot and clarified that it does not market SMR-based hard drives as NAS drives.
"Seagate confirms that we do not utilize Shingled Magnetic Recording technology (SMR) in any IronWolf or IronWolf Pro drives."
The company's Barracuda 8TB (ST8000DM004) and 5TB Desktop (ST500DM000) were previously called out for using SMR without specifying the tech, however, the drives are not aimed at NAS consumers and should be treated as such.

todr; Apparently this external contains the 8TB ST8000DM004 which is SMR according to Seagate because they are for end users and not for use in a NAS
joshuamfawcett03/06/2020 01:31

Anyone know which drive it has internally and is it removable? I usually …Anyone know which drive it has internally and is it removable? I usually buy the cheaper external hdds and remove the internal drive to save some money, though lately some manufacturers stopped using regular sata hdds inside and put in a custom proprietary drive.


I've shucked a good few of these. Inside is likely to be a ST8000DM004 which is a 5400rpm Seagate BarraCuda SMR drive. There is a very slim chance it could also be a Seagate Archive drive which would also be SMR but that is rare.

I have not come across any non-SATA "custom proprietary drives" in any Seagate or Western Digital external drives I have shucked. Do you have any examples?
includenull03/06/2020 05:58

I have not come across any non-SATA "custom proprietary drives" in any …I have not come across any non-SATA "custom proprietary drives" in any Seagate or Western Digital external drives I have shucked.


Just want to clarify that, for posterity, your observation is correct when talking about "desktop" (3.5 in) external drives only.

Most, if not all, current WD "portable" (2.5 in) external products have USB built-in to the drive board and do not have a SATA interface. Seagate, on the other hand, make portable drives that are essentially conventional 2.5in sata drives inside a USB caddy.
joshuamfawcett03/06/2020 01:31

Anyone know which drive it has internally and is it removable?


They are always shuckable but this isn't even a good price for £/GB.
Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're cheap. I use to always buy HGST by Hitachi until they got took over by WD. If you have to buy Seagate, buy Ironwolf NAS Enterprise editions, I wouldn't trust the consumer spec Seagate drives.
joshuamfawcett03/06/2020 01:31

Anyone know which drive it has internally and is it removable? I usually …Anyone know which drive it has internally and is it removable? I usually buy the cheaper external hdds and remove the internal drive to save some money, though lately some manufacturers stopped using regular sata hdds inside and put in a custom proprietary drive.


You're talking about the fact that many drives now have a USB connection right on the PCB, as opposed to using a SATA-USB adapter.

While this does make them harder to use as internal drives, I would hardly call USB "custom proprietary".
SMRs not for me.
My 3GB Seagate just failed after 2 years. Super annoyed. So I will probably avoid this one.
On that note, anyone have any experience with recovery?
Well I hadn’t heard of SMR until I saw this post. Now I have read up on it and I don’t like it! It’s like a VHS video really!
abulkasam03/06/2020 13:40

My 3GB Seagate just failed after 2 years. Super annoyed. So I will …My 3GB Seagate just failed after 2 years. Super annoyed. So I will probably avoid this one. On that note, anyone have any experience with recovery?


Failed how? No power? Not spinning up? Clicking noises?
iamqwerty12303/06/2020 10:34

Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're …Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're cheap. I use to always buy HGST by Hitachi until they got took over by WD. If you have to buy Seagate, buy Ironwolf NAS Enterprise editions, I wouldn't trust the consumer spec Seagate drives.


There isn't a lot of "reliable" HDD reliability data out there. But the data that is out there suggests that no manufacturer is uniformly more reliable than another. It completely depends on the model.

If you want high reliability, it's best to get a drive that's been in production for at least a couple of years that you can look up reliability statistics for. But being so selective like that, you'll pay a lot more per GB than going for a good deal. So really it depends on what level of redundancy you have as to whether the extra cost is worth it for the extra reliability.
iamqwerty12303/06/2020 10:34

Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're …Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're cheap. I use to always buy HGST by Hitachi until they got took over by WD. If you have to buy Seagate, buy Ironwolf NAS Enterprise editions, I wouldn't trust the consumer spec Seagate drives.



My main data drive was a 2TB Hitachi for a very long time, its been pretty reliable for around 7 years, only just started going a bit wonky. Click of death on boot, rebooted and was fine for another year or so then the same again and fine again for another.

Currently running a couple WD drives, one 3TB Blue from Amazon and a Shucked 2TB from an Elements USB drive I got from Currys. Will see how they work out in the long term
reddragon10503/06/2020 10:44

You're talking about the fact that many drives now have a USB connection …You're talking about the fact that many drives now have a USB connection right on the PCB, as opposed to using a SATA-USB adapter.While this does make them harder to use as internal drives, I would hardly call USB "custom proprietary".



Yeah a custom USB board directly mounted to the drive rather than a regular sata pcb with a seperate usb interface plugged into it.

It's common with the 2.5 drives but I have seen it with 3.5 too.
iamqwerty12303/06/2020 10:34

Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're …Seagate is the least reliable HDD manufacturer though, that's why they're cheap. I use to always buy HGST by Hitachi until they got took over by WD. If you have to buy Seagate, buy Ironwolf NAS Enterprise editions, I wouldn't trust the consumer spec Seagate drives.



I have about dozen Seagate Pipeline drives salvaged from old Sky+HD boxes, some with lots of hours, none show signs of deterioration i.e bad sectors, clicking etc. Not ideal for PC stuff speed wise as they are optimised for DVRs but they are designed for 24/7 use.

Also got a 160GB Seagate from my first laptop in 2009 still going strong after 11 years.

I obviously don't use them for super important data, just using them for an extra steam library which can easily be redownloaded if needed. If for some reason I do need to put data on them I also have them backed up with BackBlaze.
Edited by: "joshuamfawcett" 3rd Jun
turkers03/06/2020 07:48

They are always shuckable but this isn't even a good price for £/GB.



Learn something new everyday, the terms "Shuckable" and "Shucking" are new ones for me

Been doing it a while but never knew it had its own name.
Edited by: "joshuamfawcett" 3rd Jun
Boaby_wan03/06/2020 14:01

Failed how? No power? Not spinning up? Clicking noises?


It has power led. Then is making some noises not sure if it's the same as clicking noises or not.
includenull03/06/2020 05:58

I've shucked a good few of these. Inside is likely to be a ST8000DM004 …I've shucked a good few of these. Inside is likely to be a ST8000DM004 which is a 5400rpm Seagate BarraCuda SMR drive. There is a very slim chance it could also be a Seagate Archive drive which would also be SMR but that is rare.I have not come across any non-SATA "custom proprietary drives" in any Seagate or Western Digital external drives I have shucked. Do you have any examples?


I thought originally a SMR drive was an archive drive? If not what else signifies an archive drive?
turkers03/06/2020 07:48

They are always shuckable but this isn't even a good price for £/GB.


What is good £ per GB been recently? Or £ per TB?
Edited by: "S1X" 3rd Jun
S1X03/06/2020 21:40

I thought originally a SMR drive was an archive drive? If not what else …I thought originally a SMR drive was an archive drive? If not what else signifies an archive drive?


Archive was just the name of one of Segate's lines, like BarraCuda, IronWolf, SkyHawk and Exos. It was about for a while from 2013 when they decided to drop their branded names. They released things like "Desktop HDD", "NAS HDD", "Surveillance HDD" and "Archive HDD". They went back to their branded names in 2016.
I believe Exos is the successor to the Archive lines with recent models being 7200rpm CMR.

As far as I am aware all of their Archive drives were SMR and most of their standard Barracuda's are now too.

The recent controversy over SMR was sparked when it was found that WD were using SMR for their Red NAS drives and was causing RAID array rebuilds to fail.
includenull04/06/2020 05:34

Archive was just the name of one of Segate's lines, like BarraCuda, …Archive was just the name of one of Segate's lines, like BarraCuda, IronWolf, SkyHawk and Exos. It was about for a while from 2013 when they decided to drop their branded names. They released things like "Desktop HDD", "NAS HDD", "Surveillance HDD" and "Archive HDD". They went back to their branded names in 2016.I believe Exos is the successor to the Archive lines with recent models being 7200rpm CMR.As far as I am aware all of their Archive drives were SMR and most of their standard Barracuda's are now too.The recent controversy over SMR was sparked when it was found that WD were using SMR for their Red NAS drives and was causing RAID array rebuilds to fail.


Ah I see. What's confusing is that WD REDs that used to be CMR eg WD60EFRX are now SMR eg WD60EFAX.
edanfalls03/06/2020 16:19

There isn't a lot of "reliable" HDD reliability data out there. But the …There isn't a lot of "reliable" HDD reliability data out there. But the data that is out there suggests that no manufacturer is uniformly more reliable than another. It completely depends on the model.If you want high reliability, it's best to get a drive that's been in production for at least a couple of years that you can look up reliability statistics for. But being so selective like that, you'll pay a lot more per GB than going for a good deal. So really it depends on what level of redundancy you have as to whether the extra cost is worth it for the extra reliability.


100% nailed it. Great analysis.

This topic is so frequently misunderstood by people who appear to take a single month's HDD reliability testing data from one of the major testers, and then claim that the manufacturer of whichever drive is the leading in failure rates and claim all of that company's drives are poor quality.

Some of Seagate's drives are the best performing and most reliable for the price (2tb 7200rpm drives), as general consumer secondary drives anyway.

Great to see some wisdom on the topic.
Beehj8405/06/2020 21:10

This topic is so frequently misunderstood by people who appear to take a …This topic is so frequently misunderstood by people who appear to take a single month's HDD reliability testing data from one of the major testers, and then claim that the manufacturer of whichever drive is the leading in failure rates and claim all of that company's drives are poor quality.


Very true. One thing that Backblaze's statistics show is that some models tend to fail around the same time, and other models at other times. So testing drives for even a few months is meaningless, when most of them might fail in month 13, or month 19, or month 21.

And people tend to think of enterprise drives are being inherently more reliable. But usually enterprises, who are running a large number of drives with a large degree of redundancy, tend to go for cheap high performance drives, because it works out better financially for your drives to fail more quickly if they're a fair bit cheaper. Twice the failure rate doesn't mean twice the cost - a 10% failure rate instead of 5% just means an extra 5% drive cost over that period.

If you're only running one or two drives, though, then it makes sense to pay a little extra for reliability to save yourself the hassle of restoring.
Thanks OP. Ordered one since my last seagate 2TB is almost full now. That was bought in 2013. Still going strong after 7 Years. Not a single bad sector.
Don't know why people think NAS drives to be super fast. Unless you use your NAS across wired devices, there will be no issues on hard disk speed as any dumb 10 yer old hard disk will do just fine. You'll have bottlenecks in wifi.
I've used my 2TB seagate for 7 years as NAS without any issues. Stream 4K VR to my oculus quest now without any issues over 5G wifi band. 2G wifi cannot handle, no matter how fast your computer and hard disk is.
Got it last Thursday. Seems like it's auto power off mode takes bit too long. My old 2TB seagate switch off in about 15 mins of inactivity, but this one last about an hour before it switch off. Not sure this will last long as my 2TB drive due to this
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