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160A Turbo Fan Cooled Arc Welder - £39.99
160A Turbo Fan Cooled Arc Welder - £39.99

160A Turbo Fan Cooled Arc Welder - £39.99

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Complete with handle and wheels for superior mobility, this superb welder is ideal for tackling all sorts of metal repairs in and around the home from gates to fencing, garden furniture to lawnmowers, car exhausts to bodywork.

Fully adjustable output amperage 40 amps160 amps
Comprehensive kit includes: hand-held face shield, electrode holder, earth clamp, power leads, chipping hammer/wire brush, electrode starter pack (2 ?1.6mm, 2 ?2.0mm, 2 ?2.5mm, 2 ?3.2mm, 2 ?4mm)
Instruction manual and How to Weld guide
Uses 1.6mm-4.0mm diameter electrodes
Thermal overload protection

Bought it yesterday and seems like a sound piece of kit, especially for a "My First Welder". Screwfix sell an equivalent at £79.99.

23 Comments

Original Poster

http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/media/offers/08_week_38/arc_welder_Wk3811.jpg

Having absolutely no experience in welding would this be worth getting? Is it easy enough to pick up the hang of basic welding? Any online newbie guides?
I have a old metal bedframe I would practice on for use as turning into a shelving frame for the shed, I can think of 1001 uses for a welder but am put off by lack of experience.

harlzter;2973121

Having absolutely no experience in welding would this be worth getting? … Having absolutely no experience in welding would this be worth getting? Is it easy enough to pick up the hang of basic welding? Any online newbie guides? I have a old metal bedframe I would practice on for use as turning into a shelving frame for the shed, I can think of 1001 uses for a welder but am put off by lack of experience.



Welding in like most things in life , the more u try it the easier it becomes, Arc metal welding relativly easy , i learnt last year by bying a cheap one on flea bay for 10 quid,Bed frame should be no problem as long as the metal is more than 2 mm thick and not covered in a plastic coating (will give of nasty fumes), arc welder is not really any good for thin metal like car panels.I would recomend to buy a proper welding helmet (£12 from machine mark) as it dificult to weld as a beginner if you have to use one hand to hold a hand sheild, also get a proper pair of gloves.

bigjeremy;2973311

Welding in like most things in life , the more u try it the easier it … Welding in like most things in life , the more u try it the easier it becomes, Arc metal welding relativly easy , i learnt last year by bying a cheap one on flea bay for 10 quid,Bed frame should be no problem as long as the metal is more than 2 mm thick and not covered in a plastic coating (will give of nasty fumes), arc welder is not really any good for thin metal like car panels.I would recomend to buy a proper welding helmet (£12 from machine mark) as it dificult to weld as a beginner if you have to use one hand to hold a hand sheild, also get a proper pair of gloves.


Yes the frame is hefty and not plastic coated its more of a powder coated type covering, its amazing how many parts ive used from it already:thumbsup:

harlzter;2973121

Having absolutely no experience in welding would this be worth getting? … Having absolutely no experience in welding would this be worth getting? Is it easy enough to pick up the hang of basic welding? Any online newbie guides? I have a old metal bedframe I would practice on for use as turning into a shelving frame for the shed, I can think of 1001 uses for a welder but am put off by lack of experience.



Having at one time been a (coded welder) :roll: and served an apprenticeship in this craft disipline I would highly recommend you register at your local Tech college and begin a short course. This will introduce you to the main Health and safety requirments of using this piece of equipment. You would'nt just start taking your heating system apart would you?,
As you state there a loads of applications you can create using this piece of equipment, but surely you dont want to either cause damage to surrounding materials or even worse cause injury to your self.

Advice =
1. Do a short basic course on welding / Fabrication
2. Buy yourself a good quality head sceen (as mentioned)
3. Invest in a good pair of welders "Gauntlets" Very heavy gloves, well insulated.
4. Safety glasses / goggles, to prevent eye injury when chipping your **** off. :thumbsup:

Hope you have fun with your welding!

Oh by the way Very cheap welder, Voted HOT!

PS: Welder Joke= Q: Why can you not weld on the Moon?
.
.
.
A: Because..............There's no EARTH! :oops:

How would this be for exhausts? more importantly motorcycle exhaust ie welding link pipes etc?

Renegade01;2973563

Having at one time been a (coded welder) :roll: and served an … Having at one time been a (coded welder) :roll: and served an apprenticeship in this craft disipline I would highly recommend....................


Thanks for the advice mate, appreciated from a pro. I'll look into short courses, nothing too complex as it will be more a hobbyist thing than anything:thumbsup:,
Safety advice noted, as with all things - even my strimmer and edge trimmers I use a full forestry helmet then again they are 30cc ryobi's and powerful as hell and as Ive always believed eyes cannot be replaced :-)

Arc welders are not very good at thin metal as they put a lot of heat into the metal which both distorts it & tends to burn holes. They are thus fine for 2mm upwards if used carefully - a series of short welds with cooling time rather than long seem welds etc . For the thin metal in car bodywork - & I guess motor cycle exhaust systems - they are not ideal. You really need Mig & for really thin metal Tig welders. Both cost more.

As is usual & expert can weld something perfectly that a beginner would distort all over the place between the holes that they burnt through the metal.

This is fine for garden work but if you really want to weld a range of things I would save for a Mig

can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to sound ridiculous but bear with me....

I assume this works by zapping a large current (160 amps by the looks of it) at the point you want to weld which heats the point up to a temperature metals melts at.

What would happen if I had a good connection of this on both sizes of a large graphite rod (so no spark, just the current running though the rod). Would the current pass through the rod and hence heat it up??

trying to get the rod to some 800 centigrade. Any idea if this would work???

Wow, what with the 2800W generator last week and now this, my life is complete.

cells;2981100

can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to … can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to sound ridiculous but bear with me....I assume this works by zapping a large current (160 amps by the looks of it) at the point you want to weld which heats the point up to a temperature metals melts at.What would happen if I had a good connection of this on both sizes of a large graphite rod (so no spark, just the current running though the rod). Would the current pass through the rod and hence heat it up??trying to get the rod to some 800 centigrade. Any idea if this would work???



I haven't a clue but what is the resistance of the rod?

Remember that these work with a duty cycle. That is the more power you use the less time you can use it before cooling it down. At the highest settings this can be around 20% is use time. Again this is a difference between cheaper & professsional equipment. As amateurs normally do a short weld & have a long think & preparation before the next weld this doesn't matter much for welding - but low voltage high amps heating of graphite rods who knows!

Chris52;2981618

I haven't a clue but what is the resistance of the rod?Remember that … I haven't a clue but what is the resistance of the rod?Remember that these work with a duty cycle. That is the more power you use the less time you can use it before cooling it down. At the highest settings this can be around 20% is use time. Again this is a difference between cheaper & professsional equipment. As amateurs normally do a short weld & have a long think & preparation before the next weld this doesn't matter much for welding - but low voltage high amps heating of graphite rods who knows!





It is about 0.05 ohms.
So I should be able to get about 1000 watts in there according to
power = current squared x resistance.

I think it should work but im not sure. Might be worth buying one to test as they are quite cheap.

edit
i didn't know about the duty cycle. If this can output 1000 watts of energy it would take 2 hours to heat the rod up so I guess its not suitable.

Anyone who uses electric welders know if you can get high power (3000 watts, perhaps more??) ones that can be left on near continuously.

cells;2981100

can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to … can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to sound ridiculous but bear with me....I assume this works by zapping a large current (160 amps by the looks of it) at the point you want to weld which heats the point up to a temperature metals melts at.What would happen if I had a good connection of this on both sizes of a large graphite rod (so no spark, just the current running though the rod). Would the current pass through the rod and hence heat it up??trying to get the rod to some 800 centigrade. Any idea if this would work???



Try doing a search for carbon arc torch attachment. I find it a really useful addition to my arc welder, less flexible than oxy acetylene but cheaper than bottle rent and refill for the number of occasions that I need it.

I have a vague idea that you use to be able to buy a brazing attachment for arc welders that used graphite rods with an arc between them to heat a separate filler brazing rod - it was called carbon arc brazing. How hot the carbon rods got at about the 50 amps used I have no idea.

Why do you want to heat a graphite rod to 800C?

I have just had a search & these two links might be of interest:

mig-welding.co.uk/for…839
freepatentsonline.com/423…tml

Chris52;2981963

I have a vague idea that you use to be able to buy a brazing attachment … I have a vague idea that you use to be able to buy a brazing attachment for arc welders that used graphite rods with an arc between them to heat a separate filler brazing rod - it was called carbon arc brazing. How hot the carbon rods got at about the 50 amps used I have no idea.Why do you want to heat a graphite rod to 800C?I have just had a search & these two links might be of interest:http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=3839http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4237365.html





We use it in a manufacturing process with molten metal. If we don't heat it up first it shatters.

Currently we use propane to heat it up but it is a very expensive way of doing it. Costs some £3k per week in propane!!

looking for a more efficient way to do it. There are some electric ovens which reach the 800-1000 degrees id need but they are expensive, heavy and slow.

I figure if I could pass a large current through the thing it would heat up nicely. Just need a cheap-ish way to do it in a safe manor.
So was looking for devises which pump high current and this seems too.

Ill probably buy this as its dirt cheap and see if it works at all. If it can increase the temp to 100 centigrade ill invest in a better one if this one cant get it closer to 800-1000

I can see why saving any part of £3k per week is interesting. Good luck.

is this really safe in the house? as part of our course we had a go at arc welding (industrial) and it is absolutely mental.

if you do get ones of these make sure you take all safety precautions, there is a fair few volts and amps that these can kick out!!

Original Poster

A MIG welder would be lovely in terms of flexibility, neatness and ease of use (point-and-click affair), but I've always been bothered by gas bottle rental. Arc welding is almost an art-form in terms of skill but is lots cheaper.

What I liked about this set was inclusive rods and a facemask which some sets don't come with. And yep, the duty cycle isn't fantastic and at near full whack you'll only be welding for 20% of the time. More of an occasional welder.

Something I could do with an answer to, you put your own 13A plug on and it says that's fine for below 70A, but if you go for prolonged periods over 70A, you should wire in a 240V industrial plug. Does this mean I need to install a new socket? I've only ever welded at work.

You can always tell the quality pieces of kit as they always have 'Turbo', 'Power', 'Extreme' before the name lol

xfirebladex;2983786

A MIG welder would be lovely in terms of flexibility, neatness and ease … A MIG welder would be lovely in terms of flexibility, neatness and ease of use (point-and-click affair), but I've always been bothered by gas bottle rental. Arc welding is almost an art-form in terms of skill but is lots cheaper..




Agreed but I just pointed it out for non experts. The disposable Argon/CO2 bottles work out expensive but it really all depends on what/ how much you intend to weld

xfirebladex;2983786

Something I could do with an answer to, you put your own 13A plug on and … Something I could do with an answer to, you put your own 13A plug on and it says that's fine for below 70A, but if you go for prolonged periods over 70A, you should wire in a 240V industrial plug. Does this mean I need to install a new socket? I've only ever welded at work.



I think, but don't know, that this is to do with the standard plug & socket which are simply not designed for sustained 13 amp use & eventually arc, burn & die. The industrial ones don't have these problems. Be careful about fusing as the 13a industrial sockets/ plugs that I have seen are not fused but there may well be types that are. I would also suggest that a welder of this size is right at the limit of a 13A fuse and would be more comfortable on a higher amperage circuit - like a cooker - but this is no longer a DIY job.

cells;2981100

can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to … can I use one of these to heat up a graphite rod?? This is going to sound ridiculous but bear with me....trying to get the rod to some 800 centigrade. Any idea if this would work???



Yes it will work

These are now £29.99 at the Great Yarmouth branch. The apron & gloves kit & the magnetic corner/hammer kit are both £6.99. This is a very cheap welding kit!

Chris

just got welder from aldi what type of plug do i need for this item
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