£20 coin with free delivery £20 @ Royal Mint
-59°Expired

£20 coin with free delivery £20 @ Royal Mint

Banned 21
Banned
Found 26th Sep 2014
We are proud to issue only the second UK £20 coin in history, struck for a most important anniversary – the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. With a specially-commissioned design of Britannia watching over departing troops.

Only the UK's second £20 coin – the first sold out!An official United Kingdom coin, dated 2014Over 100,000 already sold!FREE UK P &P* - Enter E1531B in promotional code box

Shared Via The HUKD App For Android.

21 Comments

Original Poster Banned

I bought 3 about 3 weeks ago. just waiting for the right time to sell.

leelee6781

I bought 3 about 3 weeks ago. just waiting for the right time to sell.



Going to be a long wait to make money on any of these things

Original Poster Banned

eslick

Going to be a long wait to make money on any of these things


I can make 50% profit now, I don't want 1000s or millions but as Tesco says 'Every little helps'

4% Quidco don't forget !!

50% profit?? How?

A £20 coin is worth how much? £20! Its coin of the realm after all.

nd4spd

4% Quidco don't forget !!



Or maybe not...

Terms & conditions

•Please note, the Royal Mint is legally unable to provide cashback on coins who’s selling price is the same as it’s denomination, e.g. £5 coin sold for £5 or 50p coin sold for 50p.

leelee6781

I can make 50% profit now, I don't want 1000s or millions but as Tesco … I can make 50% profit now, I don't want 1000s or millions but as Tesco says 'Every little helps'



How can you make £10 if someone can buy them for this price?

I'm also lost as to how this is a deal...

Original Poster Banned

shipping to collectors abroad. I know someone in Malta who wants the 3 I've bought and he's also shown interest in the 7 £5 coins I have.

Original Poster Banned

I sold a coin last year to a collector in Malaysia. I got it free as a gift for being a long serving customer to Royal Mint and I sold it for £55

Voted hot. It is a legal tender so would always get back what you put in.


Apparently... for collectors personal use... and therefore they are not redeemable for the face value...
you can't spend them or change at a bank

If YOU get pleasure from these things go right ahead and get them. Anybody else is just removing useful currency from the system and tying it up in a trinket, the opposite of quantitative easing.

leelee6781

I sold a coin last year to a collector in Malaysia. I got it free as a … I sold a coin last year to a collector in Malaysia. I got it free as a gift for being a long serving customer to Royal Mint and I sold it for £55



Im off to Thailand, Hong Kong and Malaysia in January.

Will I find these good paying Jonny Foreigners wondering around the streets for me to sell them to?

Original Poster Banned

cburns

Apparently... for collectors personal use... and therefore they are not … Apparently... for collectors personal use... and therefore they are not redeemable for the face value...you can't spend them or change at a bank


you can spend them. its legal tender

CHEEPSTUFFRULES!

If YOU get pleasure from these things go right ahead and get them. … If YOU get pleasure from these things go right ahead and get them. Anybody else is just removing useful currency from the system and tying it up in a trinket, the opposite of quantitative easing.


....Because these 'collector' coins are obviously made for the 'system'.....

Original Poster Banned

P13ULC

Im off to Thailand, Hong Kong and Malaysia in January.Will I find these … Im off to Thailand, Hong Kong and Malaysia in January.Will I find these good paying Jonny Foreigners wondering around the streets for me to sell them to?


lol.. not sure. try and find a buyer/collector before you go.

Original Poster Banned

Are £20 coins legal tender?
Posted on April 9, 2014 by Dan Oliver
Since its introduction in 2013 there has been some confusion as to whether or not the UK’s first ever £20 coin is actually legal tender, leading to questions very much like those raised about the £5 coin when that was first introduced in 1990.

£20 coin

The simple answer is: “Yes, it is!”. However, we thought we would give you a bit more detail than that.


Legal tender has a very specific meaning, in that it defines what can be used as a means to settle debts. If a debtor attempts to pay in court using ‘legal tender’ they cannot successfully be sued for non-payment.

UK coins are regulated by the Coinage Act of 1971. Among many other things, the Act defines the legal tender status of coins as:

Coins of cupro-nickel, silver or bronze shall be legal tender as follows —

(a) coins of cupro-nickel or silver of denominations of more than 10 pence, for payment of any amount not exceeding £10;

(b) coins of cupro-nickel or silver of denominations of not more than 10 pence, for payment of any amount not exceeding £5;

(c) coins of bronze, for payment of any amount not exceeding 20 pence.

So, for example, under the rules of legal tender shops are not required to accept more than 20 pence in 1p or 2p coins – although most will. You can read more on what is and isn’t acceptable under the legal definition of legal tender on our website.

As you can see, there is no mention of the £20 or £5 coin and that is because the Act dates to 1971, when neither coin had been introduced.

So, in order for the £20 coin, and other new coin denominations, to be legal tender the Queen, on the advice of her Privy Council, issued a Royal Proclamation under the Act.

(1B) Other coins, if made current by a proclamation under section 3 of this Act, shall be legal tender in accordance with the provision made by that proclamation or by any later proclamation made under that section.

Thanks to the proclamation the £20 coin, like the £5 coin, and all other United Kingdom coins of the realm, IS legal tender.

However, while it is indeed legal tender, it has not been designed to be used as a circulating coin. This means that while you would be OK to use it in the settlement of a debt in court, for instance, your local shop or bank probably won’t accept it in trade for goods, as the mechanics and systems are not in place to enable that. The highest denomination coin in general circulation today remains the £2 coin, first introduced in 1998.

The £20 coin has been created with the intention of being a commemorative coin, produced in limited editions and sold at face value (£20) to be bought and kept by collectors or someone looking for an affordable, sterling silver memory of a key personal event or occasion.

And this first issue is proving to be hugely popular in that respect, as we are fast approaching sell out with less than 2,000 left as we go to press with this blog post!

So, is it legal tender? Yes.

- See more at: blog.royalmint.com/are…er/

leelee6781

Are £20 coins legal tender?Posted on April 9, 2014 by Dan OliverSince its … Are £20 coins legal tender?Posted on April 9, 2014 by Dan OliverSince its introduction in 2013 there has been some confusion as to whether or not the UK’s first ever £20 coin is actually legal tender, leading to questions very much like those raised about the £5 coin when that was first introduced in 1990.£20 coinThe simple answer is: “Yes, it is!”. However, we thought we would give you a bit more detail than that.Legal tender has a very specific meaning, in that it defines what can be used as a means to settle debts. If a debtor attempts to pay in court using ‘legal tender’ they cannot successfully be sued for non-payment.UK coins are regulated by the Coinage Act of 1971. Among many other things, the Act defines the legal tender status of coins as:Coins of cupro-nickel, silver or bronze shall be legal tender as follows —(a) coins of cupro-nickel or silver of denominations of more than 10 pence, for payment of any amount not exceeding £10;(b) coins of cupro-nickel or silver of denominations of not more than 10 pence, for payment of any amount not exceeding £5;(c) coins of bronze, for payment of any amount not exceeding 20 pence.So, for example, under the rules of legal tender shops are not required to accept more than 20 pence in 1p or 2p coins – although most will. You can read more on what is and isn’t acceptable under the legal definition of legal tender on our website.As you can see, there is no mention of the £20 or £5 coin and that is because the Act dates to 1971, when neither coin had been introduced.So, in order for the £20 coin, and other new coin denominations, to be legal tender the Queen, on the advice of her Privy Council, issued a Royal Proclamation under the Act.(1B) Other coins, if made current by a proclamation under section 3 of this Act, shall be legal tender in accordance with the provision made by that proclamation or by any later proclamation made under that section.Thanks to the proclamation the £20 coin, like the £5 coin, and all other United Kingdom coins of the realm, IS legal tender.However, while it is indeed legal tender, it has not been designed to be used as a circulating coin. This means that while you would be OK to use it in the settlement of a debt in court, for instance, your local shop or bank probably won’t accept it in trade for goods, as the mechanics and systems are not in place to enable that. The highest denomination coin in general circulation today remains the £2 coin, first introduced in 1998.The £20 coin has been created with the intention of being a commemorative coin, produced in limited editions and sold at face value (£20) to be bought and kept by collectors or someone looking for an affordable, sterling silver memory of a key personal event or occasion.And this first issue is proving to be hugely popular in that respect, as we are fast approaching sell out with less than 2,000 left as we go to press with this blog post!So, is it legal tender? Yes.- See more at: http://blog.royalmint.com/are-20-pound-coins-legal-tender/#sthash.myaR1pjs.dpuf


Cut a long story short, NO! Unless you're in court and want to be a smartarse.

mod

Can I remind people that you can only trade via the FS section of HUKD and not within Deals (I've deleted a number of comments) threads. Also, from FS guidelines:-

Prohibited Trades. The following items must not be listed.*Currency / … Prohibited Trades. The following items must not be listed.*Currency / money exchange

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