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20 Masterpieces of Fantasy Fiction Vol. 1 Kindle Edition - Free @ Amazon
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20 Masterpieces of Fantasy Fiction Vol. 1 Kindle Edition - Free @ Amazon

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Posted 20th Apr

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This volume contains the following 20 works, arranged alphabetically by authors’ last names:

Anonymous: “Beowulf”
Anonymous: “The Epic of Gilgamesh”
Barrie, J. M.: “Peter Pan”
Baum, L. Frank: “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”
Bulgakov, Mikhail: “The Master and Margarita”
Burroughs, Edgar Rice: “A Princess of Mars”
Burroughs, Edgar Rice: “Tarzan of the Apes”
Carroll, Lewis: “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”
Carroll, Lewis: “Through the Looking Glass”
Chesterton, G. K.: “The Man Who Was Thursday”
Dickens, Charles: “A Christmas Carol”
Dunsany, Lord: “The King of Elfland’s Daughter”
Eddison, E. R.: “The Worm Ouroboros”
Howard, Robert E.: “The Hour of the Dragon”
Howard, Robert E.: “Solomon Kane”
MacDonald, George: “Phantastes”
MacDonald, George: “The Princess and the Goblin”
Malory, Thomas: “King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table”
Ruskin, John: “The King of the Golden River”
Twain, Mark: “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court”

Product details

Format: Kindle Edition
File Size: 4654 KB
Print Length: 2240 pages
Publisher: Kathartika (13 April 2020)
Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
Language: English
ASIN: B07QJZL97H
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray:
Not Enabled
Word Wise: Enabled
Screen Reader: Supported
Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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8 Comments
Thanks (again) Boz
Thanks Boz..
Classic stories worth reading yet every one written by a white man. Disappointing how editors make such lazy choices.
Poly_Tribe21/04/2020 11:03

Classic stories worth reading yet every one written by a white man. …Classic stories worth reading yet every one written by a white man. Disappointing how editors make such lazy choices.


Must admit I read stories for what they are. Matters such as the colour of a person's skin does not influence my choice at all. I like Soul Reggae Jazz Classical music Rock Prog music as well from all countries and colours of performers. I apply one decider either the music is good and interesting or not. Same goes with books and authors
Edited by: "Boz" 22nd Apr
Boz22/04/2020 07:32

Must admit I read stories for what they are. Matters such as the colour of …Must admit I read stories for what they are. Matters such as the colour of a person's skin does not influence my choice at all. I like Soul Reggae Jazz Classical music Rock Prog music as well from all countries and colours of performers. I apply one decider either the music is good and interesting or not. Same goes with books and authors


Surely it's just a list of masterpieces. Personally, I would only want to be included in such a list if I merited being there - not because of affirmative action.

I'm black btw, before anyone starts dusting off their high horse!
CalvinSMJ22/04/2020 08:42

Surely it's just a list of masterpieces. Personally, I would only want to …Surely it's just a list of masterpieces. Personally, I would only want to be included in such a list if I merited being there - not because of affirmative action.I'm black btw, before anyone starts dusting off their high horse!


No affirmative action is remotely necessary. There is a great abundance of truly superb, often award-winning, literature written by women and non-white authors. Their exclusion from such an anthology is very problematic. It codifies the idea that only white, male authors can write a ‘masterpiece’ and it harms multiple white and non-white audiences for whom representation truly matters.

Here’s a TV example: As a child, Whoopi Goldberg said to her mother, ‘Momma! There’s a black lady on television and she ain’t no maid!’ She had discovered Nichelle Nichols in original Trek playing Uhura: a competent African-American woman, fourth in command on an impressive, 23rd century spaceship.

Whoopi became an actor playing strong female characters because Nichelle had showed her she *could*. Nichelle herself was convinced by Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. to stay on the show because of the tremendous cultural impact her character had. Such so that Nichelle later helped NASA recruit women and minorities as real, space-going astronauts.

/teacher mode off

npr.org/201…ter?
Price gone up to 99p
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