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26000mah Monster Power Bank £18.99 Delivered @ MyMemory
26000mah Monster Power Bank £18.99 Delivered @ MyMemory

26000mah Monster Power Bank £18.99 Delivered @ MyMemory

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With a large capacity of 26,000mAh, the Monster Power Bank can charge multiple mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets to keep them running when you are out living life, without worrying whether you will have enough power to talk, snap and play. It is ideal for home use, road trips, long flights and outdoor activities.

The Monster 26,000 mAh Power Bank can automatically detect the input 
current demand of different devices and their specific charging needs 
for improved compatibility. 

With 3 USB slots it is powerful enough to charge multiple devices at the 
same time. From mobile phones, tablets, mp3 players, and other devices 
that use USB charging.

Key Features

- High capacity of 26,000mAh 

- 3 USB output sockets 

- Multiple safety protection system to ensure that devices are charged 
safely 

- Smart LEDs display remaining power 

- Output power: 2 x 1A USB ports and 1 x 2.4A USB port

Specification

Height: 215mm 

Width: 81mm 

Length: 23mm 

Weight: 570g 

Approx. Charge times 

- iPhone 5s: up to 11 times 

- iPhone 6: up to 10 times 

- iPhone 6 Plus: up to 6 times 

- Galaxy S6: up to 7 times 

- Galaxy Note 4: up to 6 times

21 Comments

This will almost certainly not be 26000 mAh.

qwerta369

This will almost certainly not be 26000 mAh.


Based on?

stuellis

Based on?



Common sense and the fact that all these random non-brand powerbanks lie.

ollie87

Common sense and the fact that all these random non-brand powerbanks lie.


What common sense? The cells that go into these can come in this capacity and the only way to test the capacity is to take the cell out of the unit and test it which the majority of reviewers don't do. I'm not saying it isn't false advertising but Ive had 2 brilliant 22,400mha packs for about £14 each.
Edited by: "stuellis" 9th Dec 2016

qwerta369

This will almost certainly not be 26000 mAh.


I'm with you on that one aswell.

stuellis

What common sense? The cells that go into these can come in this capacity … What common sense? The cells that go into these can come in this capacity and the only way to test the capacity is to take the cell out of the unit and test it which the majority of reviewers don't do. I'm not saying it isn't false advertising but Ive had 2 brilliant 22,400mha packs for about £14 each.



You can test it without taking it apart.

stuellis

Based on?


I bought a ravpower 15000mah from amazon and questioned the capacity the reply follows:
Dear customer,

We understand your concern. Please allow me to explain this issue. Hope it can clarify.
The voltage of a power bank is 3.7v. And to charge a portable device, its output voltage should rise to 5v. As there is a process of boosting the voltage from 3.7v to 5v, some battery juice will lose when charging a device

The average conversion rate of a power bank in the market is around 80%, we can use a formula to calculate the actual output = nominal capacity*3.7v/5v*80%. As the conversion rate of our power bank can reach 86%. We can get the result that the actual output of 15000mAh is 9546mAh.

The one without iSmart logo is the older version. But please rest assured that the performance is the same. Sunvalleytek is our exclusive distributor so all the RAVPower products sold by Sunvalleytek is genuine.

Any additional questions, please do feel free to let us know.
Thank you for your continued support.
Sincerely,

Livia

stuellis

Based on?



stuellis

Common sense and the fact that all these random non-brand powerbanks lie.

What common sense? The cells that go into these can come in this capacity and the only way to test the capacity is to take the cell out of the unit and test it which the majority of reviewers don't do. I'm not saying it isn't false advertising but Ive had 2 brilliant 22,400mha packs for about £14 each.
I purchased a ravpower from amazon and questioned the capacity the reply follows:
Dear customer,

We understand your concern. Please allow me to explain this issue. Hope it can clarify.
The voltage of a power bank is 3.7v. And to charge a portable device, its output voltage should rise to 5v. As there is a process of boosting the voltage from 3.7v to 5v, some battery juice will lose when charging a device

The average conversion rate of a power bank in the market is around 80%, we can use a formula to calculate the actual output = nominal capacity*3.7v/5v*80%. As the conversion rate of our power bank can reach 86%. We can get the result that the actual output of 15000mAh is 9546mAh.

The one without iSmart logo is the older version. But please rest assured that the performance is the same. Sunvalleytek is our exclusive distributor so all the RAVPower products sold by Sunvalleytek is genuine.

Any additional questions, please do feel free to let us know.
Thank you for your continued support.
Sincerely,

Livia

DELOS

I bought a ravpower 15000mah from amazon and questioned the capacity the … I bought a ravpower 15000mah from amazon and questioned the capacity the reply follows:Dear customer,We understand your concern. Please allow me to explain this issue. Hope it can clarify.The voltage of a power bank is 3.7v. And to charge a portable device, its output voltage should rise to 5v. As there is a process of boosting the voltage from 3.7v to 5v, some battery juice will lose when charging a deviceThe average conversion rate of a power bank in the market is around 80%, we can use a formula to calculate the actual output = nominal capacity*3.7v/5v*80%. As the conversion rate of our power bank can reach 86%. We can get the result that the actual output of 15000mAh is 9546mAh.The one without iSmart logo is the older version. But please rest assured that the performance is the same. Sunvalleytek is our exclusive distributor so all the RAVPower products sold by Sunvalleytek is genuine.Any additional questions, please do feel free to let us know.Thank you for your continued support.Sincerely,Livia


Clearly a response from someone with either a very basic understanding or being conservative with the truth. Not all power banks use 3.7v, it is more common to use a 3.7v Li-ion cell but some do use 4.2v Li-po. Li-ion are safer but have a lower power density. The efficiency of the voltage conversion will vary a lot between brands and 86% seems very optimistic. The efficiency also varies depending on the discharge current used. You also will never get the full capacity of the cell either due to the protection built into the power bank, the charging circuit will stop the cell charging before 100% is reached to increase the life of the cell and reduce fire risk. You also will never discharge a cell 100% in the device, it will shutoff before to again protect the cell. The only accurate way to measure the cell is to take it out of the device.

michaeldutton902

£0.99 on … £0.99 on ebayhttp://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Monster-Power-Bank-26-000mAh-with-3-USB-Charging-Ports-For-Tablets-Mobile-Phones/282280533613



Have you seen the seller? Seems legit.

stuellis

Clearly a response from someone with either a very basic understanding or … Clearly a response from someone with either a very basic understanding or being conservative with the truth. Not all power banks use 3.7v, it is more common to use a 3.7v Li-ion cell but some do use 4.2v Li-po. Li-ion are safer but have a lower power density. The efficiency of the voltage conversion will vary a lot between brands and 86% seems very optimistic. The efficiency also varies depending on the discharge current used. You also will never get the full capacity of the cell either due to the protection built into the power bank, the charging circuit will stop the cell charging before 100% is reached to increase the life of the cell and reduce fire risk. You also will never discharge a cell 100% in the device, it will shutoff before to again protect the cell. The only accurate way to measure the cell is to take it out of the device.


This is a copy of the email sent to me from Ravpower to explain the power output drop

DELOS

This is a copy of the email sent to me from Ravpower to explain the … This is a copy of the email sent to me from Ravpower to explain the power output drop



And its overly simplified to the point of being useless

stuellis

And its overly simplified to the point of being useless


They are telling me (the people who make the pack) that a 15000 mah is actual about 9500 mah
Edited by: "DELOS" 11th Dec 2016

DELOS

They are telling me (the people who make the pack) that a 15000 mah is … They are telling me (the people who make the pack) that a 15000 mah is actual about 9500 mah


No they aren't, that's not what they mean at all. They are saying it can put out 5v @ 9500mha but the cell is 15000mha @ 3.7v. Its not that simple and that's part of my point, if a 15000mha the 9500mha will be an over estimation as you cant fully discharge or full charge it without reducing its life.

15000x3.7v = 55.5Wh
But the unit has to convert 3.7v to 5v and this process they claim is 86% efficient.
So (55.5Wh/5.0v)*86% = the theoretical 9500mha

A contributing factor is people use mha when they should use Wh

This all goes back to my original point. The only way to accurately measure the cells mha is to take it out the power bank and test it. In the power bank there are too many variables.


Edited by: "stuellis" 11th Dec 2016

I know nothing about these, but when you guys are arguing about realistic capacity and charging efficiency etc, does this only apply to certain capacities or brands or is it most/all power banks? I was thinking about ordering a 10000 anker with quick charge 3.0 for £20 before I seen this one but now I don't know what to do.

I have a white genuine Xiaomi 20000 mAh powerbank. She charges my iPhone 6S plus very quickly, averaging around 5-6 0-100% charges before dying. Build quality is great. She is supreme. I love her. I bought her in Singapore.

stuellis

Clearly a response from someone with either a very basic understanding or … Clearly a response from someone with either a very basic understanding or being conservative with the truth. Not all power banks use 3.7v, it is more common to use a 3.7v Li-ion cell but some do use 4.2v Li-po. Li-ion are safer but have a lower power density. The efficiency of the voltage conversion will vary a lot between brands and 86% seems very optimistic. The efficiency also varies depending on the discharge current used. You also will never get the full capacity of the cell either due to the protection built into the power bank, the charging circuit will stop the cell charging before 100% is reached to increase the life of the cell and reduce fire risk. You also will never discharge a cell 100% in the device, it will shutoff before to again protect the cell. The only accurate way to measure the cell is to take it out of the device.



​that is the problem, free people understand batteries.

LiPo cells have a nominal voltage of 3.7v and a MAXIMUM CHARGE voltage of 4.2 V and a fully discharged voltage of 3.0v

Li Ion have a nominal voltage of 3.6v but then you can have cobalt and phosphate based versions that are slightly higher voltage with nominal volts up to 3.85.

hope this helps.

with relation to this battery I'd pretty much bet my life that if you do get the stated capacity, you won't after a few weeks.

*edit obviously "free" should have been "few" damn autocorrect.

also, this is the size of a brick !!

Original Poster

hence why its 26000mah..., it obviously has more cells inside would be my guess
Edited by: "shootomanUK" 26th Dec 2016
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