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30 AA Sony Alkaline Batteries for £1.24 @ Sainsburys
30 AA Sony Alkaline Batteries for £1.24 @ Sainsburys

30 AA Sony Alkaline Batteries for £1.24 @ Sainsburys

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Poped into my local sainsburys in Kenton and saw the batteries at the tills. There was no price label but it scanned at £1.24. Looks like a good deal for 30 batteries. Not sure whether its nation wide, worth checking. My first Post btw.

80 Comments

30 branded alkaline batteries for £1.24 is an awesome price! Doubt its in all stores though, probably clearing old stock, but well worth buying if you can find it

30 little landfill bullets.

Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.

COLD

Banned

great deal!

ibiza;4741975

30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste … 30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.COLD



Do you cut and paste this on all battery deals?

ibiza;4741975

30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste … 30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.COLD



I think i know the reason, its because you cant get them lolz, at times i feel like same but voting cold is not fair with op, because it is a good deal

ibiza;4741975

30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste … 30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.COLD



Shouldn't deals be impartially judged on the price of that particular deal?

HOT from me

Why is it a good deal when rechargeables are equivalent to less than 1p a battery, zayf? :?

ibiza;4741975

30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste … 30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.COLD



Doesn't really work in a case like this. The batteries are clearly a clearance of old stock - no company can afford to make and distribute alkaline cells for 4p each - so the resources are already used, the space they will ultimately take up in landfill going to be used regardless who purchases (or doesn't purchase) them. And at 4p each rechargables probably are not cheaper in the long run (similar capacities overall, very few people will have a set of rechargeables and make them last the '1000' charges they are supposed to, if you can get the total-cost-of-ownership of a single AA rechargeable cell (including cost of charger and electricity) below 4p you are doing very well!

pibpob;4742127

Why is it a good deal when rechargeables are equivalent to less than 1p a … Why is it a good deal when rechargeables are equivalent to less than 1p a battery, zayf? :?



But they are not - far from it!

ibiza;4741975

Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't … Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.


That depends on the use. For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the wireless keyboard, rechargeable batteries do not work very well. But for frequent and high power use (such as digital cameras), rechargeable batteries rock. And if you find a good deal, they hardly cost any more.

MANJ_007;4742055

Do you cut and paste this on all battery deals?



I put it on most I see, but obviously not cut and pasted.

Cheap non rechargeable batteries are both a false economy - and an easily avoidable source of pollutant waste.

There are a few occasions where non reachargeables would be needed - but its not likely to be this type of cheap stuff that would fulfill that remit.

If the government had any commitment to its alleged green policies - it would be placing a tax on these that should be returned as a reduction on rechargeables. Or alternately getting the power companies they encouraged to subsidise low energy bulbs to start offering the same subsidies to rechargeable kit.

There really is no justification for buying this type of product - when for every single rechargeable AA battery that ends up as waste - the equivalent of non rechargeables takes up about the space of a shoe box.

Can you suggest any reason to buy these, when you look at the wider picture?

Put a bag on the back of your cupboard, and whenever their exhausted pop them in there. What is really needed is an annual/bi-annual national collection day - sometime in January / February (and advertised in December, so that Batteries are then collected from the doorstep.

Homebase and a few other stores do now offer Battery Disposal. I'm just hoping these aren't put in a container ship and shipped off to a third world country for 'recycling'. Which seems to happen with so much of our recycled material from Councils - an easy cop-out for them.

Rechargable can be just as dangerous, especially now labelling of these has become much more like disposable - so you can end up throwing these out by mistake. Don't put them in the rubbish - especially NiCad - Cadmium is very dangerous when it gets into water supplies - so don't put them down the toilet either.

ibiza;4742214

I put it on most I see, but obviously not cut and pasted.Cheap non … I put it on most I see, but obviously not cut and pasted.Cheap non rechargeable batteries are both a false economy - and an easily avoidable source of pollutant waste.There are a few occasions where non reachargeables would be needed - but its not likely to be this type of cheap stuff that would fulfill that remit.If the government had any commitment to its alleged green policies - it would be placing a tax on these that should be returned as a reduction on rechargeables. Or alternately getting the power companies they encouraged to subsidise low energy bulbs to start offering the same subsidies to rechargeable kit.There really is no justification for buying this type of product - when for every single rechargeable AA battery that ends up as waste - the equivalent of non rechargeables takes up about the space of a shoe box.[COLOR="Red"]Can you suggest any reason to buy these, when you look at the wider picture[/COLOR]?



Yup, they are cheap! Will do for me.

ibiza;4742214

I put it on most I see, but obviously not cut and pasted.Cheap non … I put it on most I see, but obviously not cut and pasted.Cheap non rechargeable batteries are both a false economy - and an easily avoidable source of pollutant waste.There are a few occasions where non reachargeables would be needed - but its not likely to be this type of cheap stuff that would fulfill that remit.If the government had any commitment to its alleged green policies - it would be placing a tax on these that should be returned as a reduction on rechargeables. Or alternately getting the power companies they encouraged to subsidise low energy bulbs to start offering the same subsidies to rechargeable kit.There really is no justification for buying this type of product - when for every single rechargeable AA battery that ends up as waste - the equivalent of non rechargeables takes up about the space of a shoe box.Can you suggest any reason to buy these, when you look at the wider picture?



But you are factually wrong in this case. These are not 'cheap stuff' batteries. The batteries you find down a market or in poundland at 12 or 24 for a £1 are zinc carbon, cheaply mass manufactured in China with poor quality control. These are not that at all - they are branded alkaline cells, the same as Duracell or Energizer - which given their price will be old stock that Sainsburys want to clear out.

New alkaline cells are typically at very least 20p each, even when bought in bulk quantities - and often much more. They have shelf lives of 7 years+ - these cells are probably going to be a couple of years old but will still hold most of their original capacity which will be 2AH+, similar to only the high-price Ni-Mh rechargeable cells.

Tommy2;4742162

That depends on the use. For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the … That depends on the use. For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the wireless keyboard, rechargeable batteries do not work very well. But for frequent and high power use (such as digital cameras), rechargeable batteries rock. And if you find a good deal, they hardly cost any more.



all depends on the type of rechargable!

Tommy2;4742162

That depends on the use. For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the … That depends on the use. For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the wireless keyboard, rechargeable batteries do not work very well. But for frequent and high power use (such as digital cameras), rechargeable batteries rock. And if you find a good deal, they hardly cost any more.



For that type of use - you can use Hybrio or Eneloop type batteries - which have a slightly lower capacity, but lose almost no charge over time.

I have two Hybrio AAs in the keyboard I am typing on now - and they have been in since Autumn - with the PC being used often. They also work well in clocks, and in the lights on one bike I seldom use.

Additionally - if you also keep a charger in your cars, then you tend to have an extra charged set of batteries with you even if the car stops running with a flat battery.

This is also useful to use with a USB battery extender, so if my phone is going flat, I can recharge it in my pocket from the 4 x AAs in the battery extender.

So I disaagree with your view on the usage of rechchargeables in the long slow drain respect.

tightar5e;4742225

Put a bag on the back of your cupboard, and whenever their exhausted pop … Put a bag on the back of your cupboard, and whenever their exhausted pop them in there.

But disposal is only part of the story - there is still a huge amount of energy and raw materials required to make these things.

Tommy2;4742162

For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the wireless keyboard, … For the emergency torch, the bath radio or the wireless keyboard, rechargeable batteries do not work very well.

But you can bet that the people going for these bulk deals are not going to use all the batteries in these applications - they'd reach the end of their shelf life before they were used.

Got these 2 weeks or so ago from the Newcastle Under Lyme store.

Voted hot (cos its hot) to counteract the hypocrytical environmentalist hijackers. :thumbsup:
HKUD is a place to find deals not air personal views

It's a good deal - that's what this site is all about.
If you want to preach about environmentalism them go to 'greennutters.com' or something.

Rechargeables are 1.2v, alkaline 1.5v. Sometimes it matters. Personally I've not found rechargeables very satisfactory in many appliances and I suspect the latest 'hi tech' rechargeables have even nastier things in them when disposal time arrives.

Don't just bin them. Our council tip has a box for them or, as someone said, so do some stores. How hard can that be once or twice a year? I think I can be reasonably green and responsible without compromising lifestyle or having to preach to everyone else.

You can be a responsible citizen without having to get on your high horse.

ibiza;4741975

30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste … 30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.COLD



Just to bring you back to your first post, this deal is for normal batteries, not rechargeables. Vote on the deal not an alternative, in this case its a hot deal because its cheap good quality batteries.

If your gonna cast a cold vote then post a different deal thats better, otherwise dont vote at all

Besford;4742503

Rechargeables are 1.2v, alkaline 1,5v. Sometimes it matters.



Thats not strictly accurate (alkaline cells pretty rapidly drop to 1.2V and below, where as Ni-Mhs stay close to 1.2v throughout their discharge) - but regardless I really don't see how most the arguments in this thread are relevant in this particular case....

These are not 'new' batteries (as in batteries bought in by Sainsburys to sell at £1.24 for 30) - they are almost certainly a clearance stock - being sold cheap. Buying a pack of these doesn't mean Sainsburys will then buy another 30 pack to replace them (as they won't be able to purchase at anything close to that price!). So I don't really see how the environment issue is that relevant.

And those saying rechargables are cheaper are also in general wrong - I'm confident the vast majority of people who have used rechargable batteries have had many sets which for various reasons haven't lasted 50 charges yet alone five hundred or a thousand. Add the cost of the charger(s), and the not insignificant cost to recharge the cells, and I'd be very surprised if the total cost of ownership works out below 4p per-cell per-charge!

pibpob;4742319

But disposal is only part of the story - there is still a huge amount of … But disposal is only part of the story - there is still a huge amount of energy and raw materials required to make these things.


And your answer is???????????????

There's a world shortage of caves now the Taliban have bought them all up so I'm afraid I'm going to have to continue my dreadfully irresponsible western lifestyle.

zayf;4742114

I think i know the reason, its because you cant get them lolz, at times i … I think i know the reason, its because you cant get them lolz, at times i feel like same but voting cold is not fair with op, because it is a good deal




tony5101;4742123

Shouldn't deals be impartially judged on the price of that particular … Shouldn't deals be impartially judged on the price of that particular deal? HOT from me



MANJ_007;4742240

Yup, they are cheap! Will do for me.




You have to look at the social cost too.

A pair of trainers made by kids in a sweat shop might seem a good price - but it creates a victim.

With non rechargeable batteries the victims are our future generations.

If cheap is all that matters, then apparently the most common things stolen by junkies to feed their habit is razor blades and batteries - are they good cheap deals too?

However, rechargeables are obviously cheaper in the long term - its the initial cost of a decent charger - and ignorance that are the only deterents.

So by your own arguements - in favour of a lower price - overall the batteries in this deal WILL COST MORE - even ignoring their unethical side.

So practice what you preach and buy rechargeable ones to save money.



jah128;4742139

Doesn't really work in a case like this. The batteries are clearly a … Doesn't really work in a case like this. The batteries are clearly a clearance of old stock - no company can afford to make and distribute alkaline cells for 4p each - so the resources are already used, the space they will ultimately take up in landfill going to be used regardless who purchases (or doesn't purchase) them. And at 4p each rechargables probably are not cheaper in the long run (similar capacities overall, very few people will have a set of rechargeables and make them last the '1000' charges they are supposed to, if you can get the total-cost-of-ownership of a single AA rechargeable cell (including cost of charger and electricity) below 4p you are doing very well!But they are not - far from it!




I have spent about £60 - £70 quid on batteries and chargers in the last year when I decided I would buy no more primaries - all but the charger in the car are ones that will charge individually - and stop charging when full.

I would guess the heaviest usage is in PMRs which can go through a set in a day and are used very often, and after that my niece and nephews toys. The oldest rechargeables I have are probably about five years old and still are working in toys (ni-cads make toy cars go faster, but not for as long). I would guess the old batteries would be massively under 1p a charge in cost now - with everything totalled up over 5 years (although you need to let them run flat - and let the charger condition them for longevity). Also the PMR ones were 2500mAh I got with 25% off their clearance price when they were about to return the stock from Homebase when they were swapping to selling Energizers - and cost about 57p per battery. I would guess these ones - even only being bought late last summer are under 1p per usage already, even including their share of the costs buying the chargers.


jah128;4742245

But you are factually wrong in this case. These are not 'cheap stuff' … But you are factually wrong in this case. These are not 'cheap stuff' batteries. The batteries you find down a market or in poundland at 12 or 24 for a £1 are zinc carbon, cheaply mass manufactured in China with poor quality control. These are not that at all - they are branded alkaline cells, the same as Duracell or Energizer - which given their price will be old stock that Sainsburys want to clear out.New alkaline cells are typically at very least 20p each, even when bought in bulk quantities - and often much more. They have shelf lives of 7 years+ - these cells are probably going to be a couple of years old but will still hold most of their original capacity which will be 2AH+, similar to only the high-price Ni-Mh rechargeable cells.



I got 800mAh Hybrio AAAs, 2000nAh Hybrio AAs, and 2500mAh AAs for £2.28 per 4 pack in Homebase. Obviously the reachargeables are far cheaper.



tightar5e;4742225

Put a bag on the back of your cupboard, and whenever their exhausted pop … Put a bag on the back of your cupboard, and whenever their exhausted pop them in there. What is really needed is an annual/bi-annual national collection day - sometime in January / February (and advertised in December, so that Batteries are then collected from the doorstep. Homebase and a few other stores do now offer Battery Disposal. I'm just hoping these aren't put in a container ship and shipped off to a third world country for 'recycling'. Which seems to happen with so much of our recycled material from Councils - an easy cop-out for them.Rechargable can be just as dangerous, especially now labelling of these has become much more like disposable - so you can end up throwing these out by mistake. Don't put them in the rubbish - especially NiCad - Cadmium is very dangerous when it gets into water supplies - so don't put them down the toilet either.




Since last year the law changed meaning local councils must have waste battery processing facilities. Your local waste depot will have a facility you can take them too. I use the Shieldhall one in Glasgow, where the container for them is shaped like a massive car battery.

Besford;4742595

And your answer is???????????????

Answer to what? To using disposables? I think that's been made more than clear in this thread!

jah128;4742585

Thats not strictly accurate (alkaline cells pretty rapidly drop to 1.2V … Thats not strictly accurate (alkaline cells pretty rapidly drop to 1.2V and below, where as Ni-Mhs stay close to 1.2v throughout their discharge) - but regardless I really don't see how most the arguments in this thread are relevant in this particular case.... These are not 'new' batteries (as in batteries bought in by Sainsburys to sell at £1.24 for 30) - they are almost certainly a clearance stock - being sold cheap. Buying a pack of these doesn't mean Sainsburys will then buy another 30 pack to replace them (as they won't be able to purchase at anything close to that price!). So I don't really see how the environment issue is that relevant. And those saying rechargables are cheaper are also in general wrong - I'm confident the vast majority of people who have used rechargable batteries have had many sets which for various reasons haven't lasted 50 charges yet alone five hundred or a thousand. Add the cost of the charger(s), and the not insignificant cost to recharge the cells, and I'd be very surprised if the total cost of ownership works out below 4p per-cell per-charge!


I agree with all of that, other than the fact that some devices do not work well with rechargeables - maybe they don't work well at 1.2v and below, hence they'll work (for a while) on alkalines. I've got a box full of branded rechargeables which didn't last long.

Thyseus;4742524

Vote on the deal not an alternative, in this case its a hot deal because … Vote on the deal not an alternative, in this case its a hot deal because its cheap good quality batteries.

How are they "good quality"? Because they are marked with the pumped-up brand "Sony"? I thought most people could see through that...

rechargable idiots... post in rechargables threads everyone 'knows' rechargable work out cheaper but they are not so handy and depends on usage and your requirements.
sky remote: 2 standard rechargables need 'alot' of recharging due to selfdischarge
low selfdischarge need high outlay.
this has about 15 years usage in a sky remote costing 1.24
to save using eneloops which are 3.25 for 2 you'd have to use them for almost 3 times thats ignoring cost to charge them, cost of charger, damaged cells not under 40 year warranty etc.
so yes if you want to make a potential saving of mere pennies to pass on to your grandkids one day far in the future then dont buy these.
if you dont want to buy these for moral reasons then good for you - thats completely irrelevant to the topic which has only one option. HOT.
only reason this couldn't be hot is if you have a link to 30 sony alkalines for cheaper.
if you dont then take your preaching elsewhere

pibpob;4742629

How are they "good quality"? Because they are marked with the pumped-up … How are they "good quality"? Because they are marked with the pumped-up brand "Sony"? I thought most people could see through that...



would you rather go into the pound shop and get 12 for a pound or these as they are branded?

Howdie;4742473

Voted hot (cos its hot) to counteract the hypocrytical environmentalist … Voted hot (cos its hot) to counteract the hypocrytical environmentalist hijackers. :thumbsup:HKUD is a place to find deals not air personal views



OK, totally IGNORE the environmental interests, it is just simple mathematics with money - buy the right rechargeables, and you WILL save a fortune - if you can't see the figures, and God knows, plenty of us have spelled them out on MANY threads on here, then battereis are the least of your problems! :-(

Thyseus;4742524

Just to bring you back to your first post, this deal is for normal … Just to bring you back to your first post, this deal is for normal batteries, not rechargeables. Vote on the deal not an alternative, in this case its a hot deal because its cheap good quality batteries.If your gonna cast a cold vote then post a different deal thats better, otherwise dont vote at all



The deal is for batteries - reachargeables are obviously similar products to primaries, as they do the same job and come in the same sizes.

Buying non reachargeable is a false economy - and is enviromentally unfriendly.

Reagarding posting a good deal for reachargeables - I must have posted well into double figures of deals on batteries and chargers in the past. I have enough now to meet all my needs, so there is no need for me too look for a current deal as that is really the remit of those currently looking to so what I have done already.

However, obviously if I did see a good offer - without actually having to sit here searching for one - then I would post it.

ibiza;4741975

30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste … 30 little landfill bullets.Reachargeables are cheaper long term, waste fewer resources - and don't end up contaminating landfills as much.COLD



partly true, alkalines have their uses....you shouldnt use rechargeable in some devices tho (eg. smoke alarms), they are ready for use, whereas rechargeables arent, even the newer types that supposedly hold the charge for up to a year (like hell do they!)

Howdie;4742473

Voted hot (cos its hot) to counteract the hypocrytical environmentalist … Voted hot (cos its hot) to counteract the hypocrytical environmentalist hijackers. :thumbsup:HKUD is a place to find deals not air personal views



And is that not your personal view?

If you dislike the environmental aspect of posts - read them from the money saving perspective - and you will see that reachargeables are the better bet there too.

jah128;4742245

But you are factually wrong in this case. These are not 'cheap stuff' … But you are factually wrong in this case. These are not 'cheap stuff' batteries. The batteries you find down a market or in poundland at 12 or 24 for a £1 are zinc carbon, cheaply mass manufactured in China with poor quality control. These are not that at all - they are branded alkaline cells, the same as Duracell or Energizer - which given their price will be old stock that Sainsburys want to clear out.New alkaline cells are typically at very least 20p each, even when bought in bulk quantities - and often much more. They have shelf lives of 7 years+ - these cells are probably going to be a couple of years old but will still hold most of their original capacity which will be 2AH+, similar to only the high-price Ni-Mh rechargeable cells.


most batteries are made in china

ibiza;4742318

For that type of use - you can use Hybrio or Eneloop type batteries - … For that type of use - you can use Hybrio or Eneloop type batteries - which have a slightly lower capacity, but lose almost no charge over time.I have two Hybrio AAs in the keyboard I am typing on now - and they have been in since Autumn - with the PC being used often. They also work well in clocks, and in the lights on one bike I seldom use.Additionally - if you also keep a charger in your cars, then you tend to have an extra charged set of batteries with you even if the car stops running with a flat battery.This is also useful to use with a USB battery extender, so if my phone is going flat, I can recharge it in my pocket from the 4 x AAs in the battery extender.So I disaagree with your view on the usage of rechchargeables in the long slow drain respect.


sold by the marketing...had the hybrio types for about 3-4 years when they first came out and had all makes.....they DO NOT last up to a year....nearer a month on full charge

im all for rechargeables - in fact have about 300 as was concerned with amount of landfill and economically rechargebles are far cheaper long term - I pay less than £1 delivered for an AA hybrio rechargeable have done for years...i laughed when people were willingly paying over £5 a battery
rechargeables are only ideal for power hungry devices, not those that require a 'trickle' of power like smoke or co2 alarms
i also have a few landfill batteries for emergencies/devices that dont work well with rechargeables

ibiza;4742610

I have spent about £60 - £70 quid on batteries and chargers in the last y … I have spent about £60 - £70 quid on batteries and chargers in the last year when I decided I would buy no more primaries - all but the charger in the car are ones that will charge individually - and stop charging when full.




ibiza;4742610

I would guess the heaviest usage is in PMRs which can go through a set in … I would guess the heaviest usage is in PMRs which can go through a set in a day and are used very often, and after that my niece and nephews toys. The oldest rechargeables I have are probably about five years old and still are working in toys (ni-cads make toy cars go faster, but not for as long). I would guess the old batteries would be massively under 1p a charge in cost now - with everything totalled up over 5 years (although you need to let them run flat - and let the charger condition them for longevity). Also the PMR ones were 2500mAh I got with 25% off their clearance price when they were about to return the stock from Homebase when they were swapping to selling Energizers - and cost about 57p per battery. I would guess these ones - even only being bought late last summer are under 1p per usage already, even including their share of the costs buying the chargers.



I don't see how your getting those figures of under 1p - and its safe to say you are a very heavy battery user (plus you got some great deals on the eneloops etc). For the vast majority of people cost per ownership will be well above 1p(pcpc). Rechargeables are very useful and in some cases can work out cheaper and arguably more environmentally friendly - but its not always the case (I think it isn't here with batteries such as in the deal...). Regardless of whether or not you use rechargables its always useful to have some spare alkaline cells (even eneloops don't get close to the shelf-life of alkalines) - and for that job, a pack of these is a bargain!

royals;4742706

partly true, alkalines have their uses....you shouldnt use rechargeable … partly true, alkalines have their uses....you shouldnt use rechargeable in some devices tho (eg. smoke alarms), they are ready for use, whereas rechargeables arent, even the newer types that supposedly hold the charge for up to a year (like hell do they!)



Smoke alarms fitted to new builds now have to be mains wired. If you have easy access to the ceiling cavity this makes far more sense. However, as an alarm runs low on power - they "chirp" so you know to recharge the battery.

Additionally - the PP3 9V ones I use - the oldest has probably been in since last easter and was OK when I pressed the test button at the weekend.

MANJ_007;4742240

Yup, they are cheap! Will do for me.


totally illogical and false economy tho as rechargebales will cost £1 delivered each and can be used up to 1000 times (prob less tho), so long rechrgables are much cheaper
30 batteries @£1.24 x 1000 = 30000 uses = £1.24 x 1000 = £1240
30 rechargables = 30000 uses - approx £30-40 including charger, plus electric cost
this assumes 1000 uses
thats one reason why i use rechargaeables as well as landfill (tho im no evironmentalist), just makes logical sense

jah128;4742747

I don't see how your getting those figures of under 1p - and its safe to … I don't see how your getting those figures of under 1p - and its safe to say you are a very heavy battery user (plus you got some great deals on the eneloops etc). For the vast majority of people cost per ownership will be well above 1p(pcpc). Rechargeables are very useful and in some cases can work out cheaper and arguably more environmentally friendly - but its not always the case (I think it isn't here with batteries such as in the deal...). Regardless of whether or not you use rechargables its always useful to have some spare alkaline cells (even eneloops don't get close to the shelf-life of alkalines) - and for that job, a pack of these is a bargain!



Obviously after just switching the price averaged will not be as low, I used the example of the PMRs which have heavy use as a better example of battery usage over time - and having spent roughly 50% of what I spent on batteries on chargers - it would mean a cost per battery including their share of the charger, as about 85p.

I would guess the PMRs batteries will already have had over 100 charges - so currently would be at 0.85p per usage plus the electricity costs which are close to negligible per charge.

Additionally the cost of the older Ni Cads will be well under 1p now given the use they have had.

If a battery is charged on a charger with individual charging circuits - then you dont get the averaging effect such as constantly charging a good battery placed in a charging circuit with a battery that will never take a charge - and so avoiding this type prolongs the batteries lives.

Eneloops/hybrios will not manage a viable multi year charge shelf life. But with any battery you are planning to keep that long without using - you would surely be likely to test them before you use them. So would that not be easier to just swap them for a freshly recharge set instead?

Also - look at my example of my car AA/AAA battery charger. It has a set of AAs left in it all the time - so doing that would also get round a need to carry a pack of spare primaries.

royals;4742878

personally think this is daft, why should they be mains wired.....what … personally think this is daft, why should they be mains wired.....what happens if there is a fire in another part of the house and the wiring is destroyed - then my alarm wont work and i burn to death....sounds tottaly dumb to me - should have a battery back up even if its mains wired



I would largely agree with that - I only discovered it with a flat i renovated last year - and in the building rules discovered the smoke alarms must be hard wired. Although there seems to be nothing against adding extra traditional ones.

After I renovate flats - I rent them out. Fairly often at the end of a let - the battery in the alarm has walked when there would still be life in it. It could be to prevent it working - although as its not uncommon to have a tenant vanish owing rent taking with them anything they liked the look of - then I suspect traditional smoke alarms in rented property are often just seen as free batteries.

For this reason - hard wired makes sense.
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