4 days test drive Nissan Leaf
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4 days test drive Nissan Leaf

72
Found 19th May 2015
Take New Nissan Leaf for 4 days extended drive.

Charging points map: zap-map.com

Call to book: 01923 899 899 or go to website and let them call you.

Offer runs until 30 Septemebr 2015

72 Comments

Original Poster

Renault Zoe vs Nissan Leaf...

exdido

Renault Zoe vs Nissan Leaf...



Depends if you want to rent the batteries or not, or just buy British :).

But do the right thing and get a golf, fiesta or a proper car you can drive as far as you like

4 day test drive... to find a working electric charging point

Original Poster

eslick

Depends if you want to rent the batteries or not, or just buy British :). … Depends if you want to rent the batteries or not, or just buy British :). But do the right thing and get a golf, fiesta or a proper car you can drive as far as you like


you dont have to buy it! lol

Thought about buying one of these last year, but the wife didn't like the look of them. Maybe if I can get her to take one for a trial she might change her mind

Test drove a zoe last week so nice chance to try a leaf and see what it's like to live with

Original Poster

manicmidlander

Test drove a zoe last week so nice chance to try a leaf and see what it's … Test drove a zoe last week so nice chance to try a leaf and see what it's like to live with


yes same, i have test driven zoe, but only for an hour.

I had a half hour test drive in a Leaf. Utterly awful car. Horrible to drive. Feels like an inert deadweight.

4 days sounds like torture.

Don't judge all electric cars by the Leaf, and similar rubbish. A BMW i3 is a million miles removed from these. Try driving that instead.

Thank you

Had one for a weekend out of curiosity and ended up signing on the dotted line. Very impressed with everything about the car and 2 months on its saving us a small fortune on the daily commute. Taken it away for a few weekends and covered 75 miles a few times with 20+ miles still in the battery. I'd recommend a trial to anyone.

Nearest garage is 76 miles away wonder if it will get to me to start with lol, good for those who live near though

exdido

Renault Zoe vs Nissan Leaf...


Renault Nissan alliance Zoe vs Nissan Renault alliance Leaf.

I had one of these for a 24hr test drive last year, spent 12hrs of it stuck miles away from home next to a free fast charging station that would have had me up and gone in 20mins had the dealer given me the correct charging lead. Never had a follow-up call from that, I think my face said it all when I dropped it back.

It takes a LONG time to charge from a three pin wall socket.

I did like it though, and in the right area with free or very cheap charging it works out to be a really good saving.

It's all about what you use your car for, long journeys on motorways don't really work unless you don't mind the stops at the services for the charging stations because you rarely brake so there is no regenerative energy, plan your journey and it can be cheap though, you just need to do a bit of thinking sometimes.

LotusJas

I had a half hour test drive in a Leaf. Utterly awful car. Horrible to … I had a half hour test drive in a Leaf. Utterly awful car. Horrible to drive. Feels like an inert deadweight.4 days sounds like torture.Don't judge all electric cars by the Leaf, and similar rubbish. A BMW i3 is a million miles removed from these. Try driving that instead.


You must have had the LEAF in Eco mode, when it certainly is more sluggish. Take it out of that mode and it flies. We own a LEAF and wouldn't go back to petrol cars now. In the past month we've done 1,400 miles at a cost of £40. And my LEAF can best most cars away from the lights or into roundabouts.

I spent 11 hours driving (and being recovered to the nearest charge point) from Birmingham to London. Short distances great, long need precision planning. Charge points close after 5pm at dealerships (and are locked behind the gates) to get a Source London top up card (London electricity charge points) takes over a week. Useless on a 7 day test drive. Dealer let me down big time telling me he drives it at 70mph try 55/60 as battery life is better. Range anxiety is very stressful and queuing to charge at Ikea when you have a meeting isnt nice. Other electric drivers lovely (different type of motoring very friendly and helpful - helped me make my meeting.)

Conclusion for urban journeys a great car when you have a charge point installed at home. Test drives don't do it justice as they are reliant on charge points which are very poorly implemented. Some do not work with the app as they haven't activated them (chargemaster polar instant.) If they charged for electricity (its free at the moment) they couldn't as they would get too many complaints!

any one got experience of how many years or miles the battery pack needs to be replaced?

terriclarkfan

You must have had the LEAF in Eco mode, when it certainly is more … You must have had the LEAF in Eco mode, when it certainly is more sluggish. Take it out of that mode and it flies. We own a LEAF and wouldn't go back to petrol cars now. In the past month we've done 1,400 miles at a cost of £40. And my LEAF can best most cars away from the lights or into roundabouts.



No, I tried it briefly in Eco and it was far worse than in normal mode. I don't dispute it is VERY cheap to run. I agree. But it is also the worst car I have driven in a decade.

Original Poster

splender

any one got experience of how many years or miles the battery pack needs … any one got experience of how many years or miles the battery pack needs to be replaced?


The battery pack is expected to retain 70% to 80% of its capacity after 10 years but its actual lifespan depends on how often DC fast charging (480 volts DC) is used and also on driving patterns and environmental factors. Nissan said the battery will lose capacity gradually over time but it expects a lifespan of over 10 years under normal use. The 2011/12 Leaf's battery was initially guaranteed by Nissan for eight years or 100,000 miles

exdido

The battery pack is expected to retain 70% to 80% of its capacity after … The battery pack is expected to retain 70% to 80% of its capacity after 10 years but its actual lifespan depends on how often DC fast charging (480 volts DC) is used and also on driving patterns and environmental factors. Nissan said the battery will lose capacity gradually over time but it expects a lifespan of over 10 years under normal use. The 2011/12 Leaf's battery was initially guaranteed by Nissan for eight years or 100,000 miles


Well, the 2.1p a mile energy is a lie then, as to compare it to petrol cost you have to factor in the cost of battery capital investment which is at least 5p a mile extra (if battery pack is £5000 including garage labour plus environmental disposal). The extra charging alternator(s) must wear out at 100,000 miles....

I think 4 days test drive,cant wrong but only for town trips from what as been said.

splender

Well, the 2.1p a mile energy is a lie then, as to compare it to petrol … Well, the 2.1p a mile energy is a lie then, as to compare it to petrol cost you have to factor in the cost of battery capital investment which is at least 5p a mile extra (if battery pack is £5000 including garage labour plus environmental disposal). The extra charging alternator(s) must wear out at 100,000 miles....



I reckon if you factor in the replacement cost of a new engine and turbo , perhaps clutch and gearbox as well for that matter , then I think it would be a fair comparison. Also , unless you obtain a motor warranty and pay your premiums each year then the cost of any breakdowns to your engine/clutch/gearbox/turbo will not be covered. I have also found that warranty companies tend not to cover cars over 10 years old / 100k miles and if they do then cover is restricted and premiums are high.

LotusJas

I had a half hour test drive in a Leaf. Utterly awful car. Horrible to … I had a half hour test drive in a Leaf. Utterly awful car. Horrible to drive. Feels like an inert deadweight.4 days sounds like torture.Don't judge all electric cars by the Leaf, and similar rubbish. A BMW i3 is a million miles removed from these. Try driving that instead.


Must be trolling. The Leaf, as any other electric car, has 100% torque from 0rpm and basically shoots from stop like a bullet, you can easily beat 99% petrol cars on the road near you, be they BMW or whatever.
I have posted a lot of things against buying an electric car right now, but it is certainly not an inert deadweight, it is very much fun to drive.

TheDr-UK

I had one of these for a 24hr test drive last year, spent 12hrs of it … I had one of these for a 24hr test drive last year, spent 12hrs of it stuck miles away from home next to a free fast charging station that would have had me up and gone in 20mins had the dealer given me the correct charging lead. Never had a follow-up call from that, I think my face said it all when I dropped it back. It takes a LONG time to charge from a three pin wall socket. I did like it though, and in the right area with free or very cheap charging it works out to be a really good saving.It's all about what you use your car for, long journeys on motorways don't really work unless you don't mind the stops at the services for the charging stations because you rarely brake so there is no regenerative energy, plan your journey and it can be cheap though, you just need to do a bit of thinking sometimes.


Even if you drive in town and break often, regenerative energy from breaking is insignificant, would only improve your range by 1%, which would be about 0.8 miles...

always surprised why people even mention regenerative breaking.
Manufacturers charge you thousands for a stereo/sat nav option, but put regenerative breaking systems in. I would say it would be fa rmore efficient to sell the car cheaper so more people can afford it.

Also, regarding the charging stations on the motorway, don;t take them for granted. What if they are in use when you get there? The chances of that happening increase every day

MaximusRo

Even if you drive in town and break often, regenerative energy from … Even if you drive in town and break often, regenerative energy from breaking is insignificant, would only improve your range by 1%, which would be about 0.8 miles... always surprised why people even mention regenerative breaking.Manufacturers charge you thousands for a stereo/sat nav option, but put regenerative breaking systems in. I would say it would be fa rmore efficient to sell the car cheaper so more people can afford it.Also, regarding the charging stations on the motorway, don;t take them for granted. What if they are in use when you get there? The chances of that happening increase every day



Regenerative energy is not just from braking, coasting, slowing down when the wheels are returning power to the batteries, the whole setup around town increases the battery life in ways that motorway driving cannot.
In a normal car a motorway drive at 56mph is one of the most efficient, as you are using the energy from the fuel purely to push the car through the air, around towns you are starting, stopping, braking, everything that uses more fuel, in an electric vehicle the design recovers as much as that as is possible, with battery range over 10, even 20% in my experience.

Cars could be made much cheaper by selling them with thinner metal (less weight to move) no spare wheels, using older designs to cut out r&d budgets etc etc, the thing is, nobody wants to drive a Yugo, if you're buying a new car, you want a good one, a car is an aspirational product, a Fiat 126 will get you from A-B, but a Jaguar will get you there in more comfort.

Manchester, at the moment, has 50 electric cars registered to residents, along with 250 charging stations, it may sound like a lot, but who's going to buy an electric car if you can't find somewhere to charge it. The infrastructure has to be there first. If any motorway services finds that it's charging stations are always full, they'll fit more, it's just economic sense.

TheDr-UK

Regenerative energy is not just from braking, coasting, slowing down when … Regenerative energy is not just from braking, coasting, slowing down when the wheels are returning power to the batteries, the whole setup around town increases the battery life in ways that motorway driving cannot.In a normal car a motorway drive at 56mph is one of the most efficient, as you are using the energy from the fuel purely to push the car through the air, around towns you are starting, stopping, braking, everything that uses more fuel, in an electric vehicle the design recovers as much as that as is possible, with battery range over 10, even 20% in my experience. Cars could be made much cheaper by selling them with thinner metal (less weight to move) no spare wheels, using older designs to cut out r&d budgets etc etc, the thing is, nobody wants to drive a Yugo, if you're buying a new car, you want a good one, a car is an aspirational product, a Fiat 126 will get you from A-B, but a Jaguar will get you there in more comfort. Manchester, at the moment, has 50 electric cars registered to residents, along with 250 charging stations, it may sound like a lot, but who's going to buy an electric car if you can't find somewhere to charge it. The infrastructure has to be there first. If any motorway services finds that it's charging stations are always full, they'll fit more, it's just economic sense.


So town and motorway can't benefit from regenarative breaking, but it is still worth mentioning. What else is there?
Long post for a 0.8 miles range increase. As this is all it might bring you. And you know it.

As for comparing the utility of that with selling cars with thinner metal, no spare wheels... yes, that is exactly what is happening. Renault makes lots of models with fiber glass side wings, "space saver" spare wheels and even cars without a spare wheel (just a repair kit) are already in production.

Motorway drive at 56mph? Wow, some say 70 is too low already, as it is the lowest limit in Europe.

And building a strawman argument about people not wanting a Yugo because I somehow suggested in your opinion to cut r&d to cut costs? LOl... that is your suggestion only, I never said that and hello, didn't really hear anyone saying the Leaf is a great design anyway.

Manchester statistics link please? But I thought we were talking about motorway stations? lol again

What a useless post... as useless as the regenerative breaking system. Drive a Leaf and see how much you get from it, even trying your best to use it to your advantage.

I was needing a car rental for 3 days maybe 4 now I can just use this instead and better still save some ££££'s too. (Only joking)
Edited by: "guildwarschamp" 22nd May 2015

I like the idea but there are simply not enough charge points yet. For most of our driving it would be fine, but our parents are about 150 miles away from us (in different directions), what is a 2 to 3 hour drive currently becomes a 3 to 4 hour drive (assuming the chargers are available, have the right sockets, and working) as we have to factor in a charge somewhere or hire a car for the trip.

Before I seriously consider an electric car there needs to be more standardisation to make it as easy to "fill" as a petrol/diesel car, that means one standard for chargers not the mix there currently are depending who made the car, , or the ability to swap a battery out quickly anywhere, so that means standard battery packs , and one way to pay (ideally by card like my diesel car) , not having to join a bunch if networks on the off chance i may need it.

Sat at Dyffryn NT property as I type and charging my leaf for free with a standard type 2 socket charging point with my own charging.cable. These charging points will charge any EV as the difference is on the car end of the lead. Also nearly all rapid chargers have multi heads to charge any common EV
so do some research before passing comment.

Mmmm....tempting....always wondered what these cars were like to drive....silently.....:{

rozed

Sat at Dyffryn NT property as I type and charging my leaf for free with a … Sat at Dyffryn NT property as I type and charging my leaf for free with a standard type 2 socket charging point with my own charging.cable. These charging points will charge any EV as the difference is on the car end of the lead. Also nearly all rapid chargers have multi heads to charge any common EV so do some research before passing comment.



I have but not recently, that's what put me off even entertaining the idea of a totally electric vehicle.

Its good its getting better but its still not there yet to drive mass take up.

It's finding a charge point that's the hardest thing, not buying or financing it.

i got a 4.5 333bhp bmw and my missus a nissan leaf and i can say its a pleasure to drive just as smooth and fast of the mark in non eco and £10 a month in electric is alot better than £10 per day.

Even in eco mode its good.

And its big and has space and because it is silent i can take it without her knowning.

Cheers just got one today borrowed till Tuesday a great drive and 30 min charge gets you 100 mile

So not really worth taking one of these to a track day then?


MaximusRo

Must be trolling. The Leaf, as any other electric car, has 100% torque … Must be trolling. The Leaf, as any other electric car, has 100% torque from 0rpm and basically shoots from stop like a bullet, you can easily beat 99% petrol cars on the road near you, be they BMW or whatever.I have posted a lot of things against buying an electric car right now, but it is certainly not an inert deadweight, it is very much fun to drive.



Trolling? Not at all. I am completely serious. The Leaf is the worst car I have driven in a decade. Slow slow slow. Utterly inert chassis. Horrible to drive.

I did not say electric cars are like that. I said the Leaf is. Nissan Lead more like

I even suggested an alternative electric car in my first post, that I said was infinitely better - the BMW i3. I said don't judge all electric cars by the Leaf, as that is so bad.

leaf is a great car, its as spacious and practical as an ordinary hatchback. very smooth and has great acceleration when not in eco mode. its purely a city car and pretty crap on the motorway as the range drops drastically. think it was 48hrs test drive before but we borrowed one for 4 days before we bought ours, just asked the dealer if we could have it longer. but don't expect the dealer to give you the correct cards and leads, found them pretty useless. if you have a search around you can pick one of these up pretty cheap

Did this for a week last year. The car only charges to about 85% on the rapid chargers. This reduces range to around 70 miles , 80 at best. I have a 40 mile round trip commute so had to charge it daily. IKEA have a charge point if you're near one. The 2.1p per mile is based on economy 7 from 2013 . it will cost about 20p per hour to charge at home and takes around 8 hours to charge fully 100%. Was a lot of messing about to be honest and although a great idea in principle, battery range is still a big issue for me personally. If your doing 10 miles a day and can charge it away from home for free go for it.

why they can't make a car that runs on tap water?

whoknew

why they can't make a car that runs on tap water?



Ask this question in any large group and someone always says that they knew someone whose relative invented just that, only the government or big oil silenced them by buying up the patent or killing them or some such.

rugbee

Had one for a weekend out of curiosity and ended up signing on the dotted … Had one for a weekend out of curiosity and ended up signing on the dotted line. Very impressed with everything about the car and 2 months on its saving us a small fortune on the daily commute. Taken it away for a few weekends and covered 75 miles a few times with 20+ miles still in the battery. I'd recommend a trial to anyone.



You paid £18k for a car to save you money? Nice one.
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