4 Watt MR16 LED Bulb - Wide Beam Angle (50 Watt Replacement) - £7.09 delivered @ ledhut + 2 year warranty +  10.1% TCB
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4 Watt MR16 LED Bulb - Wide Beam Angle (50 Watt Replacement) - £7.09 delivered @ ledhut + 2 year warranty + 10.1% TCB

44
Found 5th Jan 2013
Been searching for a quality product from the UK for piece of mind and this fits the bill.
This is guaranteed for 2 yrs rather than the ones on ebay /Amazon

4 Watt MR16 LED Bulb - Wide Beam Angle (50 Watt Replacement)
SKU: MR16-320
» Uses up to 90% less energy than a standard halogen bulb.
» Lasts up to 20 times longer than a standard halogen bulb.
» 2 Year Warranty - 14 day money back guarantee.

RRP £19.99

Ensure you use 20% off discount code:
2013
and go via TBC


Product Qty Subtotal
4 Watt MR16 LED Bulb - Wide Beam Angle (50 Watt Replacement) 1 £7.39
Shipping £0.00
Subtotal £7.39
Discount (2013) -£1.48
VAT £1.18
Grand total £7.09
+ 10.1% topcashback
= £6.38

INFORMATION
Lumens: 320
Beam Angle: 120
Power Consumption: 4 W
Size:50X45MM
Input Power: 12V
Replacement For: 50W
Wattage: 4 W
Voltage: 12 V
Average Life in Hrs: 50000
Dimmable (Option): NO
Base: MR16 / GU5.3
Colour: COOL AND WARM

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
These high quality 12 Volt MR16 energy saving LED bulbs are designed for domestic, commercial and retail lighting, and are a direct replacement for existing MR16 Halogen bulbs.

Our 4 Watt MR16 bulbs feature 20 individual High Power 5050 SMD LEDs (highest quality chip) with a clear glass cover which produce a light output of an incredible 320 lumens. They are aesthetically and intelligently designed to significantly reduce energy consumption by up to 90% and deliver long life performance: matching and incredible maintenance free 50,000 hours of use.

Our 4 Watt MR16 bulbs give out a huge 120 degree beam angle of light, and are designed to give the widest beam angle of any SMD bulb on the market.
Also available in Cool White and in Warm White, LEDHut's SMD bulbs are the best on the market!

LEDHut is a brand you can trust, with years of lighting experience, we invest heavily in quality control and sourcing the best component parts available to us. We pride ourselves on quality and innovation, offering a comprehensive 2-year warranty and 14-day money back guarantee on all our LED bulbs, to ensure peace of mind and make sure you are 100% satisfied with your purchase.

These LED bulbs are a standard size and are a direct replacement for your existing Halogen MR16 bulbs. For a small investment you could have recovered the cost of your purchase within 6 months of installing your New MR16 Led bulbs. Not only will you have recovered the complete cost of your investment, but you will continue to save the same amount of money every 6 months over the expected 50,000 hour life of the bulb.*

PLEASE REMEMBER:

These 12v LED lights need to run off a Driver/Transformer. Your existing transformer may not be LED compatible. Please visit our transformer section if you require new transformers.
Swapping your existing bulbs to LED lights will not only increase your bank balance but it will also help save our planet by reducing your carbon footprint.
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44 Comments
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Pound to a penny these are made in China too. Not that it's actually an issue. These are old-tech SMD lamps anyway.

Edited by: "89quidyoucantgowrong" 5th Jan 2013
Avatar
deleted117705
I would definitely want to see these working before purchasing the 12 we have in our house.
They may save money but it is a huge outlay in the first place.
I saw similar in Aldi today, think they were less than this.
Really fancy buying these although wonder what the pay back would be compared to traditional lamps noting that I've got 10 just in the kitchen.

B

They're a calculator on their page. If you use your 10 bulbs in your kitchen, 4 hours a day ......
LED Energy Saving Calculator
How many bulbs do you have in your house? 10
On average, how many hours per day are your lights on for? 4
Based on your results you will save
£9.31 per month on your lighting bill
The money you’ll save on your lighting bill you will mean you’ll pay off your LED bulbs in just 6 months


bomberman

Really fancy buying these although wonder what the pay back would be … Really fancy buying these although wonder what the pay back would be compared to traditional lamps noting that I've got 10 just in the kitchen.B

Headingley_Lad

They're a calculator on their page. If you use your 10 bulbs in your … They're a calculator on their page. If you use your 10 bulbs in your kitchen, 4 hours a day ......LED Energy Saving CalculatorHow many bulbs do you have in your house? 10On average, how many hours per day are your lights on for? 4Based on your results you will save£9.31 per month on your lighting billThe money you’ll save on your lighting bill you will mean you’ll pay off your LED bulbs in just 6 months



cool story bro, tell it again.
Is installing these bulbs as a replacement for current Halogen MR16s (and seeing if they work), the only way to discover if you need to change the transformer?

Thank you in anticipation.
I fitted cheap 1w mr16 leds in the existing fittings when we moved house 5 years ago, leaving 1x20w halogen in each strip as well for a spot.
All have worked a treat, with 1 failing.
My other half found the halogens all round far too bright when we moved in so she was happy with the new light levels.
So gone from 100w per fitting (5 bulb strips), to 24w.
We have 6 sets of strips around the house, so there was quite a noticeable drop in consumption.
These look interesting as I'm tempted by running 5x4w instead, but they really need to be half the price before I can justify that.
bomberman

Really fancy buying these although wonder what the pay back would be … Really fancy buying these although wonder what the pay back would be compared to traditional lamps noting that I've got 10 just in the kitchen.B

10 in the kitchen @ 50 watts each =500 watts. Assume electricity is 12p per KW/H unit, then they cost 6p per hour to use.
If you have them on 3 hours a day, that's 18p per day or about £66 per year.

10@ 4 watts each = 40 watts. That's 0.04 kw/h. This is about 0.5p per hour or 1.5p for 3 hours use per day. This adds up to about £5.50 per year, so a saving of about £60 per year.

If you can buy them for £6 each, the saving might be made after the first year (if I have my sums correct). If your electricity is dearer then the costs are obviously higher, so the payback time is faster.
To me energy saving yes, money saving not so sure, I has over forty GU10 and MR16 led bulbs, price range from £5 to £16 each (1w to 9w), two stop working just after less than two months, eight gone within two years.
Mind you they said 5w led = 50w normal bulb, I reckon about 35w, also not last as long as they said.
thanks will have a look
Also need to be aware that the light from some of the cheaper ones of these is a bit oddly coloured - I got a pair which were distinctly green and made everyone look ill, and a pair which were way too blue. Both were nominally white. So if you are buying some for a large area but a couple of spares because if one goes you will almost definitely not get one to match the colour.
I'd also point out that the 'waste' heat that standard bulbs put out is not waste at all!

Every watt put out by the bulb is a watt that the central heating doesn't have to put out , therefore saving gas. This is true for 8-9 months of the year.
So the saving is the cost of heat produced in high summer plus the difference in cost between gas/oil price and electricity per watt.

It is the usual 'Greenwash' to claim it all as 'saving money'
rotor

I'd also point out that the 'waste' heat that standard bulbs put out is … I'd also point out that the 'waste' heat that standard bulbs put out is not waste at all! Every watt put out by the bulb is a watt that the central heating doesn't have to put out...



Unfortunately that heat is in the ceiling void above the room you are in so not much use at all. You wouldn't come in to a house on a cold winter day and stand under a light bulb to get warm would you?
Keep meaning to replace our kitchen lights, but after 5 years, none of the halogens have failed yet so don't even know what fittings they are!
Edited by: "stevemarsbar" 6th Jan 2013
89quidyoucantgowrong

Pound to a penny these are made in China too. Not that it's actually an … Pound to a penny these are made in China too. Not that it's actually an issue. These are old-tech SMD lamps anyway.



What's the new tech then?
bigsky

Unfortunately that heat is in the ceiling void above the room you are in … Unfortunately that heat is in the ceiling void above the room you are in so not much use at all. You wouldn't come in to a house on a cold winter day and stand under a light bulb to get warm would you?



If that ceiling void was cold then there would be a flow of heat from your room to the void. That means that your central heating system still heats up the void, whether you like it or not.
I have 10 x 1 watt led bulbs around the outside of my bungalow which replaced 2 x 60 watt bulbs, they have been in for 3 years and were the cheapest I could find on Ebay,, and yes made in China cost me £20 for 10 and look excellent...wonderful value for money. I also have .10 x 1 x watt in my kitchen which also work very nicely,, have been in 2 years and only 1 has failed.
I dont quite understand all of this anti China attitude.. take a look around your house and garden and tlook just how many products you have that have Chinese parts or completely made in China,,, the take a look at your car/bike.......
rotor

I'd also point out that the 'waste' heat that standard bulbs put out is … I'd also point out that the 'waste' heat that standard bulbs put out is not waste at all! Every watt put out by the bulb is a watt that the central heating doesn't have to put out , therefore saving gas. This is true for 8-9 months of the year.So the saving is the cost of heat produced in high summer plus the difference in cost between gas/oil price and electricity per watt.It is the usual 'Greenwash' to claim it all as 'saving money'



Take it this is a joke, no one could possibly be this stupid
luminox

I have 10 x 1 watt led bulbs around the outside of my bungalow which … I have 10 x 1 watt led bulbs around the outside of my bungalow which replaced 2 x 60 watt bulbs, they have been in for 3 years and were the cheapest I could find on Ebay,, and yes made in China cost me £20 for 10 and look excellent...wonderful value for money. I also have .10 x 1 x watt in my kitchen which also work very nicely,, have been in 2 years and only 1 has failed.I dont quite understand all of this anti China attitude.. take a look around your house and garden and tlook just how many products you have that have Chinese parts or completely made in China,,, the take a look at your car/bike.......



It's not anti China, it's anti China Crap. Yes plenty of quality products are manufactured in China, the problem is for each factory producing quality goods another 10 will be making cheap crap copies. I've tried the cheap led's from ebay/amazon sellers and they all failed within a few months.
mtc1

Take it this is a joke, no one could possibly be this stupid


I'm with rotor - held that view for a long time ... so I'm "that stupid" too.
mtc1

Take it this is a joke, no one could possibly be this stupid



What don't you understand?
mtc1 - are you one of those people who just hurls abuse rather than explain what they disagree with?
Which bit don't you agree with and why?
pghstochaj

What don't you understand?



I genuinely thought this was a joke or trolling. But i'll explain if you want. As an example we'll say your house uses 20x 50w Halogen bulbs = total wattage 1000w, replace those with 20x 4.5w quality led lamps and your wattage drops to 90.

You are therefore using 910w to provide heat, if you must use electricity to provide heat you should be using high efficiency electric heaters not light bulbs.

I am amazed that people would actually think Halogen is an effecient way to provide heat let alone light.
Edited by: "mtc1" 6th Jan 2013
mtc1

I genuinely thought this was a joke or trolling. But i'll explain if you … I genuinely thought this was a joke or trolling. But i'll explain if you want. As an example we'll say your house uses 20x 50w Halogen bulbs = total wattage 1000w, replace those with 20x 4.5w quality led lamps and your wattage drops to 90.You are therefore using 910w to provide heat, if you must use electricity to provide heat you should be using high efficiency electric heaters not light bulbs. I am amazed that people would actually think Halogen is an effecient way to provide heat let alone light.



I think you need to go away and understand what you are talking about!

High efficiency electrical heaters? What are they? A light bulb and a electrical heater are equally efficient as a heater excepting the amount of energy used to produce light (which is useful).



Well there is no such thing as "efficient" (or inefficient) electric heaters. All the electricity that gets to the heater is turned to heat. ( no pedants ; not now). Any inefficiency is at the generating stage ( which is one reason why electricity is more expensive than gas.)

Neither did i claim that light bulbs are the best way to heat a house - I say that the heat produced is not wasted and therefore only SOME of the claimed cost savings are justified.
pghstochaj

I think you need to go away and understand what you are talking … I think you need to go away and understand what you are talking about!High efficiency electrical heaters? What are they? A light bulb and a electrical heater are equally efficient as a heater excepting the amount of energy used to produce light (which is useful).



I give up, the lack of intelligence on this site is truly astounding
mtc1

I give up, the lack of intelligence on this site is truly astounding



Feel free to remain ignorant.
pghstochaj

Feel free to remain ignorant.



Ok, will do . I'm sure you are also aware that a light bulb generates heat through electrical resistance, an electric heater uses electrical resistance but more effeciently than a light bulb. Neither are very effecient compared to either gas or hot air heating but again i'm sure you know this. Add this to the fact hot air rises, the ceiling is not the best place for a heater is it?
Edited by: "mtc1" 6th Jan 2013
Those who assume inefficient lightbulbs heat their house are missing a key point that a residential property is not a lossless thermal mass of uniform temperature. The theory that lightbulbs reduce central heating requirements would only work in a perfectly insulated system with stable temperature.


Edited by: "bigsky" 6th Jan 2013
smokieUK

Also need to be aware that the light from some of the cheaper ones of … Also need to be aware that the light from some of the cheaper ones of these is a bit oddly coloured - I got a pair which were distinctly green and made everyone look ill, and a pair which were way too blue. Both were nominally white. So if you are buying some for a large area but a couple of spares because if one goes you will almost definitely not get one to match the colour.





agree
bigsky

Those who assume inefficient lightbulbs heat their house are missing a … Those who assume inefficient lightbulbs heat their house are missing a key point that a residential property is not a lossless thermal mass of uniform temperature. The theory that lightbulbs reduce central heating requirements would only work in a perfectly insulated system with stable temperature.



So you're saying that heat from sources other than the central heating system does not reduce the requirement of energy from the central heating system to maintain a selected temperature?

The fact that a house is not an adiabatic system is quite irrelevant for this point since the heat exchange between the house and the outside is controlled by the temperature driving force (Q=UAdT). Aslong as dT is the same, then Q will be the same, regardless of whether the energy has come from inefficient lights or the central heating system. The relevant point is that the internal parts of the house impact heat transfer - such as uninsulated or insulated ceilings. However, if the room temperature is greater than the temperature in the ceiling voids, then heat will still transfer to that area regardless of where it has come from.

The original comment is perfectly correct - assuming that heat produced from inefficient lighting is wasted is wrong.

320 Lumen seems rather low output for a supposed 50 watt halogen equivalent, I'm pretty sure a 50 watt halogen should be 600+ lumen.
melted

320 Lumen seems rather low output for a supposed 50 watt halogen … 320 Lumen seems rather low output for a supposed 50 watt halogen equivalent, I'm pretty sure a 50 watt halogen should be 600+ lumen.



You are correct but comparing lux, lumens and beam angles isn't really relevant to most people. It's about what they actually see, i have 4.5w high quality led's (300 lumens) throughout the house and i don't notice any real difference to the 50w Halogens they replaced. The technical aspect of the led's on my reef tank is vital but for my kitchen as long as it looks good i'm not realy bothered.
pghstochaj

So you're saying that heat from sources other than the central heating … So you're saying that heat from sources other than the central heating system does not reduce the requirement of energy from the central heating system to maintain a selected temperature?



Yes, in a typical residential property when the heat sources you talk of are halogen lights mounted in ceiling voids.

pghstochaj

The fact that a house is not an adiabatic system is quite irrelevant for … The fact that a house is not an adiabatic system is quite irrelevant for this point since the heat exchange between the house and the outside is controlled by the temperature driving force (Q=UAdT). Aslong as dT is the same, then Q will be the same, regardless of whether the energy has come from inefficient lights or the central heating system. The relevant point is that the internal parts of the house impact heat transfer - such as uninsulated or insulated ceilings. However, if the room temperature is greater than the temperature in the ceiling voids, then heat will still transfer to that area regardless of where it has come from.The original comment is perfectly correct - assuming that heat produced from inefficient lighting is wasted is wrong.



Congratulations on your attempt to use Google or Wikipedia to supplement your limited knowledge of physics but you are so very wrong. Take it from somebody that actually went to school. (You also do not understand what adiabatic means).

Stop wasting our time; more efficient lighting is good thing with a net benefit to the end user.
pghstochaj

So you're saying that heat from sources other than the central heating … So you're saying that heat from sources other than the central heating system does not reduce the requirement of energy from the central heating system to maintain a selected temperature?

pghstochaj

The fact that a house is not an adiabatic system is quite irrelevant for … The fact that a house is not an adiabatic system is quite irrelevant for this point since the heat exchange between the house and the outside is controlled by the temperature driving force (Q=UAdT). Aslong as dT is the same, then Q will be the same, regardless of whether the energy has come from inefficient lights or the central heating system. The relevant point is that the internal parts of the house impact heat transfer - such as uninsulated or insulated ceilings. However, if the room temperature is greater than the temperature in the ceiling voids, then heat will still transfer to that area regardless of where it has come from.The original comment is perfectly correct - assuming that heat produced from inefficient lighting is wasted is wrong.



MEng CEng MIChemE... I think I understand what adiabatic means. Your choice to remain ignorant. Where do you think the electrical energy goes?
pghstochaj

MEng CEng MIChemE... I think I understand what adiabatic means.



I would have hoped so, but apparently not.

Meanwhile back in the real world you are claiming that energy inefficient lights are heating the voids in the ceiling above the rooms we are in (regardless of whether we want those voids to be warm or not) and that is somehow a good thing. You do sound very foolish.
Go on, explain why I am wrong then, with the lights and adiabatic systems.

So far you have used worlds like "efficient heaters", so I am not holding out much hope.
pghstochaj

So far you have used worlds like "efficient heaters", so I am not holding … So far you have used worlds like "efficient heaters", so I am not holding out much hope.



Eh?

The moment you quoted your academic qualifications (or at least the ones you may get one day when you do grow up) showed you up to be a troll, and I am guessing one that probably lives at home with his mum. Go and bug someone else with your ideal that stupidly inefficient lighting ain't so bad.

Edited by: "bigsky" 6th Jan 2013
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