40 AA Batteries for £6.96 DELIVERED @ CPC
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40 AA Batteries for £6.96 DELIVERED @ CPC

32
Found 23rd May 2017
Good deal I reckon.
Hope somebody could save some penny on AA batteries.
But no idea about the quality.
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32 Comments
checked the AAA, they were still full price...
anyone know a. good deal for high quality AAA batteries as well please?
polarbaba

checked the AAA, they were still full price...anyone know a. good deal … checked the AAA, they were still full price...anyone know a. good deal for high quality AAA batteries as well please?


IKEA
Battery alkaline
ALKALISK £1.95/10 pack
I also had a box of these and they worked fine
Uniross AAA x96 for £9.99 delivered at eBay
ebay.co.uk/itm…d69
should just go for rechargables and save your money
Edited by: "prynolfc" 23rd May 2017
prynolfc

should just go for rechargables and save your money



Put rechargeables in school clocks and get them stolen? No thanks.
still more than the Kodak extra life from poundland £1 for six, which are highly recommended / rated.
Battery Cell Cost\x09@ Pack From\x09 mAh mWh

Kodak Xtralife\x09Ak\x09£0.17\x096\x09Poundland\x092107\x092454\x09
Ikea Alkalisk4\x09Ak\x09£0.19\x0910\x09Ikea\x09 2270\x092647\x09
Edited by: "Robert_Mugabe" 23rd May 2017
prynolfc

should just go for rechargables and save your money



​I have recharchables and use them where appropriate. for low discharge stuff the the internal self discharge of the batteries means it shows low battery very quick especially when it's 1.2v Vs 1.5v. some of my stuff shuts down due to perceived low battery. so I use a combination of alkaline and recharchables.
whenever i used IKEA AA batteries they were not as good and some were simply faulty. I decided not to buy them again despite the great price and i have one nearby. I tried on 3 different occasions, maybe I got unlucky, however I haven't had any such issues with other brands.
are the pound land Kodak alkalines OK?
polarbaba

checked the AAA, they were still full price...anyone know a. good deal … checked the AAA, they were still full price...anyone know a. good deal for high quality AAA batteries as well please?



£6.89 for the same AAA
BT0561807
polarbaba

are the pound land Kodak alkalines OK?



I get these also, plus the Sony ones. They always do the job for me.
Edited by: "Rich_T" 23rd May 2017
cheers guys
Searcher2

Put rechargeables in school clocks and get them stolen? No thanks.



kids nicking rechargeable batteries, what a time to be alive
prynolfc

should just go for rechargables and save your money



Always get one saying that reality is that you they are not always suitable
Searcher2

Put rechargeables in school clocks and get them stolen? No thanks.



Hot glue them in place. Wont get stolen then....
Wilkos 99p for 8 AA Alkaline thats £4.95 for 40... that goes for AAA too.


30985953-37rTO.jpg30985953-RP3ph.jpg


edit: seems they recently increased the price of the batteries to

£1.40 a pack, so that means its still £7 for 40.




Edited by: "Ninjesus" 23rd May 2017
samcatch8 m ago

Hot glue them in place. Wont get stolen then....


then how the hell does he remove them to charge lol
they're pretty decent - got them about the house and cant complain
samcatch

Hot glue them in place. Wont get stolen then....


Can't work out if being ironic
prynolfc

should just go for rechargables and save your money



I have loads of rechargeable batteries, but I keep coming back to alkalines for certain things as rechargeables just don't have the same oomph: they're only delivering about 1.2V as opposed to the 1.5V of alkalines.

e.g. I use alkalines in my wireless weather station, as rechargeables hardly last any time at all.
Searcher2

Put rechargeables in school clocks and get them stolen? No thanks.


Congratulations - you show that it's the exception that proves the rule.

(The point is that yes, there are a few applications where it is better to use disposables, but the vast majority of them are bought by people without the imagination to use rechargeables, generating large amounts of waste and hitting them in the pocket into the bargain.)
pibpob

Congratulations - you show that it's the exception that proves the … Congratulations - you show that it's the exception that proves the rule.(The point is that yes, there are a few applications where it is better to use disposables, but the vast majority of them are bought by people without the imagination to use rechargeables, generating large amounts of waste and hitting them in the pocket into the bargain.)



I use rechargeables where possible but there are quite a few instances where the 1.2v rather than 1.5v causes issues. Our ear thermometer eats batteries but irritatingly won't run on rechargeables...bluddy nuisance!
fubar888

I use rechargeables where possible but there are quite a few instances … I use rechargeables where possible but there are quite a few instances where the 1.2v rather than 1.5v causes issues. Our ear thermometer eats batteries but irritatingly won't run on rechargeables...bluddy nuisance!


Yes - there's no excuse for such poor design, especially when you consider that 1.5V for disposables is far less stable than 1.2V for rechargeables. A few things genuinely won't work with them, a few refuse to work because they think the voltage is too low, many will work but display annoying battery warnings, and some will work just fine. It is irritating that manufacturers still unnecessarily warn people off using rechargeables, but then a lot of consumers aren't capable of working out the difference between pre-charged and traditional types, which makes a lot of difference for things with low power drain.
pibpob

Yes - there's no excuse for such poor design, especially when you … Yes - there's no excuse for such poor design, especially when you consider that 1.5V for disposables is far less stable than 1.2V for rechargeables. A few things genuinely won't work with them, a few refuse to work because they think the voltage is too low, many will work but display annoying battery warnings, and some will work just fine. It is irritating that manufacturers still unnecessarily warn people off using rechargeables, but then a lot of consumers aren't capable of working out the difference between pre-charged and traditional types, which makes a lot of difference for things with low power drain.



​in my case some of my devices show low battery on a charged rechargeable battery and shut down not that long into its stable 1.2v phase
Does anyone know whether rechargeable AAAs would be suitable for room thermostats? I have 1.5v alkalines in at the moment, in a new-build property, which have lasted nearly 3 years but are flashing as low charge, so I need to decide on a suitable replacement. Thanks.
troublesome1

Does anyone know whether rechargeable AAAs would be suitable for room … Does anyone know whether rechargeable AAAs would be suitable for room thermostats? I have 1.5v alkalines in at the moment, in a new-build property, which have lasted nearly 3 years but are flashing as low charge, so I need to decide on a suitable replacement. Thanks.


I would hope the low self-discharge (sometimes called pre-charged) types would be fine, but this is one application where it is still sensible to use disposables, as they last so long. Unless the instructions say you can use rechargeables (unlikely), it would be impossible to confirm without trying them.
pibpob

I would hope the low self-discharge (sometimes called pre-charged) types … I would hope the low self-discharge (sometimes called pre-charged) types would be fine, but this is one application where it is still sensible to use disposables, as they last so long. Unless the instructions say you can use rechargeables (unlikely), it would be impossible to confirm without trying them.



The instructions don't seem to specify. I'm inclined to agree with you, however. I think I'll just use Kodak Xtralife AAAs, which at 6 for £1 will be an inexpensive mistake if they turn out to be rubbish.
pibpob

I would hope the low self-discharge (sometimes called pre-charged) types … I would hope the low self-discharge (sometimes called pre-charged) types would be fine, but this is one application where it is still sensible to use disposables, as they last so long. Unless the instructions say you can use rechargeables (unlikely), it would be impossible to confirm without trying them.



​alkalines!,remember low discharge are low and not no-discharge. your actual use is so minimal that the self discharge would be greater than your use.
go lithium-alkaline replacements if you want to change them even less! (but way more expensive )
polarbaba

alkalines!,remember low discharge are low and not no-discharge. your … alkalines!,remember low discharge are low and not no-discharge. your actual use is so minimal that the self discharge would be greater than your use. go lithium-alkaline replacements if you want to change them even less! (but way more expensive )


Agreed - but in addition to the self-discharge, there would be minimal saving both financially and in waste, because they would be replacing so few disposables.
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