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48W Temperature Controlled Ceramic Solder Station £10.99 @ Maplin
48W Temperature Controlled Ceramic Solder Station £10.99  @ Maplin

48W Temperature Controlled Ceramic Solder Station £10.99 @ Maplin

Buy forBuy forBuy for£10.99
GETGet dealVisit site and get deal
Adjustable temperature range of 250°C to 480°C via rotary dial
LED to indicate when ceramic heater is in use plus illuminated on/off switch
Complete with side mounting iron holder - can be mounted on either side for left or right handed users
Rubber around the iron handle ensures a firm grip whilst soldering
Fitted with a tray and sponge

DELIVERY is £2.99 (FREE for orders £35 or more)

Available Online & in Maplin stores

Price drop to £10.99 and extra £1 off using code SECRET1
- harlzter

22 Comments

Original Poster

http://images.maplin.co.uk/full/N91HR.jpg

Original Poster

harlzter;8976289

Direct link: http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=392943



thanks :thumbsup:

yoghurtlidlicker;8976406

thanks :thumbsup:


No probs, the maplins links always end up messed up on here.

This looks good value but seems "too" cheap, anyone bought one and can comment?

Original Poster

harlzter;8976497

No probs, the maplins links always end up messed up on here.This looks … No probs, the maplins links always end up messed up on here.This looks good value but seems "too" cheap, anyone bought one and can comment?



It is simillar to one from Russ Andrews ]shop :w00t:

I'd avoid, we had one that lasted a week, they sent another which lasted 2 days!
It would take ages to reach temperature as well then as soon as you touched the joint it would cool down too much to actually work.

cRuNcHiE;8976997

It would take ages to reach temperature as well then as soon as you … It would take ages to reach temperature as well then as soon as you touched the joint it would cool down too much to actually work.

Ah - I've never actually seen a soldering iron that doesn't state its wattage. Perhaps there's a reason for this one...

Got one little while back. Good piece of kit.

harlzter;8976497

No probs, the maplins links always end up messed up on here.This looks … No probs, the maplins links always end up messed up on here.This looks good value but seems "too" cheap, anyone bought one and can comment?



I had one that is very similar but has a slightly different box. As with other comments, it wasnt bad but it wasnt great either and now doesnt seem to get up to temperature. Plenty of quality irons available on eBay, Maplin & DIY chains tend to sell poor quality irons that are hugely overpriced IMHO. Never seen the benefit of a variable temperature iron myself either personally.

Not voted either way.

pibpob;8976497

I've never actually seen a soldering iron that doesn't state its wattage. … I've never actually seen a soldering iron that doesn't state its wattage. Perhaps there's a reason for this one...



Believe its 48W?

digi dude;8977157

Got one little while back. Good piece of kit.


O rly?

pibpob;8977038

Ah - I've never actually seen a soldering iron that doesn't state its … Ah - I've never actually seen a soldering iron that doesn't state its wattage. Perhaps there's a reason for this one...



48W

Sorry guys - can't see for looking! Surprised it's that bad if it's 48W.

I find a variable temperature iron essential when doing different sorts of soldering work. An uncontrolled temperature iron eats bits very quickly because it gets far too hot. A fixed-temperature iron is much better, but the thermal resistance of the bit means that when there's a lot of metal to heat up it's not so good (its sensor is at the right temperature but where you're soldering isn't). In those circumstances it's useful to be able to increase the temperature.

Further to pitbob's valid comments, a variable temperature iron has a number of advantages when doing intricate work (e.g. model-making and some delicate electronics) where there is a real danger of either damaging small components or de-soldering existing joints nearby. And, if using lowmelt solder (e.g. 70 - 140 degrees), it is usually essential to solder at a reduced temperature to avoid over-heating the solder or melting alloy components.

A cheap way of converting an ordinary iron (say 25 - 40W) to run at a lower temperature is to run it through a dimmer switch. A little experimentation will soon give the best setting for the intended temperature. And, as always, clean and flux all joints and work quickly with enough heat - poking about with a cool bit will never produce a sound joint.

This is very similar to the one they were selling in a blue casing at Xmas. I got one of those (They were £25 down to a tenner) and it's fine for everyday jobs. It's obviously no good for surface mount work or for fiddly PCB stuff. However for the money it's a good deal.

guys, i don't own a soldering iron kit nor have i ever used one

would this be suitable for a first time user and to be able to do vaious electrical stuff if needs be

thanks

Yes it looks like a good starter Iron.

Got one on Amazon for about £8 delivered but this looks very good as well.

techmob;8979400

guys, i don't own a soldering iron kit nor have i ever used onewould this … guys, i don't own a soldering iron kit nor have i ever used onewould this be suitable for a first time user and to be able to do vaious electrical stuff if needs bethanks



Probably, but it depends what you are planning to use it for. I have a 60W iron which is fine for most jobs, but for my RC hobby where I have to solder reasonably heavy duty wire (12awg) to small electronic components a hotter iron (80W) is necessary. This is because with a cooler iron such as this one you have to hold the iron on the contacts longer for the heat to transfer. This means that the heat will transfer to the other parts of the component, whereas with a hot iron you dont need to heat the contacts for as long, hence the heat cannot spread to the other components which is undesirable as it can cause damage to your components.

what about for things such as soldering components or repairing things like xbox 360 etc

Cheers OP. Picked one up today - been after an adjustable for a couple of months, as my other non-adjustable melts the ribbon I'm desoldering from if I'm not quick and accurate. Interestingly, the dial on mine starts at 150 degrees, even though the picture on here and the box says it starts at 250. Guessing it's a printing error.

Original Poster

klargon;8982240

Cheers OP. Picked one up today - been after an adjustable for a couple … Cheers OP. Picked one up today - been after an adjustable for a couple of months, as my other non-adjustable melts the ribbon I'm desoldering from if I'm not quick and accurate. Interestingly, the dial on mine starts at 150 degrees, even though the picture on here and the box says it starts at 250. Guessing it's a printing error.



At least one person's happy :thumbsup::whistling:

Original Poster

NOW it is £10.99!!!
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