500 ml Original T Cut Colour Restorer £1.24 @ Tesco *instore*
296°Expired

500 ml Original T Cut Colour Restorer £1.24 @ Tesco *instore*

21
Found 14th Sep 2010Made hot 14th Sep 2010
Bought this is bellshill tesco petrol station did not see any instore but what a price this is normally between £5 and £7 quid .

21 Comments

Sum1 recommended this to use to clean UPVC.

Any T-Cut metallic or just original?

Banned

I wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for cleaning upvc

deb8z

Sum1 recommended this to use to clean UPVC.



I wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for cleaning upvc

Banned

Be very careful using this on a modern car paint as most are lacquered and this will just remove the protection of the lacquer...it was originally intended for flat paint and not metallics or modern lacquers

slamdunkin

I wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for … I wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for cleaning upvcI wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for cleaning upvc



It was a window fitter who recommended it,i usually use Astonish cleaner.

Banned

Well the window fitter may use it once to clean it up after the installation then walk away, but he knows jack sh't if he thinks you can continually use it.

slamdunkin

I wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for … I wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for cleaning upvcI wouldn't use this as it's an abrasive compound... CIF is great for cleaning upvc




deb8z

It was a window fitter who recommended it,i usually use Astonish cleaner.



Both products are good for cleaning upvc. CIF was what my window fitter used many moons ago (was then known as Jif).

Banned

My apologies for saying he knows Jack sh't....I think he meant this version of T Cut and not the one on offer

T-Cut Non-abrasive UPVC cleaner
motor-world.co.uk/ind…514
Edited by: "slamdunkin" 14th Sep 2010

slamdunkin

My apologies for saying he knows Jack sh't....I think he meant this … My apologies for saying he knows Jack sh't....I think he meant this version of T Cut and not the one on offerT-Cut Non-abrasive UPVC cleanerhttp://www.motor-world.co.uk/index.cfm?product=514



Didn't know such a product existed. Thanks for that.

Great if nationwide. Can't knock it at the price, but do agree needs to be used with caution / sparingly and remember to use a quality top polish to 'seal' in such as AutoGlym Super Resin then Gold finish.

This brings back memories... I remember the old man rubbing down our old Fiat 127 with this stuff...X)

slamdunkin

Be very careful using this on a modern car paint as most are lacquered … Be very careful using this on a modern car paint as most are lacquered and this will just remove the protection of the lacquer...it was originally intended for flat paint and not metallics or modern lacquers



I agree, with virtually all cars using an element of lacquer in their paintwork, this stuff is virtually obsolete. It's alongside Redex in terms of usefulness on todays cars.

slimy31

I agree, with virtually all cars using an element of lacquer in their … I agree, with virtually all cars using an element of lacquer in their paintwork, this stuff is virtually obsolete. It's alongside Redex in terms of usefulness on todays cars.



The above posts are Rubbish

Firstly I have vehicles that have been lacquered since the early 1980s. Lacquer is not new.

Secondly this works on lacquer in the same way as paint. I have used it to remove petrols stains, abrasions and scratches on old lacquered vehicle surfaces. No colour comes off on the rag.
You can also use wet dry abrasive paper on lacquer, just like the body shops do on new paint jobs.
Wet dry paper will not become obsolete for a long time and neither will cutting compounds.

If your car was repainted in base and clear, the paint shop rubs down the lacquer and use cutting compounds and papers to get a perfect finish. If they don't, you can get the orange peel effect in the clear coat.

And yes this can be used on plastic. Ive used it on clear perspex to remove light scratches and dull finishes. Also on old Motocross bike plastic body panels.

For new water based finishes and powder applied lacquer as per BMW, this might not be recommended. But this is a restoration product anyway.
So should still be on sale for a good decade. If it doesn't, its more likely to be because of the chemical content.




slamdunkin

My apologies for saying he knows Jack sh't....I think he meant this … My apologies for saying he knows Jack sh't....I think he meant this version of T Cut and not the one on offerT-Cut Non-abrasive UPVC cleaner[url=http://www.motor-world.co.uk/index.cfm?product=514]http://www.motor-world.co.uk/index.cfm?product=514[/url]



So you're first guessing he knows jack **** and now guessing again that he means another version? unbelievable.

Theres nothing wrong with using either version. The difference will be between cleaning and restoring. No you wouldn't use this as a cleaner but If your plastic windows are old and abrased, then you will a need an abrasive compound to help restore them.
Nothing is perfectly smooth and any plastic thats been well used will never look like new again unless its been re melted (which Ive actually seen a restorer do on plastic car parts, very quickly with a blow lamp)

Ive used abrasive T-cut to restore *clear* perspex side windows in an old race car, they came up very well.




Banned

There is amonia in the standard T-cut so should not be used on plastic or UPVC.

If you are so shore that T cut is fine to use, I expect you wont mind offering to pay for any damage to paintwork caused by your inaccurate advice.


Edited by: "slamdunkin" 15th Sep 2010

slamdunkin

There is amonia in the standard T-cut so should not be used on plastic or … There is amonia in the standard T-cut so should not be used on plastic or UPVC.If you are so shore that T cut is fine to use, I expect you wont mind offering to pay for any damage to paintwork caused by your inaccurate advice.



If people wanted advice they would go to the correct forums on methods to use. My comments are from real world experience and success. They are not inaccurate at all.
I have not advised people on the methods to use, just that a lot of rubbish is being spouted here about what we can and cant do.

You *can* and people *do* use tooth paste, peanut butter, coca cola, tomato ketchup to restore old vehicle parts, and no Im not going to give people money if they go ahead and use those products.
If you're restoring an item, its usually because it looks like crap and needs refreshing.

From experience, the small amount of ammonia is less harmful than the chemicals in the environment that Ive seen eat away at plastic panels over time.

Just in case you failed to notice, this harmful ammonia is being stored in a plastic bottle. And from memory actually stores better in plastic bottle than the old metal T-cut containers.

Ammonia has been used in cleaning for years.

I honestly cant see how someone is stupid enough to expect let alone state that monies should be due from forum posters when using T-cut for alternative restoration purposes.
If people want perfection and a guarantee then buy new windows, simple as that.





Banned

Or they could just use CIF like most window fitters use.

What do you recommend for the rust stains caused from the steel burs and filings left by window fitters?

This has been discussed on DIY forums. Very few, even the good fitters will actually remove the steel filings left after drilling. T-cut in this case would be far less harmful than the shoddy workmanship that litters the window trade.


Banned

Most window fitters will clean up after themselves and to say most will not is a gross exaggeration....if someone get rust marks within a few weeks / months of fitting then you ring the company and get them to come and make good. car T cut will remove the UV protection layer because it is a grinding compound. I had new windows fitted last year and guess what...I didn't get any rust marks.

Hands up who's windows are littered with thousands of tiny rust marks left by their window fitters shoddy workmanship.
Edited by: "slamdunkin" 15th Sep 2010

Gold Feet

The above posts are RubbishFirstly I have vehicles that have been … The above posts are RubbishFirstly I have vehicles that have been lacquered since the early 1980s. Lacquer is not new.Secondly this works on lacquer in the same way as paint. I have used it to remove petrols stains, abrasions and scratches on old lacquered vehicle surfaces. No colour comes off on the rag.You can also use wet dry abrasive paper on lacquer, just like the body shops do on new paint jobs.Wet dry paper will not become obsolete for a long time and neither will cutting compounds.If your car was repainted in base and clear, the paint shop rubs down the lacquer and use cutting compounds and papers to get a perfect finish. If they don't, you can get the orange peel effect in the clear coat.And yes this can be used on plastic. Ive used it on clear perspex to remove light scratches and dull finishes. Also on old Motocross bike plastic body panels.For new water based finishes and powder applied lacquer as per BMW, this might not be recommended. But this is a restoration product anyway. So should still be on sale for a good decade. If it doesn't, its more likely to be because of the chemical content.



I didn't say lacquer was new, it just seems to be a lot more 'in use' now. From what I remember it used to be reserved for metallics and pearlescents, nowadays even solid colours get a lacquer. Personally I wouldn't use any cutting compounds on a lacquer based paint, but as you say people can use what they want. You're right that cutting compounds and W&D are standard issue for paint shops, and will continue to be used to get the best out of a new paint job. I just wouldn't use it at any point after that. I can imagine Mr Average Joe Public thinking this is ok to use on a weekly basis like a wax, and having no lacquer left after a couple of months!

I've got to ask though, is tomato ketchup actually used as a restorer, or was that just an example?


Shall I end this ? Ok...Great deal OP x
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