55 inch Samsung UE55MU6400 + 10% code = £692 plus possible  quidco @ AO
87°Expired

55 inch Samsung UE55MU6400 + 10% code = £692 plus possible quidco @ AO

13
Found 21st Oct
I've just ordered the Samsung UE55MU6400 using code TV4K10 for 10% off. Quidco tracked at £19.23.


I'd been looking for a few weeks for a good deal on a 55 inch TV and this seems to get some good reviews. Not the latest model but I thought under £700 was pretty good.

Code expires tomorrow.

13 Comments

Seems hot to me.

HDR 10?

stoney736 m ago

HDR 10?


Just about all 4K TVs can understand an HDR10 signal. If you're interested in HDR the limitation is the display hardware rather than the format support.

EndlessWaves21 m ago

Just about all 4K TVs can understand an HDR10 signal. If you're interested …Just about all 4K TVs can understand an HDR10 signal. If you're interested in HDR the limitation is the display hardware rather than the format support.


Splitting hairs rather than actually answering the question, can it actually display HDR10?

It wont be a 10 bit panel if thats the debate.
We have one of these in the same range.
Great picture. Really impressive upscaling too.
Sound was pretty decent too but we have seperate speakers so only a set up listen

Rich441 h, 34 m ago

Splitting hairs rather than actually answering the question, can it …Splitting hairs rather than actually answering the question, can it actually display HDR10?


Nothing outside the laboratory can display the full range of brightness and colour HDR10 can encode, even the £30,000+ Dolby Pulsar reference monitors studios use for creating the content fall short.

As I say the limitation is how much the hardware can display. HDR isn't yes or no, it's 'how much?'.

A TV like this only offers wide gamut - it can get brighter in some of the colours but can't increase the brightness range generally (it has no local dimming).
Edited by: "EndlessWaves" 21st Oct

Presume it’s 12 months warranty with ao.com?

I’m looking at the MU7000 and it £899.10 here and £999 elsewhere but 5 or 6 years warranty

Got this TV from JL for £699 in July and have been 100% happy with it.

The Display panel doesn't have to be a 10 bit to be classed as a 10 bit. 8bit+ frame rate control are classified as 10 bit. This is a 8bit+FRC TV.
8bit + FRC means that the display uses a combination of 8-bit colour depth and temporal dithering to produce 10-bit output.
Edited by: "Smadmad" 21st Oct

Smadmad4 h, 5 m ago

The Display panel doesn't have to be a 10 bit to be classed as a 10 bit. …The Display panel doesn't have to be a 10 bit to be classed as a 10 bit. 8bit+ frame rate control are classified as 10 bit. This is a 8bit+FRC TV.8bit + FRC means that the display uses a combination of 8-bit colour depth and temporal dithering to produce 10-bit output.


10-bit SDR output. HDR is a completely different kettle of fish (or electro-optical transfer function, I forget which).

EndlessWaves7 h, 57 m ago

10-bit SDR output. HDR is a completely different kettle of fish (or …10-bit SDR output. HDR is a completely different kettle of fish (or electro-optical transfer function, I forget which).

Ok.............

Phone AO and ask them to price match Electrical Discount @ £729

electricaldiscountuk.co.uk/sto…ner

Then ask them to use their own discount code.
Possible £656. Just ask for the code after the price match.

Despite what the website mentions they do seem to take a code after a price match.

Smadmad7 h, 38 m ago

Ok.............


Only part of the increased bit depth in HDR is used to record intermediate shades (which you can create through dithering). The rest is used for the wider colour gamut and the higher brightness range - both of which are created by the backlight rather than the LCD panel.

I'm not sure exactly how much, but I do know that 100cd/m² in PQ-based formats (HDR10, Dolby Vision) corresponds to level 512 and some of that will be going on the wider gamut or being lost through the very low black values at the bottom of the range that the average TV can't create.

In short, if you want the full 10-bit output then you need a 10,000cd/m² backlight and a 100% Rec. 2020 colour space as those are the values that the ends of the 10-bit HDR data range corresponds to.

Not that I'd disagreeing with your fundamental point that the two are equivalent. Just pointing out that the assumptions for SDR, such as the picture being created solely by changes in the LCD panel, are not valid for HDR.
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