60W SOLDERING STATION 60W £33.05 @  Farnell
318°Expired

60W SOLDERING STATION 60W £33.05 @ Farnell

37
Found 2nd Oct 2014
I've been looking for a reasonable (cheap!) soldering station for a while, and this seems pretty good for the price - temp controlled, ESD protection. FEOCT10 gives 10% off today only, free next-day delivery.

220V, 60W Digital Soldering Station
Supply Voltage V AC: 220V
Heat Temperature Max: 450°C
Output Power: 60W
Plug Type: UK
Output Voltage: 28V
Temperature Stability + @: ±1°C (Static)

Antistatic safety
Three programmable preset temperature buttons
Precise temperature control and computerised temperature calibration
LCD display
Two-core heating element
°C / °F temperature
Additional range of soldering tips available

Contents: Soldering station, soldering iron, stand and sponge

37 Comments

I got one of these a couple of months ago, its great. Heats up very fast, will take Hakko tips and comes with the backing of Farnell, Tenma is one of their brands.

They are a rebadged, Atten which you can get off eBay for a few quid less normally, but you take your chances on the QC.

Well worth the money.

Got the same maplin branded one was £29 but £59 now though £33 is great price though
Found it realty good though be aware the iron is bit non standard though in case you need replacement iron/ element
But plenty of spare bits available cheap on ebay as there fairly standard Hakko type
Its 2 wire as opposed to most been 3 wire ie no separate sensor wire cant really see how temperature control works ?
but it seem,s to work ok

Can anyone tell me what else do I need for basic soldering apart from the station?
Solder flux?
I read that there is a thing that is flux + solder mixed.
Anything else?

Please advise. Thank you.

Got one of these and it heats up in a few seconds. I like that the holder can be moved separately to the main unit.

Only problem is the thread on the neck that you need to undo to change tips is dodgy but that may only be this specific one haha.

Great price. I think is you buy a reel of leaded or lead-free solder there is some flux already in it but good to buy some the liquid flux if you are doing desoldering work with the iron. You can get it in thicker sticky form as well if you intend of using hot air gun or PDR machine with surface mount components :-)
Edited by: "Sp00f" 3rd Oct 2014

CYPER

Can anyone tell me what else do I need for basic soldering apart from the … Can anyone tell me what else do I need for basic soldering apart from the station?Solder flux?I read that there is a thing that is flux + solder mixed.Anything else?Please advise. Thank you.



Yes all you would need is a roll of solder likethis.
You may want a solder sucker / solder braid to desolder things too

0scar222

how temperature control works ?

. The controller measures the resistance of the element during "off" cycles. The resistance of the element changes with temperature. As the element has little mass, it has little thermal inertia and quickly cools to the temperature of the bit during an "off" cycle. As it gets near the set temperature, the zero-crossing controller increases the number of "off" cycles, giving more time for the temperature to equalise and thus more accurate temperature measurement. It will get less accurate the larger the demand - but generally great temperature accuracy isn't needed when soldering big lumps of metal..

CYPER

Can anyone tell me what else do I need for basic soldering apart from the … Can anyone tell me what else do I need for basic soldering apart from the station?Solder flux?I read that there is a thing that is flux + solder mixed.Anything else?Please advise. Thank you.



First things kit wise I would recommend based on having been at it a while (I am not very good, don't do it often enough - but good enough to make a solid joint, they just are never that pretty!) doing repairs and auto electrics - can't beat a proper soldered joint versus insulation tape! I am by no means a professional, but still keep my hand in from when I did electronic engineering at college.

Depending on what you are soldering some finer tips can also come in handy. Standard ones are usually quite big for surface mount stuff - fine for older electronics or large format components, joining and tining wires etc
Something for solder removal - pump or desolder braid
A set of "helping hands" - basically a couple of crocodile clips on moveable arms, usually with a magnification lense on them. Absolute god send when you need to try and hold a component and your solder and the iron all at the same time, while trying not to brand yourself with the hot bit LOL.

Additional kit you may want - though not essential for starting IMO
Multimeter of some kind - doesn't have to be expensive as long as its accurate enough for the basics, but can come in damn handy if you are setting out to do a repair job on something for diagnositcs
Breadboard for prototyping circuits
Heatshrink and heatgun/lighter - the proper alternative to botch it insulation tape!

You don't need spend massive amounts to get started.

rdtorres

Yes all you would need is a roll of solder likethis.You may want a solder … Yes all you would need is a roll of solder likethis.You may want a solder sucker / solder braid to desolder things too



I'd avoid lead free solders if at all possible, for general soldering go for good old 60/40 or LMP with multicore rosin based flux

example (no idea if specific seller any good)

ebay.co.uk/itm…120

spamcan61

I'd avoid lead free solders if at all possible, for general soldering go … I'd avoid lead free solders if at all possible, for general soldering go for good old 60/40 or LMP with multicore rosin based fluxexample (no idea if specific seller any good)http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Solder-wire-tin-lead-60-40-fluxed-multi-core-100g-roll-board-Freepost-to-UK-/360941371680?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item5409c84120



Fair dos, only we have to use lead free at work.

bobbler

First things kit wise I would recommend based on having been at it a … First things kit wise I would recommend based on having been at it a while (I am not very good, don't do it often enough - but good enough to make a solid joint, they just are never that pretty!) doing repairs and auto electrics - can't beat a proper soldered joint versus insulation tape! I am by no means a professional, but still keep my hand in from when I did electronic engineering at college.Depending on what you are soldering some finer tips can also come in handy. Standard ones are usually quite big for surface mount stuff - fine for older electronics or large format components, joining and tining wires etcSomething for solder removal - pump or desolder braid A set of "helping hands" - basically a couple of crocodile clips on moveable arms, usually with a magnification lense on them. Absolute god send when you need to try and hold a component and your solder and the iron all at the same time, while trying not to brand yourself with the hot bit LOL.Additional kit you may want - though not essential for starting IMOMultimeter of some kind - doesn't have to be expensive as long as its accurate enough for the basics, but can come in damn handy if you are setting out to do a repair job on something for diagnositcs Breadboard for prototyping circuitsHeatshrink and heatgun/lighter - the proper alternative to botch it insulation tape!You don't need spend massive amounts to get started.



I got the helping hands and multimeter.

For example I want to try and fix this fan controller I have. The 3 pin connectors are playing = loose connection, so need to be re-soldered:

http://i.imgur.com/5NE3M4t.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/s7EBogH.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/6qixLzc.jpg

rdtorres

Yes all you would need is a roll of solder likethis.You may want a solder … Yes all you would need is a roll of solder likethis.You may want a solder sucker / solder braid to desolder things too



Just to add, whilst the solder above will be ideal for most soldering work, it can be quite expensive if a lot of solder is needed, eg stained glass leadwork. Then the solder used is normally just plain solder rods and the flux comes in tins. Some of those fluxes can be quite corrosive - but, in any event, it is better to remove flux residues from anything soldered, irrespective of whether the flux is labelled corrosive or not. Whilst this iron, at 60W and 450C will handle very small aluminium soldering jobs (with the right solder and flux) - 60W isn't enough for much greater thickness than coke cans.

This should sort my Christmas present for my old man, but could anyone tell me how is it different from this model:

uk.farnell.com/ten…392

Apart from EU plug obviously.


Does it accept some standard tips? I can't find any set of different shapes on their website, only 10-packs of same size..

Do you think this station is better than the Antex XS25?

Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, anything hotter could easily lift PCB tracks and overheat components. Does the temperature control help to keep the heat down? I need a new iron, but I'm not sure if 60W is too much.

CYPER

For example I want to try and fix this fan controller I have. The 3 pin … For example I want to try and fix this fan controller I have. The 3 pin connectors are playing = loose connection, so need to be re-soldered:



This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder fountain, during manufacture. The large metal pins didn't have time to heat to temperature and so the solder didn't rise through the plated through holes.

Heating the *bottom* pads with an iron should do the trick - there looks to be enough solder to wick up and push out any residue as it rises. I'd suggest to avoid heating the top pads directly. The thin connection traces are there and you run the risk of them lifting from the board and breaking.

If you feel that you need to add solder, I'd suggest first trying to add it via the bottom pad. Adding it to the top risks trapping contamination in the hole. If you do feel that adding solder to the top is the only way, I'd suggest that you still heat from the bottom.

Grrrrrrrrrrr

This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder … This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder fountain, during manufacture. The large metal pins didn't have time to heat to temperature and so the solder didn't rise through the plated through holes. Heating the *bottom* pads with an iron should do the trick - there looks to be enough solder to wick up and push out any residue as it rises. I'd suggest to avoid heating the top pads directly. The thin connection traces are there and you run the risk of them lifting from the board and breaking. If you feel that you need to add solder, I'd suggest first trying to add it via the bottom pad. Adding it to the top risks trapping contamination in the hole. If you do feel that adding solder to the top is the only way, I'd suggest that you still heat from the bottom.



Aren't the connection paths inside the board and not on the surface?

blackadr

Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, … Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, anything hotter could easily lift PCB tracks and overheat components. Does the temperature control help to keep the heat down? I need a new iron, but I'm not sure if 60W is too much.



Yeah you just manually select what heat you want to solder at in degrees.

blackadr

Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, … Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, anything hotter could easily lift PCB tracks and overheat components. Does the temperature control help to keep the heat down? I need a new iron, but I'm not sure if 60W is too much.



The Antex XS25 is a good iron, but I am not sure how it compares against this one.
Edited by: "CYPER" 3rd Oct 2014

Grrrrrrrrrrr

This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder … This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder fountain, during manufacture. The large metal pins didn't have time to heat to temperature and so the solder didn't rise through the plated through holes. Heating the *bottom* pads with an iron should do the trick - there looks to be enough solder to wick up and push out any residue as it rises. I'd suggest to avoid heating the top pads directly. The thin connection traces are there and you run the risk of them lifting from the board and breaking. If you feel that you need to add solder, I'd suggest first trying to add it via the bottom pad. Adding it to the top risks trapping contamination in the hole. If you do feel that adding solder to the top is the only way, I'd suggest that you still heat from the bottom.



Yes this should sort it.
Just heat the bottom and maybe add a bit extra solder if needed and it should rise through to other pads.

blackadr

Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, … Normally I would go for about 25W in a non-temperature controlled iron, anything hotter could easily lift PCB tracks and overheat components. Does the temperature control help to keep the heat down? I need a new iron, but I'm not sure if 60W is too much.

A 60W uncontrolled iron would be way too much for PCB work - but that isn't a problem when it's temperature controlled. The real problem is size - a tiny iron can be easier to use when only micro-miniature components are involved. But, for larger components, you really need the larger power output to solder effectively. a 25W iron trying to solder, say, the output wires of a PC power supply isn't going to make life easy. I use a 40W Weller plus a 120W soldering gun for "heavy metal".

rdtorres

Fair dos, only we have to use lead free at work.



Yeah same here, but I still find proper leaded solders better for domestic work.

CYPER

Aren't the connection paths inside the board and not on the surface?



They are unlikely to use a multilayer board for a fan controller - it will just be a (much cheaper) double-sided, plated-through hole type. A lot of the bottom will be "ground" track - and that will provide the "ground" connection for the fans. The other connections are the tracks on the top side.

I use a Weller WSD81 which is a cracking iron, but this should be a fantastic iron for the money! Might get one to save me swapping tips over and keep the Weller for sensitive stuff.
Edited by: "RustySpoons" 3rd Oct 2014

Voucher doesn't work: FEOCT10

The voucher entered is currently inactive and cannot be applied to your order.

CYPER

Voucher doesn't work: FEOCT10The voucher entered is currently inactive … Voucher doesn't work: FEOCT10The voucher entered is currently inactive and cannot be applied to your order.



Post is 22 hours old - so its expired according to the OP

Anyone has a working code then?

RustySpoons

I use a Weller WSD81 which is a cracking iron, but this should be a … I use a Weller WSD81 which is a cracking iron, but this should be a fantastic iron for the money! Might get one to save me swapping tips over and keep the Weller for sensitive stuff.



There has to be a song here Summer Nights - Greece I think

Weller, Weller, can you solder some more? Well it's a start hehe
Edited by: "fishmaster" 3rd Oct 2014

jonbyrne

I got one of these a couple of months ago, its great. Heats up very fast, … I got one of these a couple of months ago, its great. Heats up very fast, will take Hakko tips and comes with the backing of Farnell, Tenma is one of their brands.They are a rebadged, Atten which you can get off eBay for a few quid less normally, but you take your chances on the QC.Well worth the money.


Since the only thing different is the name how would the QC differ?

Grrrrrrrrrrr

This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder … This looks like the classic problem of too quick a pass across the solder fountain, during manufacture. The large metal pins didn't have time to heat to temperature and so the solder didn't rise through the plated through holes. Heating the *bottom* pads with an iron should do the trick - there looks to be enough solder to wick up and push out any residue as it rises. I'd suggest to avoid heating the top pads directly. The thin connection traces are there and you run the risk of them lifting from the board and breaking. If you feel that you need to add solder, I'd suggest first trying to add it via the bottom pad. Adding it to the top risks trapping contamination in the hole. If you do feel that adding solder to the top is the only way, I'd suggest that you still heat from the bottom.


Was about to say much the same thing. But no need now... lol

The iron is over £10 more at CPC but they sell the bits individually rather than in packs of 10. I missed the voucher on this but bought anyway as I'd been waiting for it to come down a bit at CPC for ages.

cpc.farnell.com/ten…820

Grrrrrrrrrrr

. The controller measures the resistance of the element during "off" … . The controller measures the resistance of the element during "off" cycles. The resistance of the element changes with temperature. As the element has little mass, it has little thermal inertia and quickly cools to the temperature of the bit during an "off" cycle. As it gets near the set temperature, the zero-crossing controller increases the number of "off" cycles, giving more time for the temperature to equalise and thus more accurate temperature measurement. It will get less accurate the larger the demand - but generally great temperature accuracy isn't needed when soldering big lumps of metal..



thanks for that wandered how it worked

cheers op. been looking to upgrade my little 18w antex for a while.

8% cashback with TCB

RustySpoons

I use a Weller WSD81 which is a cracking iron, but this should be a … I use a Weller WSD81 which is a cracking iron, but this should be a fantastic iron for the money! Might get one to save me swapping tips over and keep the Weller for sensitive stuff.

You won't make any mistake with Weller or Ersa but for occasionally use just too expensive.

I am actually considering to buy a Hakko FX888D-17BY but they are quite difficult to get in the UK.

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/ODY5WDE2MDA=/z/31QAAMXQ855RqLjB/$T2eC16J,!)8E9s4l5-79BRqLjBWSLg~~60_57.JPG

F2OCT10 works today

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/7566945/solder.JPG
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