8 Gang Surge Protected Mains Extension Tower with USB - 2 m Lead - Black or White for £8.40 & free delivery @ CPC
584°Expired

8 Gang Surge Protected Mains Extension Tower with USB - 2 m Lead - Black or White for £8.40 & free delivery @ CPC

26
Found 9th Dec 2017
Please use the following link to access white colour:

cpc.farnell.com/pro…rch


Product Overview

  • 2x USB charging ports
  • LED Power and surge indicators
  • Detachable base
  • Rated at 13A, 250V AC
  • USB ports rated at 2.4A, 5V
  • BS1363/A and BS5733/A Compliant

Product Information

  • No. of Outlets: 8
  • Outlets Outlet Type: UK
  • Current Rating: 13A
  • Supply Voltage V AC: 250V
  • Plug Type: UK
  • Cable Length: 2m
  • Product Range: Pro-Elec Mains Extensions
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26 Comments
Can members of the public order from these, please?
Jimbobery19719 m ago

Can members of the public order from these, please?


yes, no problem at all, their sister company Farnell tends to be aimed more at businesses
Edited by: "spannerzone" 9th Dec 2017
Jimbobery19718 m ago

Can members of the public order from these, please?


Yep.
Thanks for replies. Thanks to op
Edited by: "Jimbobery1971" 9th Dec 2017
I bought five of their USB/plug strips a while ago thinking they were a great deal. Using the cable that came with my iPhone, the most I could get out of one USB socket with nothing else plugged in was 1.1A.

Complete rip off, they made a bunch of excuses which were all ****** and eventually agreed to take them back.
Edited by moderator: "removed swear word" 9th Dec 2017
jeeeeeez22 m ago

I bought five of their USB/plug strips a while ago thinking they were a …I bought five of their USB/plug strips a while ago thinking they were a great deal. Using the cable that came with my iPhone, the most I could get out of one USB socket with nothing else plugged in was 1.1A.Complete rip off, they made a bunch of excuses which were all ****** and eventually agreed to take them back.



Yes but they were lovely and collected items for me
also it's obvious power from one socket is divided to 8 or an eight of power
Edited by: "7day" 9th Dec 2017
7day1 h, 34 m ago

Yes but they were lovely and collected items for mealso it's obvious power …Yes but they were lovely and collected items for mealso it's obvious power from one socket is divided to 8 or an eight of power



The number of mains sockets is irrelevant. There are two USB sockets.
jeeeeeez1 h, 50 m ago

I bought five of their USB/plug strips a while ago thinking they were a …I bought five of their USB/plug strips a while ago thinking they were a great deal. Using the cable that came with my iPhone, the most I could get out of one USB socket with nothing else plugged in was 1.1A.Complete rip off, they made a bunch of excuses which were all ****** and eventually agreed to take them back.



Probably because they are not "smart" sockets, so whatever you plug into them won't draw as much current as it might have done had it thought that they were capable of supplying more.
Anyone know the approximate height? The spec sheet lists everything but dimensions.
Thanks ordered
ashahid7940 m ago

10 way from CPC for …10 way from CPC for £6.72http://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/s10wttb/extension-tower-surge-10-gang/dp/PL15653


Yes, but without USB
pibpob16 h, 40 m ago

Probably because they are not "smart" sockets, so whatever you plug into …Probably because they are not "smart" sockets, so whatever you plug into them won't draw as much current as it might have done had it thought that they were capable of supplying more.



It seems to be quite complicated.
AFAICT to be smart a USB power supply has to be capable of supplying various currents and even higher voltages over USB. But it's the thing it supplies which recognises that it can accept those higher currents/and or voltages. And it is supplier and device specific, so the charger may not be allowed to supply higher power to your device. Also with smart Power Delivery, a USB hub will vary the amount of power (from zero to the maximum it can supply) So it seems there is some luck in whether your device will be able to drawn more than the minimum 500 ma per port and it's probably wise (for CPC) that CPC don't anywhere mention that their supply is 'smart' as there is no fixed standard for smart.
USB ports rated at 2.4A, 5V simply means the maximum current the charger could supply
Edited by: "jasee" 10th Dec 2017
jasee50 m ago

It seems to be quite complicated. AFAICT to be smart a USB power supply …It seems to be quite complicated. AFAICT to be smart a USB power supply has to be capable of supplying various currents and even higher voltages over USB. But it's the thing it supplies which recognises that it can accept those higher currents/and or voltages. And it is supplier and device specific, so the charger may not be allowed to supply higher power to your device. Also with smart Power Delivery, a USB hub will vary the amount of power (from zero to the maximum it can supply) So it seems there is some luck in whether your device will be able to drawn more than the minimum 500 ma per port and it's probably wise (for CPC) that CPC don't anywhere mention that their supply is 'smart' as there is no fixed standard for smart.USB ports rated at 2.4A, 5V simply means the maximum current the charger could supply


Largely correct but it depends on the Smart Charge technology in it. USB is rated for 5V at 500mA or 900mA for USB3. Anything else is technically beyond spec. Samsung AFC has a 9V rail as well as a 5V one at 2A.

Personally I don’t like USB ports built in to wall sockets and strips - you don’t know what it actually is rated to. I’d rather buy a 10 way tower and plug two good quality USB plugs in than an 8 way with 2 generic USB ports. Maybe that’s just me - it’s messier but at least I know it’ll work the way I want
plewis0012 m ago

Largely correct but it depends on the Smart Charge technology in it. USB …Largely correct but it depends on the Smart Charge technology in it. USB is rated for 5V at 500mA or 900mA for USB3. Anything else is technically beyond spec. Samsung AFC has a 9V rail as well as a 5V one at 2A.Personally I don’t like USB ports built in to wall sockets and strips - you don’t know what it actually is rated to. I’d rather buy a 10 way tower and plug two good quality USB plugs in than an 8 way with 2 generic USB ports. Maybe that’s just me - it’s messier but at least I know it’ll work the way I want


I said it depends on the technology in the charger AND on the technology in the device.
The amount it can supply it clear. What it WILL supply is not
The smart technology in quite established and defined here (as regards power supply) Not technically beyond specs

usb.org/dev…cs/

I use one of these types to see the actual voltage and power supplied

ebay.co.uk/itm…508
jasee55 m ago

I said it depends on the technology in the charger AND on the technology …I said it depends on the technology in the charger AND on the technology in the device. The amount it can supply it clear. What it WILL supply is notThe smart technology in quite established and defined here (as regards power supply) Not technically beyond specshttp://www.usb.org/developers/docs/devclass_docs/I use one of these types to see the actual voltage and power suppliedhttps://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/USB-Charger-Doctor-Voltage-Current-Meter-Mobile-Battery-Tester-Power-Detector-M/322591909508?


I only quoted what a 'USB port' can supply as that's the absolute basic amount I would expect and yes, I imagine the chargers built into these strips are at the low-end.
plewis0052 m ago

I only quoted what a 'USB port' can supply as that's the absolute basic …I only quoted what a 'USB port' can supply as that's the absolute basic amount I would expect and yes, I imagine the chargers built into these strips are at the low-end.



Then I don't see your point. Of course it should be able to supply the minimum.

Maybe you mean that they aren't well enough constructed? Lots cheap USB chargers aren't and just consist of simple circuits and may have no overload protection (see youtube)
ashahid7917 h, 49 m ago

10 way from CPC for …10 way from CPC for £6.72http://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/s10wttb/extension-tower-surge-10-gang/dp/PL15653



I have some of those - they are very good and very stable.
jasee3 h, 43 m ago

It seems to be quite complicated. AFAICT to be smart a USB power supply …It seems to be quite complicated. AFAICT to be smart a USB power supply has to be capable of supplying various currents and even higher voltages over USB. But it's the thing it supplies which recognises that it can accept those higher currents/and or voltages. And it is supplier and device specific, so the charger may not be allowed to supply higher power to your device. Also with smart Power Delivery, a USB hub will vary the amount of power (from zero to the maximum it can supply) So it seems there is some luck in whether your device will be able to drawn more than the minimum 500 ma per port and it's probably wise (for CPC) that CPC don't anywhere mention that their supply is 'smart' as there is no fixed standard for smart.USB ports rated at 2.4A, 5V simply means the maximum current the charger could supply


Any constant voltage power supply will supply any current required, up to its maximum rating. What happens is that the connected devices (not the charger) try to determine the maximum rating of the charger in order not to overload it, by various non-standard configurations of resistors or whatever that the charger connects to the data pins. When you use a charger designed for a specific device, the device will look at what's on the data pins of the connection and see something which tells it that it can draw a certain amount of power without damaging the charger. If you use a different charger it may be quite capable of supplying the same amount of current, but the device will see the data pins configured differently so it will only draw the lowest common denominator.

A "smart" USB socket has a chip which monitors the current being drawn, and has outputs connected to the data pins which can simulate various different manufacturers' configurations. When you plug in a device, it will try these different configurations, all the while monitoring the current drawn, and will settle on the one which gives the highest current.

If there had been a common standard, then none of this chicanery would be required - there would be a simple resistor whose value corresponded to the current rating of the charger.

Different voltages are indeed also a factor. I know that certain Samsung devices will draw more current if they see 5.3V rather than 5V.
Edited by: "pibpob" 10th Dec 2017
pibpob11 m ago

Any constant voltage power supply will supply any current required, up to …Any constant voltage power supply will supply any current required, up to its maximum rating. What happens is that the connected devices (not the charger) try to determine the maximum rating of the charger in order not to overload it, by various non-standard configurations of resistors or whatever that the charger connects to the data pins. When you use a charger designed for a specific device, the device will look at what's on the data pins of the connection and see something which tells it that it can draw a certain amount of power without damaging the charger. If you use a different charger it may be quite capable of supplying the same amount of current, but the device will see the data pins configured differently so it will only draw the lowest common denominator.A "smart" USB socket has a chip which monitors the current being drawn, and has outputs connected to the data pins which can simulate various different manufacturers' configurations. When you plug in a device, it will try these different configurations, all the while monitoring the current drawn, and will settle on the one which gives the highest current.If there had been a common standard, then none of this chicanery would be required - there would be a simple resistor whose value corresponded to the current rating of the charger.Different voltages are indeed also a factor. I know that certain Samsung devices will draw more current if they see 5.3V rather than 5V.



I know all this thanks.
The pretext is/was that unless the charger is manufactured by the phone etc, then it may damage it. This pretext is used for printers, rechargable batteries etc.
Maybe a 'chemelion' charger could be made!
jasee1 h, 5 m ago

Then I don't see your point. Of course it should be able to supply the …Then I don't see your point. Of course it should be able to supply the minimum. Maybe you mean that they aren't well enough constructed? Lots cheap USB chargers aren't and just consist of simple circuits and may have no overload protection (see youtube)


Actually I think we do agree? I would expect a power strip with built in USB to supply the most basic power at least - which is 500mA and also chronically slow so the only way round that is to use a decent separate charger. I see ‘built in USB’ as a convenience only, and don’t expect much more but that’s why I wouldn’t.

I wouldn’t touch a cheap charger any more after some of the stuff I’ve seen - branded seems generally safe.
jasee33 m ago

I know all this thanks.The pretext is/was that unless the charger is …I know all this thanks.The pretext is/was that unless the charger is manufactured by the phone etc, then it may damage it. This pretext is used for printers, rechargable batteries etc.Maybe a 'chemelion' charger could be made!



OK, but the power supply does not vary the current it supples to the device; the device varies the current it draws.

No power supply would be capable of providing less than 500mA, so I would suggest that it would never be damaged by a compliant device being connected, regardless of manufacturer. That is, one which does not draw more than 500mA unless it senses the right configuration of the data pins.
pibpob
'OK, but the power supply does not vary the current it supples to the device; the device varies the current it draws.'

I know I said that
I tried about 5 different devices with a wide variety of cables (I wasn't going to half-ass it after going to the trouble of buying a USB volt/ammeter) and 1.1A was the most it would deliver. With my little USB speaker it was delivering 0.3A.


I have learned more here than I did reading CPC's crappy explanation but in my mind it does not excuse the fact that I have a load of chargers that claim to deliver 2.0A and successfully do so, while this one claimed it and was consistently delivering half of any of my other chargers.


At least with my other cheap chargers they deliver 1A for everything instead of half of the maximum possible draw.
I totally dislike CPC. They summoned me to court after I returned a faulty item and after I stood up to them and declared myself NOT GUILTY they immediately cancelled their case. I did nothing wrong yet they chose to attempt to prosecute me. Beware! Buy elsewhere!
GrahamWigan10th Dec

I totally dislike CPC. They summoned me to court after I returned a faulty …I totally dislike CPC. They summoned me to court after I returned a faulty item and after I stood up to them and declared myself NOT GUILTY they immediately cancelled their case. I did nothing wrong yet they chose to attempt to prosecute me. Beware! Buy elsewhere!


Hi Graham, i fear that you have made that sound a lot more interesting than the reality...

We do send out legal letters where we have an aged balance against an account - if you have returned a faulty item to us we would normally raise a credit to offset the balance, now the timing of this may have meant you have had a letter (not having the order details to hand its difficult to say exactly why you have had the letter).
You will have called us to advise what has happened (faulty return) in which case we will have removed this from the account.

The way you write this suggests we have actually had a date in court where you have had the opportunity to proclaim your innocence..

Sorry, but that is misleading as it is simply not the case.

We are sorry you have had a poor experience and while its OK to share that experience you need to be fair with what has actually happened.

Kind regards
The CPC Team.
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