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8 x AA 2000mAh GP ReCyKo Pro Rechargeable NI-MH 2000 mAh Batteries - £12.75 delivered @ jlsbatteries eBay
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8 x AA 2000mAh GP ReCyKo Pro Rechargeable NI-MH 2000 mAh Batteries - £12.75 delivered @ jlsbatteries eBay

£12.75eBay Deals
Expert (Beta)12
Expert (Beta)
Posted 30th Jan

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Great Brand....2000mAh Batteries ...

Nickel Metal Hydride - NI-MH

CAPACITY: 2000mAh

ALWAYS READY TECHNOLOGY

Fast charge capability

No memory effect

Up to 1000 recharge cycles

Excellent High drain performance

Charge using any AA NiMH AA Charger

(supplied loose from bulk boxes)

These batteries can replace any standard AA batteries.

GP's NiMH rechargeable batteries are especially designed to meet the most stringent needs of today's high drain applications such as Digital Cameras (exceeded 3 times more shots and longer-lasting than normal alkaline batteries), MD & MP3 players and other portable devices.

Suitable for cordless phones and any other application were you can use normal AA batteries.
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RickyWong30/01/2020 16:11

Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics …Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics will see this having low battery as soon as the battery is around 80%...


This explains about 1.2 V which is usually the case for all rechargeable batteries...

Source

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE IN VOLTAGE BETWEEN RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES AND SINGLE-USE BATTERIES?
Standard size single-use batteries usually have a nominal voltage of 1.5 volts whilst rechargeable batteries are 1.2 volts. The exception being PP3 9 volt block size battery, and some specialist security batteries, which can be higher depending on the size and type of battery.

As single-use batteries are consumed, the voltage reduces. So throughout the time the batteries are used, single-use batteries’ average output is 1.2 volts, similar to that of rechargeable NiMH batteries. The major difference is that single-use batteries output 1.5 volts when first used and end below 1.0 volts, whilst rechargeable NiMH batteries maintain an average of 1.2 volts for most of the time.

This means that in the vast majority of devices the voltage should not be an issue when replacing single-use batteries with rechargeable batteries. However there are some exceptions where the difference in voltage can cause poor performance. For example when using four or six batteries in series in some brands of DAB radio, the voltage difference between four alkaline batteries (4 x 1.5 volt = 6 volt total) and four rechargeable NiMH batteries (4 x 1.2 volt = 4.8 volt total) can lead to shorter battery lifespan. However there would be no detrimental effect on the radio, and the majority of DAB radios will work well using rechargeable batteries without any problems.
12 Comments
Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics will see this having low battery as soon as the battery is around 80%...
RickyWong30/01/2020 16:11

Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics …Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics will see this having low battery as soon as the battery is around 80%...


This explains about 1.2 V which is usually the case for all rechargeable batteries...

Source

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE IN VOLTAGE BETWEEN RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES AND SINGLE-USE BATTERIES?
Standard size single-use batteries usually have a nominal voltage of 1.5 volts whilst rechargeable batteries are 1.2 volts. The exception being PP3 9 volt block size battery, and some specialist security batteries, which can be higher depending on the size and type of battery.

As single-use batteries are consumed, the voltage reduces. So throughout the time the batteries are used, single-use batteries’ average output is 1.2 volts, similar to that of rechargeable NiMH batteries. The major difference is that single-use batteries output 1.5 volts when first used and end below 1.0 volts, whilst rechargeable NiMH batteries maintain an average of 1.2 volts for most of the time.

This means that in the vast majority of devices the voltage should not be an issue when replacing single-use batteries with rechargeable batteries. However there are some exceptions where the difference in voltage can cause poor performance. For example when using four or six batteries in series in some brands of DAB radio, the voltage difference between four alkaline batteries (4 x 1.5 volt = 6 volt total) and four rechargeable NiMH batteries (4 x 1.2 volt = 4.8 volt total) can lead to shorter battery lifespan. However there would be no detrimental effect on the radio, and the majority of DAB radios will work well using rechargeable batteries without any problems.
Don’t get me wrong. These batteries are cheap for what they are. All my remote controls for TV, DAB, childs toys have Eneloop which are similar to these. They last a long time and never have to worry about battery running out. 700mA charger charges the battery to full in 2Hr as the batteries are never 100% depleted. But I have also used these in camera grips. They don’t last as long as I hoped. It is purely because in camera grip they are connected and there are 6 of them. I think it is a combination of series and parallel. Basically they don’t hit the voltage required by a margin. When full they are fine but soon as after a few clicks the grip will report battery low. Anyway if you got a point and shoot battery that only requires 2 batteries then it maybe ok.
My go to rechargeable batteries. Imo the best, I have tried various others.
apur3230/01/2020 16:33

This explains about 1.2 V which is usually the case for all rechargeable …This explains about 1.2 V which is usually the case for all rechargeable batteries...SourceWHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE IN VOLTAGE BETWEEN RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES AND SINGLE-USE BATTERIES?Standard size single-use batteries usually have a nominal voltage of 1.5 volts whilst rechargeable batteries are 1.2 volts. The exception being PP3 9 volt block size battery, and some specialist security batteries, which can be higher depending on the size and type of battery.As single-use batteries are consumed, the voltage reduces. So throughout the time the batteries are used, single-use batteries’ average output is 1.2 volts, similar to that of rechargeable NiMH batteries. The major difference is that single-use batteries output 1.5 volts when first used and end below 1.0 volts, whilst rechargeable NiMH batteries maintain an average of 1.2 volts for most of the time.This means that in the vast majority of devices the voltage should not be an issue when replacing single-use batteries with rechargeable batteries. However there are some exceptions where the difference in voltage can cause poor performance. For example when using four or six batteries in series in some brands of DAB radio, the voltage difference between four alkaline batteries (4 x 1.5 volt = 6 volt total) and four rechargeable NiMH batteries (4 x 1.2 volt = 4.8 volt total) can lead to shorter battery lifespan. However there would be no detrimental effect on the radio, and the majority of DAB radios will work well using rechargeable batteries without any problems.


Interesting. Never knew any of that.

So would you recommend these for game controllers? Or should we wait for the next Tronic offer at Lidl?
Decent charger for these?
Cold from me. It's £5.50 for 4x Ikea's Ladda batteries, which are spec'd at 2450mAh at their standard rate, and this falls pretty far south of that benchmark.
RickyWong30/01/2020 16:11

Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics …Nominal voltage is only 1.2V. That means almost all of the electronics will see this having low battery as soon as the battery is around 80%...


Not true. These are stable at 1.2V for long time which is pretty much the same like 1.5V standard battery. The 1.5V drops quickly to arround 1.2 V anyway. Most devices are absolutely fine with 1.2V rechargables
Pájaro30/01/2020 22:57

Cold from me. It's £5.50 for 4x Ikea's Ladda batteries, which are spec'd …Cold from me. It's £5.50 for 4x Ikea's Ladda batteries, which are spec'd at 2450mAh at their standard rate, and this falls pretty far south of that benchmark.


Have you tested them under load?
Damian6631/01/2020 02:29

Have you tested them under load?


Whats a good way to do such a test?
Damian6631/01/2020 02:29

Have you tested them under load?


Used, but not exactly tested. Why?
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