Unfortunately, this deal is no longer valid
9 Free Udemy Course : The Complete Python 3, The Complete Ethical Hacking, Complete Full-Stack JavaScript, Front-End Web Development
1168° Expired

9 Free Udemy Course : The Complete Python 3, The Complete Ethical Hacking, Complete Full-Stack JavaScript, Front-End Web Development

FREE£0.01Udemy Deals
23
Refreshed 15th Sep 2019 (Posted 14th Sep 2019)

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Community Updates
If you click through or buy, retailers may pay hotukdeals some money, but this never affects which deals get posted. Find more info in our FAQs and About Us page.

Groups

Top comments
Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say coursera, edx, lynda and so on, it's a marketplace for content creators-anyone can create a course, although it's 'audited' that's about meeting style requirement, not content. Price it up how you want, get f+f to review it and off you go.
Obviously there's a lot of decent stuff there which tends to rise to the top, but (apologies, op) the stuff with outrageous pricing and discounts, and the freebies, are creators trying to game the rankings.
Check out the negative reviews for these courses (all the courses were created by the same guy) and you'll see a common thread of someone who doesn't really know what he's talking about.


On the other hand the training is free... but my advice would be there's better resources for free training around.
Learning modern programming - edx's CS50 is a great example of online teaching, but a big course - Coursera has a lot of really great stuff, nearly all of it free, but they really obscure the free link to encourage you down the paid-for route (google coursera audit for an explanation)


Sorry op, not trying to p*** on your chips, this is a bit of a bugbear of mine..
Edited by: "oobie38" 14th Sep 2019
oobie3814/09/2019 20:22

Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say …Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say coursera, edx, lynda and so on, it's a marketplace for content creators-anyone can create a course, although it's 'audited' that's about meeting style requirement, not content. Price it up how you want, get f+f to review it and off you go. Obviously there's a lot of decent stuff there which tends to rise to the top, but (apologies, op) the stuff with outrageous pricing and discounts, and the freebies, are creators trying to game the rankings.Check out the negative reviews for these courses (all the courses were created by the same guy) and you'll see a common thread of someone who doesn't really know what he's talking about.On the other hand the training is free... but my advice would be there's better resources for free training around. Learning modern programming - edx's CS50 is a great example of online teaching, but a big course - Coursera has a lot of really great stuff, nearly all of it free, but they really obscure the free link to encourage you down the paid-for route (google coursera audit for an explanation)Sorry op, not trying to p*** on your chips, this is a bit of a bugbear of mine..


I have quite a lot of experience with Udemy, essentially what you say is true but here's the BUT again, there's some absolutely stellar courses on Udemy as well. Learn Linux in 11.5 hours is completely outstanding, I did that course a year ago, the instructor is just fantastic, the enthusiasm amazing and the quality of instruction incredible. I'm also doing the Brad Traversy Modern HTML and CSS course, which so far is awesome.

I added 3 of these courses as I'll skip through what I already know and use them for projects. I'll soon get a feel if they're crap or not.

I recommend if you're in to Web Dev to follow a well structured course, so if you prefer video instruction and the option to pay for mentorship at a very very reasonable rate then Open App Academy is excellent and FREE unless you choose the mentorship option at $29 a month, which is insanely cheap. I swapped to the The Odin Project because I soon realised you need to know how to setup a web development environment and learn GIT. FreeCodeCamp is the weakest, I started it a couple of years ago and it was just theory, theory, theory, I didn't even get to the projects, there's some good elements to it.

I would cherry pick what you need from all of the above, the React tuition from Open App Academy is first rate.

Then if you manage to complete most of those tracks or enough of them to feel a bit dandy, then move on to The University of Helsinki's Full Stack Open which will push you much further > fullstackopen.com/en/

Last and not least, if you want to learn quicker then learn how to use Anki and start making flash cards of everything you need to remember, it will increase your productivity hugely. There's some good blogs about using Anki for programming and Derek Banas on YouTube has a great video about how to use it.

Open App Academy (FREE, optional mentorship at insanely low price of $29 a month>

open.appacademy.io/

The Odin Project (FREE, best resource for getting you setup and has a great Discord for help >

theodinproject.com/

FreeCodeCamp (FREE, has a great community) >

freecodecamp.org/

Also everyone tells you to learn Javascript for Web Dev, they're not wrong, however Open App Academy and The Odin Project teach Ruby first before Javascript, if you're a beginner I was at the start of the year, you'll appreciate just how clean Ruby is compared to Javascript. What you absolutely must get in to your head is that the language is the tool, learning the syntax etc don't go crazy on it, that's why devdocs.io/ exists, learn to program, learn the logic of programming, yes you need the right tools for the job, but don't think the language makes a programmer, it doesn't what makes a programmer is being able to break down a task in to smaller elements and work through them.

Last of all there's a vast amount of technologies with Web Dev, get the fundamentals down which is HTML easy to learn, but make sure you can cater for responsive web design and use semantic tags, header, main, section, aside, footer to structure the page, then learn CSS, I know of what I think is a decent CSS curriculum by IMM9o > dev.to/imm…ec2 and also available on GitHub > github.com/IMM…lum

I'm working through that curriculum so I become a CSS master (that's the hope, we'll see).

I have used all my available quota of easy words today, so that's me done for the day. Enjoy my links and don't give up. Programming is difficult even for seasoned pros, just learn the logic of programming. I'm sure some people can suggest links for that, but maybe this post is already becoming an industry of overwhelming information. Good luck people, you don't stop learning after you leave school, that's a myth for the lazy.

OH YES > Absolute respect going out to The MartianMan, heavyweight contender of the world of the de facto best Udemy links. Appreciating the free nature of your work good Sir. May you be justly rewarded in your future endeavours. Definitely out of words now. Peace to you all, and get to work!
Edited by: "fishmaster" 15th Sep 2019
That awkward moment when you see a new udemy bunch and realise you already registered for all of those in the past.... What am I doing with my life.....
Thanks Op! Tried to grab them but apparently I already have them lol, must try and look at some now 😁
23 Comments
Thanks Op! Tried to grab them but apparently I already have them lol, must try and look at some now 😁
That awkward moment when you see a new udemy bunch and realise you already registered for all of those in the past.... What am I doing with my life.....
Heat. Some good courses here
Is anyone good with termux
Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say coursera, edx, lynda and so on, it's a marketplace for content creators-anyone can create a course, although it's 'audited' that's about meeting style requirement, not content. Price it up how you want, get f+f to review it and off you go.
Obviously there's a lot of decent stuff there which tends to rise to the top, but (apologies, op) the stuff with outrageous pricing and discounts, and the freebies, are creators trying to game the rankings.
Check out the negative reviews for these courses (all the courses were created by the same guy) and you'll see a common thread of someone who doesn't really know what he's talking about.


On the other hand the training is free... but my advice would be there's better resources for free training around.
Learning modern programming - edx's CS50 is a great example of online teaching, but a big course - Coursera has a lot of really great stuff, nearly all of it free, but they really obscure the free link to encourage you down the paid-for route (google coursera audit for an explanation)


Sorry op, not trying to p*** on your chips, this is a bit of a bugbear of mine..
Edited by: "oobie38" 14th Sep 2019
Voted hot
oobie3814/09/2019 20:22

Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say …Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say coursera, edx, lynda and so on, it's a marketplace for content creators-anyone can create a course, although it's 'audited' that's about meeting style requirement, not content. Price it up how you want, get f+f to review it and off you go. Obviously there's a lot of decent stuff there which tends to rise to the top, but (apologies, op) the stuff with outrageous pricing and discounts, and the freebies, are creators trying to game the rankings.Check out the negative reviews for these courses (all the courses were created by the same guy) and you'll see a common thread of someone who doesn't really know what he's talking about.On the other hand the training is free... but my advice would be there's better resources for free training around. Learning modern programming - edx's CS50 is a great example of online teaching, but a big course - Coursera has a lot of really great stuff, nearly all of it free, but they really obscure the free link to encourage you down the paid-for route (google coursera audit for an explanation)Sorry op, not trying to p*** on your chips, this is a bit of a bugbear of mine..


I have quite a lot of experience with Udemy, essentially what you say is true but here's the BUT again, there's some absolutely stellar courses on Udemy as well. Learn Linux in 11.5 hours is completely outstanding, I did that course a year ago, the instructor is just fantastic, the enthusiasm amazing and the quality of instruction incredible. I'm also doing the Brad Traversy Modern HTML and CSS course, which so far is awesome.

I added 3 of these courses as I'll skip through what I already know and use them for projects. I'll soon get a feel if they're crap or not.

I recommend if you're in to Web Dev to follow a well structured course, so if you prefer video instruction and the option to pay for mentorship at a very very reasonable rate then Open App Academy is excellent and FREE unless you choose the mentorship option at $29 a month, which is insanely cheap. I swapped to the The Odin Project because I soon realised you need to know how to setup a web development environment and learn GIT. FreeCodeCamp is the weakest, I started it a couple of years ago and it was just theory, theory, theory, I didn't even get to the projects, there's some good elements to it.

I would cherry pick what you need from all of the above, the React tuition from Open App Academy is first rate.

Then if you manage to complete most of those tracks or enough of them to feel a bit dandy, then move on to The University of Helsinki's Full Stack Open which will push you much further > fullstackopen.com/en/

Last and not least, if you want to learn quicker then learn how to use Anki and start making flash cards of everything you need to remember, it will increase your productivity hugely. There's some good blogs about using Anki for programming and Derek Banas on YouTube has a great video about how to use it.

Open App Academy (FREE, optional mentorship at insanely low price of $29 a month>

open.appacademy.io/

The Odin Project (FREE, best resource for getting you setup and has a great Discord for help >

theodinproject.com/

FreeCodeCamp (FREE, has a great community) >

freecodecamp.org/

Also everyone tells you to learn Javascript for Web Dev, they're not wrong, however Open App Academy and The Odin Project teach Ruby first before Javascript, if you're a beginner I was at the start of the year, you'll appreciate just how clean Ruby is compared to Javascript. What you absolutely must get in to your head is that the language is the tool, learning the syntax etc don't go crazy on it, that's why devdocs.io/ exists, learn to program, learn the logic of programming, yes you need the right tools for the job, but don't think the language makes a programmer, it doesn't what makes a programmer is being able to break down a task in to smaller elements and work through them.

Last of all there's a vast amount of technologies with Web Dev, get the fundamentals down which is HTML easy to learn, but make sure you can cater for responsive web design and use semantic tags, header, main, section, aside, footer to structure the page, then learn CSS, I know of what I think is a decent CSS curriculum by IMM9o > dev.to/imm…ec2 and also available on GitHub > github.com/IMM…lum

I'm working through that curriculum so I become a CSS master (that's the hope, we'll see).

I have used all my available quota of easy words today, so that's me done for the day. Enjoy my links and don't give up. Programming is difficult even for seasoned pros, just learn the logic of programming. I'm sure some people can suggest links for that, but maybe this post is already becoming an industry of overwhelming information. Good luck people, you don't stop learning after you leave school, that's a myth for the lazy.

OH YES > Absolute respect going out to The MartianMan, heavyweight contender of the world of the de facto best Udemy links. Appreciating the free nature of your work good Sir. May you be justly rewarded in your future endeavours. Definitely out of words now. Peace to you all, and get to work!
Edited by: "fishmaster" 15th Sep 2019
I've managed to learn Android (Java) after a few attemps but it was only after I took a free course on Udacity did I actually geddit. My problem wasn't loops and variables, my problem was linking Xml to variables which takes 3 steps. Once I learned how to link a Button to an EditText everything fell into place. Things like OOP is a really difficult topic to get your head around but I only learned it when I needed to sort an Object by a date. It took me 2 solid weeks of Googling to solve the issue but I solved it in the end. I've done the same with Sqlite, Json, Firebase and a host of other things that help me create apps.

My point is once you get your head around the basics, everything else is a Google/ StackOverFlow search. I've signed up for a few of these courses but it's highly unlikely I'll ever take them. My skills in Android would probably mean any other language would come easy if I needed them.

Udacity keep changing the way the site works and they try and push you onto the paid stuff but the course I took was free. I can thoughroughly recommend their Android Basics.
oobie3814/09/2019 20:22

Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say …Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say coursera, edx, lynda and so on, it's a marketplace for content creators-anyone can create a course, although it's 'audited' that's about meeting style requirement, not content. Price it up how you want, get f+f to review it and off you go. Obviously there's a lot of decent stuff there which tends to rise to the top, but (apologies, op) the stuff with outrageous pricing and discounts, and the freebies, are creators trying to game the rankings.Check out the negative reviews for these courses (all the courses were created by the same guy) and you'll see a common thread of someone who doesn't really know what he's talking about.On the other hand the training is free... but my advice would be there's better resources for free training around. Learning modern programming - edx's CS50 is a great example of online teaching, but a big course - Coursera has a lot of really great stuff, nearly all of it free, but they really obscure the free link to encourage you down the paid-for route (google coursera audit for an explanation)Sorry op, not trying to p*** on your chips, this is a bit of a bugbear of mine..


Can you link to any free Data science course on coursera? Thanks
Edited by: "Kindsaver" 15th Sep 2019
Great find. Thanks
Kindsaver15/09/2019 16:15

Can you link to any free Data science course on coursera? Thanks



coursera.org/spe…nce.


38467730-HZnbi.jpg

Select "Courses"
This pulls up a brief synopsis of each of the 10 courses that make up the specialization.
Select a course, then when the course page is shown, hit the 'Enrol for free button.
Then, in the popup, don't select the free trial, select the "Audit' in the small print down the bottom.
Repeat for each course you want.


38467730-sfgqS.jpg
Obviously there are limitations- like you can't submit work for grading etc.

Hope that helps somebody...
fishmaster15/09/2019 13:27

I have quite a lot of experience with Udemy, essentially what you say is …I have quite a lot of experience with Udemy, essentially what you say is true but here's the BUT again, there's some absolutely stellar courses on Udemy as well. Learn Linux in 11.5 hours is completely outstanding, I did that course a year ago, the instructor is just fantastic, the enthusiasm amazing and the quality of instruction incredible. I'm also doing the Brad Traversy Modern HTML and CSS course, which so far is awesome. I added 3 of these courses as I'll skip through what I already know and use them for projects. I'll soon get a feel if they're crap or not. I recommend if you're in to Web Dev to follow a well structured course, so if you prefer video instruction and the option to pay for mentorship at a very very reasonable rate then Open App Academy is excellent and FREE unless you choose the mentorship option at $29 a month, which is insanely cheap. I swapped to the The Odin Project because I soon realised you need to know how to setup a web development environment and learn GIT. FreeCodeCamp is the weakest, I started it a couple of years ago and it was just theory, theory, theory, I didn't even get to the projects, there's some good elements to it. I would cherry pick what you need from all of the above, the React tuition from Open App Academy is first rate. Then if you manage to complete most of those tracks or enough of them to feel a bit dandy, then move on to The University of Helsinki's Full Stack Open which will push you much further > https://fullstackopen.com/en/Last and not least, if you want to learn quicker then learn how to use Anki and start making flash cards of everything you need to remember, it will increase your productivity hugely. There's some good blogs about using Anki for programming and Derek Banas on YouTube has a great video about how to use it. Open App Academy (FREE, optional mentorship at insanely low price of $29 a month>https://open.appacademy.io/The Odin Project (FREE, best resource for getting you setup and has a great Discord for help >https://www.theodinproject.com/FreeCodeCamp (FREE, has a great community) >https://www.freecodecamp.org/Also everyone tells you to learn Javascript for Web Dev, they're not wrong, however Open App Academy and The Odin Project teach Ruby first before Javascript, if you're a beginner I was at the start of the year, you'll appreciate just how clean Ruby is compared to Javascript. What you absolutely must get in to your head is that the language is the tool, learning the syntax etc don't go crazy on it, that's why https://devdocs.io/ exists, learn to program, learn the logic of programming, yes you need the right tools for the job, but don't think the language makes a programmer, it doesn't what makes a programmer is being able to break down a task in to smaller elements and work through them. Last of all there's a vast amount of technologies with Web Dev, get the fundamentals down which is HTML easy to learn, but make sure you can cater for responsive web design and use semantic tags, header, main, section, aside, footer to structure the page, then learn CSS, I know of what I think is a decent CSS curriculum by IMM9o > https://dev.to/imm9o/i-built-my-own-css-curriculum-to-master-it-2ec2 and also available on GitHub > https://github.com/IMM9O/css-masterclass-curriculumI'm working through that curriculum so I become a CSS master (that's the hope, we'll see).I have used all my available quota of easy words today, so that's me done for the day. Enjoy my links and don't give up. Programming is difficult even for seasoned pros, just learn the logic of programming. I'm sure some people can suggest links for that, but maybe this post is already becoming an industry of overwhelming information. Good luck people, you don't stop learning after you leave school, that's a myth for the lazy.OH YES > Absolute respect going out to The MartianMan, heavyweight contender of the world of the de facto best Udemy links. Appreciating the free nature of your work good Sir. May you be justly rewarded in your future endeavours. Definitely out of words now. Peace to you all, and get to work!


Man! Thanks so much for the very detailed comment. You have no idea how much you have helped me today!!
Sean_diddy15/09/2019 20:36

Man! Thanks so much for the very detailed comment. You have no idea how …Man! Thanks so much for the very detailed comment. You have no idea how much you have helped me today!!


Glad to help.
Where do i enter the code, when i go to cart, it just asks to pay with G Pay?

Worked by clicking on the links above, second last one is dead
Edited by: "j1mgg" 15th Sep 2019
oobie3814/09/2019 20:22

Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say …Took me a while to realise that udemy isn't really about learning like say coursera, edx, lynda and so on, it's a marketplace for content creators-anyone can create a course, although it's 'audited' that's about meeting style requirement, not content. Price it up how you want, get f+f to review it and off you go. Obviously there's a lot of decent stuff there which tends to rise to the top, but (apologies, op) the stuff with outrageous pricing and discounts, and the freebies, are creators trying to game the rankings.Check out the negative reviews for these courses (all the courses were created by the same guy) and you'll see a common thread of someone who doesn't really know what he's talking about.On the other hand the training is free... but my advice would be there's better resources for free training around. Learning modern programming - edx's CS50 is a great example of online teaching, but a big course - Coursera has a lot of really great stuff, nearly all of it free, but they really obscure the free link to encourage you down the paid-for route (google coursera audit for an explanation)Sorry op, not trying to p*** on your chips, this is a bit of a bugbear of mine..


Agreed. Edx fan myself. Udemy has the odd good thing on it but for the most part it is junk.
Thanks heat
this one is meant to be good:

Linux for Absolute Beginners!

udemy.com/cou…in/
Think I got it for free off HotUKDeals at one point

it's also on the creator's (Joseph Delgadillo) own YouTube channel for free:
The Complete Linux Course: Beginner to Power User!
youtube.com/wat…Jak
7h23m / 1,720,119 views
Not a single course here that you've not posted before.
Thanks for the effort. Signed up
dealhunter525314/09/2019 18:02

That awkward moment when you see a new udemy bunch and realise you already …That awkward moment when you see a new udemy bunch and realise you already registered for all of those in the past.... What am I doing with my life.....



and by the time you get around to doing them, the course is obsolete
thewindburner16/09/2019 08:42

and by the time you get around to doing them, the course is obsolete


fishmaster15/09/2019 13:27

I have quite a lot of experience with Udemy, essentially what you say is …I have quite a lot of experience with Udemy, essentially what you say is true but here's the BUT again, there's some absolutely stellar courses on Udemy as well. Learn Linux in 11.5 hours is completely outstanding, I did that course a year ago, the instructor is just fantastic, the enthusiasm amazing and the quality of instruction incredible. I'm also doing the Brad Traversy Modern HTML and CSS course, which so far is awesome. I added 3 of these courses as I'll skip through what I already know and use them for projects. I'll soon get a feel if they're crap or not. I recommend if you're in to Web Dev to follow a well structured course, so if you prefer video instruction and the option to pay for mentorship at a very very reasonable rate then Open App Academy is excellent and FREE unless you choose the mentorship option at $29 a month, which is insanely cheap. I swapped to the The Odin Project because I soon realised you need to know how to setup a web development environment and learn GIT. FreeCodeCamp is the weakest, I started it a couple of years ago and it was just theory, theory, theory, I didn't even get to the projects, there's some good elements to it. I would cherry pick what you need from all of the above, the React tuition from Open App Academy is first rate. Then if you manage to complete most of those tracks or enough of them to feel a bit dandy, then move on to The University of Helsinki's Full Stack Open which will push you much further > https://fullstackopen.com/en/Last and not least, if you want to learn quicker then learn how to use Anki and start making flash cards of everything you need to remember, it will increase your productivity hugely. There's some good blogs about using Anki for programming and Derek Banas on YouTube has a great video about how to use it. Open App Academy (FREE, optional mentorship at insanely low price of $29 a month>https://open.appacademy.io/The Odin Project (FREE, best resource for getting you setup and has a great Discord for help >https://www.theodinproject.com/FreeCodeCamp (FREE, has a great community) >https://www.freecodecamp.org/Also everyone tells you to learn Javascript for Web Dev, they're not wrong, however Open App Academy and The Odin Project teach Ruby first before Javascript, if you're a beginner I was at the start of the year, you'll appreciate just how clean Ruby is compared to Javascript. What you absolutely must get in to your head is that the language is the tool, learning the syntax etc don't go crazy on it, that's why https://devdocs.io/ exists, learn to program, learn the logic of programming, yes you need the right tools for the job, but don't think the language makes a programmer, it doesn't what makes a programmer is being able to break down a task in to smaller elements and work through them. Last of all there's a vast amount of technologies with Web Dev, get the fundamentals down which is HTML easy to learn, but make sure you can cater for responsive web design and use semantic tags, header, main, section, aside, footer to structure the page, then learn CSS, I know of what I think is a decent CSS curriculum by IMM9o > https://dev.to/imm9o/i-built-my-own-css-curriculum-to-master-it-2ec2 and also available on GitHub > https://github.com/IMM9O/css-masterclass-curriculumI'm working through that curriculum so I become a CSS master (that's the hope, we'll see).I have used all my available quota of easy words today, so that's me done for the day. Enjoy my links and don't give up. Programming is difficult even for seasoned pros, just learn the logic of programming. I'm sure some people can suggest links for that, but maybe this post is already becoming an industry of overwhelming information. Good luck people, you don't stop learning after you leave school, that's a myth for the lazy.OH YES > Absolute respect going out to The MartianMan, heavyweight contender of the world of the de facto best Udemy links. Appreciating the free nature of your work good Sir. May you be justly rewarded in your future endeavours. Definitely out of words now. Peace to you all, and get to work!


Brilliant now that was helpful.. Cheers
Hi, as mentioned by op that udemy doesn’t have good instructors, wanted to know if anyone has done the above mentioned courses? How was it? Is it worth spending time on them? Btw I have enrolled in 4of them and thanks for posting
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text