950gm Fire Extinguisher £7.99 @ Aldi - don't assume it won't happen to you
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950gm Fire Extinguisher £7.99 @ Aldi - don't assume it won't happen to you

116
Found 29th Dec 2011
Last night I heard a strange clicking noise in the bedroom. Nearly ignored it and went to sleep as it was happening rarely. But didn't and discovered it was my hot air har styler sitting in my undies draw. I'd turned it off enough so the motor wasn't running but it was still slightly switched on. It was so hot I burned my fingers when picking it up. A bit scary when thinking what could have been if it had caught fire.

So when I was in Aldi today I spotted this and bought it. Not only is it good quality after a bit of googling it's also a great price.

BS certified
Lightweight aluminium body
Includes mounting clip
5 year warranty
Manufactured in the UK


Same spec extinguisher on Amazon is £10.03 and for an extra 50gms you would pay £14.99 for a 1kg extinguisher from Argos.

It's from a special buy starting today. I got mine from North Finchley. Hopefully I won't ever have to use it but living in a flat I think it's an especially good thing to have.

PS They have some of their ladies welly socks left too, reduced to £1.49 for two pairs. THey're excellent, great for under boots, thick and soft. The kids thick long socks are also reduced.

116 Comments

good price, but will only work for a few seconds. What sort is this? Water? CO2?

Original Poster

Powder

Made by this company britannia-fire.co.uk/ext…d=5 if you scroll down it's the pm50-02 there's data and fire safety sheets you can download.

Have some heat!

No pun intended!

A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use and can't get jammed. An extinguisher that's not serviced regularly isn't going to necessarily be any good when you finally have the need to use it, and probably won't be in the room you need it in at the time in any case!

Original Poster

Also the Amazon one expires end of 2014 this one expires end of 2016.

Blue Band denotes dry power.

These are ok for the car, but would go for a CO2 for the home, this thing will cause more mess than the fire lol

HSC

A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use … A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use and can't get jammed. An extinguisher that's not serviced regularly isn't going to necessarily be any good when you finally have the need to use it, and probably won't be in the room you need it in at the time in any case!


every house should have one of these, cheap and can save your life. Should be law imo

Original Poster

HSC

A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use … A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use and can't get jammed. An extinguisher that's not serviced regularly isn't going to necessarily be any good when you finally have the need to use it, and probably won't be in the room you need it in at the time in any case!



They're made to BS standard, they're not complicated, they just need replacing every five years or so. There's no reason why they should jam. I can understand if it's in a public place with people kicking etc on it but it should be fine on the bookcase in the hallway which is in the middle of the flat if I need it. It's also better than nothing.

It's made by a good company, it's not cheap tat.

Approved and certified to BS 6165
 Kitemarked product
 e marked in accordance with the aerosol
directive
 5 year warranty
 Manufactured in Great Britain
 Excellent fire ratings
 Lightweight aluminium body
 Reliability

carltonbp

but it should be fine on the bookcase in the hallway which is in the … but it should be fine on the bookcase in the hallway which is in the middle of the flat if I need it. It's also better than nothing.


I'd personally have it hanging on the wall just at the kitchen door, so it's easy to grab hold off, but at this price, you could afford to buy 2 of them. Agree with v6dlc that these can be messy but i guess if its the choice between fire damage, smoke damage or a little powder, i'd choose powder lol

batistawhc

every house should have one of these, cheap and can save your life. … every house should have one of these, cheap and can save your life. Should be law imo



Fire officers' advice to us recently was not to provide them but to encourage residents to flee the scene and call 999 instead unless it's a very minor fire (which of course could not be classed as life threatening). A lot of people succumb to smoke inhalation whilst fighting a fire which they could have survived if they'd left the building. Similarly with a car - with all that combustible fuel why would you stay nearby?

Powder extinguishers will fill a room to the point where you can't see in seconds.

If the fire was small enough for me to tackle, I would be bothered about the mess a powder extingusiher would create. C02 in the home for me I'm afraid.

HSC

Fire officers' advice to us recently was not to provide them but to … Fire officers' advice to us recently was not to provide them but to encourage residents to flee the scene and call 999 instead unless it's a very minor fire (which of course could not be classed as life threatening). A lot of people succumb to smoke inhalation whilst fighting a fire which they could have survived if they'd left the building. Similarly with a car - with all that combustible fuel why would you stay nearby?

True, but even if you did not use the blanket to put out the fire, you can wrap it around yourself to escape a major fire to save yourself from serious burns. Minor fire you can use the blanket for. As for a car, it has fuel, which is highly combustuable, and explosive so if the car is on fire, the ONLY option is to get to a safe distance as most if not all car fires, left on their own, will go up fast

v6dlc

Blue Band denotes dry power.These are ok for the car, but would go for a … Blue Band denotes dry power.These are ok for the car, but would go for a CO2 for the home, this thing will cause more mess than the fire lol



I have had occasion to use a powder extinguisher, and believe me, cleaning up the powder after is the least of your worries. The real issue is that if you don't have some way of putting out a fire early on, you will be cleaning up a huge pile of smouldering rubble.

v6dlc

Blue Band denotes dry power.These are ok for the car, but would go for a … Blue Band denotes dry power.These are ok for the car, but would go for a CO2 for the home, this thing will cause more mess than the fire lol



If you used this in the engine compartment you'd be as well letting the car burn.

HSC

A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use … A fire blanket could be a better investment because it's easier to use and can't get jammed. An extinguisher that's not serviced regularly isn't going to necessarily be any good when you finally have the need to use it, and probably won't be in the room you need it in at the time in any case!


it probably wont be in the room you need it in !!!!!!!!! so surely the blanket probably wont either!!!!!!!!

What I don't understand is why your styler was in a draw for a start, and still plugged in? No extinguisher will save you from being irresponsible.

My neighbours fire alarm goes off all the time and it drives me mad, I don't have one and I'm glad. It is a risk I'm prepared to take!

I have at least two extinguishers in every room in the house and three in the car.
If you find yourself in the unfortunate position of having a house fire, the last thing on your mind will be the mess of a powder extinguisher. Buy at least one today, it's better to be looking at it, than looking for it.

Interesting story by OP but why oh why do people leave these small electricals plugged in when not in use? My daughter's hair straighteners are a major source of worry (and argument!) in our house. With the kind of basic switches they have you are a millimeter or two away from disaster! Treat them like they have a naked flame!

Yes, an extinguisher may be a good idea but avoidance of the risk is a thousand times better.

Edited by: "Besford" 29th Dec 2011

I they made one of these that lasted at least 10-20 years I would buy but im always put off by the short expire periods, it would just collect dust and before you know it have to buy another, Would rather get a fire blanket.

Original Poster

aircanman

What I don't understand is why your styler was in a draw for a start, and … What I don't understand is why your styler was in a draw for a start, and still plugged in? No extinguisher will save you from being irresponsible.



It was turned off, at least I thought it was.

I assume you unplug everything after you've stopped using it. Your tv, computer, phone charger, hair dryer, nothing in your home right now that isn't being used is left plugged in. Of course you don't, so why am I irresponsible?

It was in the draw as I'd been rushing to go out and I placed it there. So what?

The item is plugged into a remote socket, I turn everything off at night at the plug using these, including TV etc including this usually but I didn't this time.
Edited by: "carltonbp" 29th Dec 2011

IT WONT HAPPEN TO ME

batistawhc

True, but even if you did not use the blanket to put out the fire, you … True, but even if you did not use the blanket to put out the fire, you can wrap it around yourself to escape a major fire to save yourself from serious burns. Minor fire you can use the blanket for. As for a car, it has fuel, which is highly combustuable, and explosive so if the car is on fire, the ONLY option is to get to a safe distance as most if not all car fires, left on their own, will go up fast




True, they go up as fast as the bhoys have soared to the top of the league!


Edited by: "Kingo" 29th Dec 2011

carltonbp

It was turned off, at least I thought it was.I assume you unplug … It was turned off, at least I thought it was.I assume you unplug everything after you've stopped using it. Your tv, computer, phone charger, hair dryer, nothing in your home right now that isn't being used is left plugged in. Of course you don't, so why am I irresponsible? It was in the draw as I'd been rushing to go out and I placed it there. So what?The item is plugged into a remote socket, I turn everything off at night at the plug using these, including TV etc including this usually but I didn't this time.



Maybe I donn't but I switch everything off on the item AND at the wall when i'm finished with it, hairdryers etc ALWAYS get unplugged too. Irresponsible is a touch harsh though perhaps careless is a touch less "in your face" either way I hope a lesson was learnt and all is well after all

Just a quick point, while powder and CO2 are good at knock down and stopping the flames, they don't remove the heat so if you don't cool the area down there's a significant risk of reignition.

jiggerypokery

I have at least two extinguishers in every room in the house and three in … I have at least two extinguishers in every room in the house and three in the car. If you find yourself in the unfortunate position of having a house fire, the last thing on your mind will be the mess of a powder extinguisher. Buy at least one today, it's better to be looking at it, than looking for it.


Wow, extreme!

carltonbp

It was turned off, at least I thought it was.I assume you unplug … It was turned off, at least I thought it was.I assume you unplug everything after you've stopped using it. Your tv, computer, phone charger, hair dryer, nothing in your home right now that isn't being used is left plugged in. Of course you don't, so why am I irresponsible? It was in the draw as I'd been rushing to go out and I placed it there. So what?The item is plugged into a remote socket, I turn everything off at night at the plug using these, including TV etc including this usually but I didn't this time.



Anything that generates a significant amount of heat, e.g. hair dryer, straightener etc gets turned off and unplugged every time it is used. It is irresponsible to leave things like this on to prevent exactly what happened to you.

Rich44

Maybe I donn't but I switch everything off on the item AND at the wall … Maybe I donn't but I switch everything off on the item AND at the wall when i'm finished with it, hairdryers etc ALWAYS get unplugged too.

I agree. Any kind of heat producing appliance should be unplugged, just in case, especially if it could cause a fire. Hair straighteners, fans, space heaters, and portable lamps all go into this category. Not doing so is careless.

For anyone after something more serious, you can often get good second hand bargains on bigger extinguishers. I got a 6 litre foam extinguisher and two 2kg CO2 ones for a total of 20 quid a few years ago. They were all only 3 years old and had been serviced each year, and provide much better reassurance than a piddly 1kg powder extinguisher.

I assume it wont happen to me...before I get too bored or drunk and spray this in the garden for fun.

Hot mind.

I love how everyone knows best about how/what they want with them in a fire - to be honest, if you've got the choice, I'd have a fully equipped fire appliance complete with crew at the ready. For the initial purchase I think it's about £200,000, then there's the crew's wages and maintenance, so I guess it's about £200,000 down plus £150,000 per year thereon. Sounds like a lot but it beats burning your house down or worse getting dry powder all over it. You can't put a price on safety! :-p

Aliwoo18

I love how everyone knows best about how/what they want with them in a … I love how everyone knows best about how/what they want with them in a fire - to be honest, if you've got the choice, I'd have a fully equipped fire appliance complete with crew at the ready. For the initial purchase I think it's about £200,000, then there's the crew's wages and maintenance, so I guess it's about £200,000 down plus £150,000 per year thereon. Sounds like a lot but it beats burning your house down or worse getting dry powder all over it. You can't put a price on safety! :-p


I'm sure an automated sprinkler system would be cheaper!

Or if you're worried about things getting wet, fill the system with 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane.

If you ever get the chance to go on a fire service fire safety and extinguisher course you'll see how utterly useless even bigger non-domestic extinguishers are in situations where a fire is bigger than a waste paper bin, so this this really isn't worth it.

A fire blanket MIGHT be useful but you're better off spending the time getting everyone out safely.

And if your car catches fire it would be amazingly and utterly foolhardy to lift the bonnet to try and use one of these. It would probably be the last thing you do.

"Drags soapbox to middle of room and climbs on it"

Sorry guys but having been in the fire service for years and the thing that frustrated us the most was what we called the Friday Night "P**ssed Up, Fry Up" where people came home having had a skinful and decide to have a fry up and turn the cooker on and then fall asleep.

Inevitably we got called to a "House fire, smoke issuing, persons reported" and we ended up carrying out bodies.

What we always found were smoke detectors with the covers open and the battery out.

Fire extinguishers are no good if you fall asleep and your room slowly fills with smoke. The chances are you will not wake up to fight the fire because you will slowly be overcome by the smoke/fumes or just lack of oxygen, and if you ever see the colour of the liquid that comes out of a persons body when they have died of smoke inhalation then the first thing you would do is make sure your smoke detectors are fitted, make sure you fit a new battery (what better time to remember than the new year), that you give it a quick hoover out to make sure dust does not stop the smoke from getting to the detector head and finally test it with a blown out candle or a blown out match. Pressing the button shows the alarm sounds but does not test the detector head, and to my knowledge I have never known of a case where the fire pushed the button.

Get testing, get safe.

"Steps down off soapbox"

Original Poster

davester2k

If you ever get the chance to go on a fire service fire safety and … If you ever get the chance to go on a fire service fire safety and extinguisher course you'll see how utterly useless even bigger non-domestic extinguishers are in situations where a fire is bigger than a waste paper bin, so this this really isn't worth it.A fire blanket MIGHT be useful but you're better off spending the time getting everyone out safely.And if your car catches fire it would be amazingly and utterly foolhardy to lift the bonnet to try and use one of these. It would probably be the last thing you do.



But if it is just the size of a bin and you catch it when it just starts it can prevent your house burning down and possibly people dying. That's what it's designed for, not for big fires, that's what you call 999 for. I don't think anyone is expecting it to be hugely powerful and to put out large fires, and hopefully if it does happen they'll know to get out and not waste time trying it.

Prevention is better than cure. Switch all your appliances off when you go to bed obviously apart from fridge/freezer. And close your doors properly, the amount of toxic smoke even a flimsy door can keep out of a room is astonishing. Ring your local fire station and request a free home fire risk assessment, they will discuss escape plans and fit smoke alarms for free. Above all don't take chances with fire, I work on Control and see the utter devastation it can cause every day. Get out, stay out, call the fire service out.

why not buy something that actually stands a chance of putting out a fire:

firemart.co.uk/web…169

9kg £30

** a very small fire
Edited by: "markeh" 29th Dec 2011

davester2k

And if your car catches fire it would be amazingly and utterly foolhardy … And if your car catches fire it would be amazingly and utterly foolhardy to lift the bonnet to try and use one of these. It would probably be the last thing you do.



Totally right.

With unleaded fuel burning more fiercely than the old leaded petrol, fuel injection systems pumping volumes of fuel forwards and some engines being manufactured with certain metals that can catch fire leaving you with a metal fire then extinguishers are the last thing you need. Get out, stand back and call the Fire Service.
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