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AA Battery Charger & Maintainer, For 6V & 12V Lead Acid and Gel Batteries - Black/Yellow - £20.64 delivered @ Amazon
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AA Battery Charger & Maintainer, For 6V & 12V Lead Acid and Gel Batteries - Black/Yellow - £20.64 delivered @ Amazon

£20.64£226%Amazon Deals
Expert (Beta) 17
Expert (Beta)
Posted 9th Dec 2019Edited by:"apur32"

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Essential product for the winter season when your car doesnt start in the morning Great Reviews too (4.5 out of 5.0)3359155.jpg
  • Provides the best type of charge to prolong battery life
  • Intelligent built-in microprocessor
  • Suitable for all types of 6V & 12V lead acid and gel batteries (IP65)
  • Reverse polarity protection
  • Short circuit protection

The AA Battery Charger & Maintainer, used and approved by AA Patrols, is an intelligent 'smart' battery maintainer and charger and is suitable for most car batteries. Ideal for situations where a top up-charge is needed and where you need the assurance that the charge level is accurate and safe to minimise any possible risk of battery damage. The inbuilt microprocessor senses the condition of the battery and controls the regulator to provide the right current and voltage to suit the correct level of charging.

Functions include:

Intelligent in-built microprocessor
Easy-to-read LED display
Reverse polarity protection
Short circuit protection
Charger memory
Water and dust-resistant
Suitable for all types of 6V & 12V lead acid and gel batteries (IP665)
Mains cable length: 2 m
Charging cable length: 1.5 m
1 x pair of crocodile clamps with 1.0m lead
1 x pair of eyelet connectors with 1.0m lead
Weight 725g
Insulation rating IP65

Technical Specification:

Output voltage: 6V or 12V
Current output: 1.0A - 1.2A DC (1.5A RMS)

Type of battery:
All types of lead acid batteries including wet acid, sealed, AGM, leisure type or gel batteries

Charge time (bulk charge up to 80%):
20 AH battery = time to charge 20 hours
50 AH battery = time to charge 50 hours
100 AH battery = time to charge 100 hours
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17 Comments
Just note that this will not charge a flat battery. I didn't realise this until I tried it on a friend's car. Thanking a passing motorist came to our aid with a proper jump starter. I wouldn't trust it to restart a car now and intend to invest in something better.
Predikuesi09/12/2019 09:39

Just note that this will not charge a flat battery. I didn't realise this …Just note that this will not charge a flat battery. I didn't realise this until I tried it on a friend's car. Thanking a passing motorist came to our aid with a proper jump starter. I wouldn't trust it to restart a car now and intend to invest in something better.



I bought a CTEK one for £90 off Amazon when my battery went flat. Haven't used it since. Typical!
For anyone looking for something more compact and USB powered, have a look at the Renogy USB trickle charger on Amazon. It works surprisingly well, I think it puts out 14v at 1.2A – from a 2.0A USB charger, 500mA from a standard 1A USB charger.
When your battery goes flat it's because it's had it.
freakstyler09/12/2019 11:02

For anyone looking for something more compact and USB powered, have a look …For anyone looking for something more compact and USB powered, have a look at the Renogy USB trickle charger on Amazon. It works surprisingly well, I think it puts out 14v at 1.2A – from a 2.0A USB charger, 500mA from a standard 1A USB charger.


How can a 2A USB charger (10w) put out 1.2A at 14v (16.8w) but probably 18w with conversation losses?
GAVINLEWISHUKD09/12/2019 11:47

How can a 2A USB charger (10w) put out 1.2A at 14v (16.8w) but probably …How can a 2A USB charger (10w) put out 1.2A at 14v (16.8w) but probably 18w with conversation losses?


Sorry, it was 13v at 1.25a

Specs:

Specifications:
1. Input:
-DC 5V / 2.4A Max
-DC 5V / 2A, 9V / 2A, 12V / 1.5A Max
2. Output:
-DC 13V⎓1.25A by 18W charger
-DC 13V⎓0.8A by 12W charger
-DC 13V⎓0.35A by 5W charger
3. Trickle charging current (maintenance stage): 300mA
4. Compatible batteries: 12V lead-acid batteries, SLA, AGM, etc up to 35Ah.

Top Tip.
Connect positive lead to negative, and negative lead to positive. The nice glowing fire speeds up defrosting the front windscreen.
Predikuesi09/12/2019 09:39

Just note that this will not charge a flat battery. I didn't realise this …Just note that this will not charge a flat battery. I didn't realise this until I tried it on a friend's car. Thanking a passing motorist came to our aid with a proper jump starter. I wouldn't trust it to restart a car now and intend to invest in something better.


This is what I found out with most 'smart' chargers. Completely useless if it doesn't charge a flat battery!
Edited by: "David23" 9th Dec 2019
David2309/12/2019 15:01

This is what I found out with most 'smart' chargers. Completely useless if …This is what I found out with most 'smart' chargers. Completely useless if it doesn't charge a flat battery!



These are good for if you put your car into winter hibernation, I have a Ring one, paid about 60 quid, better than a flat battery next springtime.
AA the company, not double-A batteries
This would only be good for trickle charging or for a small battery like motorbike really at 1.5 amp. Not worth buying in my opinion.
I think Lidl one is better buy for a budget charger (5 amp) and it'll be cheaper and much quicker than this.
Been using one of these for a few months, keeps the battery on my second car fully charged as expected. Long cables too.
David2309/12/2019 15:01

This is what I found out with most 'smart' chargers. Completely useless if …This is what I found out with most 'smart' chargers. Completely useless if it doesn't charge a flat battery!


If you have an AGM battery you won't have much of choice but to use microprocessor charger.
For standard lead acid you better off with good old fashioned one.
I'm a bit fresh on the idea of these things, I drive my car about once every 2 weeks the rest of the time it's parked on the road, I had a new battery roughly a year ago, do I need to keep maintaining the battery or does my driving regime do this?
Edited by: "atom" 9th Dec 2019
atom09/12/2019 21:16

I'm a bit fresh on the idea of these things, I drive my car about once …I'm a bit fresh on the idea of these things, I drive my car about once every 2 weeks the rest of the time it's parked on the road, I had a new battery roughly a year ago, do I need to keep maintaining the battery or does my driving regime do this?



Your battery is fairly new and driving it once every couple of weeks should keep it from going flat but this depends on how much you drive. It uses a fair amount of juice to start the car (especially large diesel engine) so you want to make sure that you've driven enough to recharge at least what was used to start the car. When you're not recharging to recover what was used to start the engine then the overall power of the battery is going to slowly go down over time.

I'm guessing you've been on this regime for a while in which case if you've had no issues thus far you should be OK.
SmashingK10/12/2019 15:03

Your battery is fairly new and driving it once every couple of weeks …Your battery is fairly new and driving it once every couple of weeks should keep it from going flat but this depends on how much you drive. It uses a fair amount of juice to start the car (especially large diesel engine) so you want to make sure that you've driven enough to recharge at least what was used to start the car. When you're not recharging to recover what was used to start the engine then the overall power of the battery is going to slowly go down over time.I'm guessing you've been on this regime for a while in which case if you've had no issues thus far you should be OK.


Thank you for responding very kind. It's a 12 year old petrol fiesta. I now understand that I need to at least replace the energy used to start the car etc. In terms of miles, would you say at least 20 per journey?
I now understand the battery won't last forever and over time it will go down.
I had had the car a couple of years and it was fine, I had a big hit to the battery when I had my hazards on for say 30 mins whilst the engine was off waiting for the recovery, this killed it off, I don't know what the condition of this was when I bought the car other than it worked, anyhow garage replaced it about a year ago. I just want to make sure I maintain this so I can understand better in terms of miles, some short journeys no do will only be 3 miles but I feel this is not enough. Would over 20 sound like a minimum?
Honestly it depends on the battery, the amount needed by the engine to start (can take longer to start an engine in winter) and the alternator which is what recharges the battery.

From what I've found online at least it doesn't take long and for your car (assuming it starts straight away) should recharge to its starting level within 10 minutes. You don't actually have to drive the car to recharge as the alternator will be charging even while the car is stationary.

I'm no professional though. Just spent a fair bit of time in the past researching those battery packs that are used for jump starting cars.
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