AirWheel Q3 Electric Dual Wheel Unicycle £199.99 instore @ Maplin
450°Expired

AirWheel Q3 Electric Dual Wheel Unicycle £199.99 instore @ Maplin

£199.99Maplin Deals
57
LocalFound 16th Feb
£389.00 on the Website but in-Store it's only £199.99 which INCLUDES the Stabilizers and Gel Knee Pads.

• Runs for up to two hours (approximately 24-28 miles) on a single charge
• Fully recharges in just two hours
• Speed along at up to 12mph
• Powered by a rechargeable 340 watt lithium ion battery
• Suitable for children 14 years of age and above
• Weight restriction between 50kg – 100kg

What features does the Q3 have?
The


AirWheel Q3 is a great dual wheeled electronic powered unicycle.


Offering additional stability, the top speed of this unicycle is 12mph.


The durable Q3 has a built-in carry handle and fold up foot pedals for


inside buildings or steps. Turn, accelerate and break by leaning in the


right direction with the intuitive control system and the automatic


limiter will stop you speeding on downhill slopes.

What’s the maximum carry weight for the Q3?
With


its hardy body, two 14 inch wheels, waterproof design and the ability


to travel up to 28 miles the Q3 is a great AirWheel. It can take loads


between 50kg and 100kg. Easy to charge using the supplied power lead,


the internal rechargeable lithium ion battery needs just two hours to


recharge for up to two hours of riding.

AirWheel


and Airboard riders do so at their own risk, and we encourage


responsible safe riding at all times. It is recommended that safety


equipment is worn at all times. Airwheels and Airboards are not to be


used on roads. Similar to a skateboard, restrictions on pavements apply,


for further information please click here.
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xeroc2 h, 20 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


Might have guessed you're a lawyer - it's taken you 216 words to repeat what Diggler01 said in just 8...
Cannot be used on roads or on pavements. If you have a long hallway at home you are in for a great time.
Yawn. Always when someone takes the time to post a deal like this, you get the same negative comments about not being allowed to ride it anywhere on earth.
Heat from me. Thanks for taking the time to post this deal.
Vive la resistance.... ✌
Heat added as soon as i woke up after xeroc's post
57 Comments
Dual Wheel... Two Wheels... Bi Wheel... Bicycle?
Cannot be used on roads or on pavements. If you have a long hallway at home you are in for a great time.
It's not legal for the road or pavement but the police don't give a if you ride on the pavement, park your car fully on the pavement next to a crossing, anything really.
A guy in my area whizzes around the city centre pavements on one of these and the police don't seem to care.

I get really nervous when I drive past him. I'm always worried he hits a bump and falls off the bloomin thing. He doesn't seem worried at all because he's too busy looking hip on it.
I'm not great on my own feet so a wheel I'd be no good.
Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.

Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether.

In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road!

Source: lawyer and cyclist
Edited by: "xeroc" 16th Feb
Yawn. Always when someone takes the time to post a deal like this, you get the same negative comments about not being allowed to ride it anywhere on earth.
Heat from me. Thanks for taking the time to post this deal.
Vive la resistance.... ✌
Heat added as soon as i woke up after xeroc's post
xeroc2 h, 20 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


Might have guessed you're a lawyer - it's taken you 216 words to repeat what Diggler01 said in just 8...
Ringpull Man, the superhero of Tunbridge Wells, gets away with riding it on the road.
33277434-Y3Qkh.jpg
Avatar
deleted1898409
xeroc2 h, 50 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


Lawyers are cool but I dislike cyclists
deleted189840916th Feb

Lawyers are cool but I dislike cyclists


Thank you for sharing that nugget with us !
I used to own a similar model, I think it was called the firewheel F532 or something. You need quite a large amount of space to practice riding these. Think open carparks etc as you need to get some speed up before you can balance on them. I tried learning in the carpark at the bottom of my block of flats and have plenty of bruises to show for it. Nowadays I've moved onto ebikes.
Cool
xeroc5 h, 41 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


Some copper pulls me over on this, he isn't getting my details. He can kiss my ****

Heat OP! Vive la resistance!
Edited by: "Dekard97" 17th Feb
Been riding IPS T350 model for over a year mostly to walk the dog, police saw me multiple times, on one occasion van pulled along and a woman officer said "you look so cool". My reply was "you too". So far so good.
heat
great price
if you don't ride it like a maniac, nobody gives a s**t. Police would probably tell you off for riding on the road rather than pavement
Good price but why don’t you just pedal and stay fit at the same time?
xeroc10 h, 17 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


In long, please ride them in public places or on the road.

Source: someone who isn't scared to live their life, I bet you're the type of person who blindly follows every law? Even if you don't agree with them. I don't. I do what's right. And what's right on this occasion is to do wheelies on this right outside your office...
10% extra off with an nus-extra fraud card
xeroc11 h, 13 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


Errr so doesn't that apply to electric bicycles too? What about those electric kids cars? Do kids have to get plates and can be arrested if they drive into someone's ankle, causing injury? What if I sit on my remote control car and make it move with the RC?
mtc111 h, 45 m ago

It's not legal for the road or pavement but the police don't give a It's not legal for the road or pavement but the police don't give a if you ride on the pavement, park your car fully on the pavement next to a crossing, anything really.


Well as long as hazard lights are put on you can park anywhere can't you?
ianlash8 h, 37 m ago

Ringpull Man, the superhero of Tunbridge Wells, gets away with riding it …Ringpull Man, the superhero of Tunbridge Wells, gets away with riding it on the road. [Image]


Cool as ass
Rusty821 h, 6 m ago

In long, please ride them in public places or on the road.Source: someone …In long, please ride them in public places or on the road.Source: someone who isn't scared to live their life, I bet you're the type of person who blindly follows every law? Even if you don't agree with them. I don't. I do what's right. And what's right on this occasion is to do wheelies on this right outside your office...


Lol a wheelie on a unicycle is surely a bunnyhop?
Can someone advise on how I can convince my wife it’s essential I have one of these..?
greysquaill12 h, 14 m ago

A guy in my area whizzes around the city centre pavements on one of these …A guy in my area whizzes around the city centre pavements on one of these and the police don't seem to care.I get really nervous when I drive past him. I'm always worried he hits a bump and falls off the bloomin thing. He doesn't seem worried at all because he's too busy looking hip on it.


I had to walk 3 miles to and from work for 2 weeks not so long ago due to my car being out of action. Every day I passed a chap travelling in the opposite direction on one of these things. I honestly thought it was amazing, such a good idea. I also saw him on the odd day walking and asked him where was his wheel. He says that he still likes to keep fit and walk.
I think that if you use a bit of sense and not use them on busy pavements then it's fine in reality. The problem is when people are reckless with them, which is why the law applies.
JoeMather26 m ago

Can someone advise on how I can convince my wife it’s essential I have one …Can someone advise on how I can convince my wife it’s essential I have one of these..?


Because when it breaks she can have the 340 Watt battery for her rabbit.
deleted189840916th Feb

Lawyers are cool but I dislike cyclists


Cyclists are cool but I dislike lawyers.
No810 h, 25 m ago

Might have guessed you're a lawyer - it's taken you 216 words to repeat …Might have guessed you're a lawyer - it's taken you 216 words to repeat what Diggler01 said in just 8...


Touche!
mtc113 h, 25 m ago

It's not legal for the road or pavement but the police don't give a It's not legal for the road or pavement but the police don't give a if you ride on the pavement, park your car fully on the pavement next to a crossing, anything really.


Until you kill someone
excellent!! cheers!!
Awesome deal!!!
xeroc15 h, 44 m ago

Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these …Also, do note that for the purposes of the Road Traffic Act 1988, these are both 'motor vehicles' and 'mechanically propelled'. Therefore not only is it illegal to ride these on the pavement or road (due to lack of registration and excise), but most of the criminal offences pertaining to 'normal' vehicle drivers will apply if you cause injury to someone while out and about including dangerous/careless driving and causing death by dangerous/careless driving, as well as drink driving limits. You would also need a driving licence to ride one, even if you could miraculously get it registered and insured (which you can't because they don't meet European safety standards). They are not treated as cycles for the purposes of road traffic law.Although many police will turn a blind eye, technically you could not only be charged for the old s72 HA 1835 offence (riding on the pavement - but that also applies to pedal cyclists), but also be arrested for driving a motor vehicle without excise or insurance. There are reported cases on Segweys and electric unicycles. People do get charged. That will lead to you seeing endorsements on your driving licence, fines, or being disqualified from driving (a car!) altogether. In short, please don't ride them in public places or on the road! Source: lawyer and cyclist


Under the Metropolitan Police Act 1839, it is illegal to fly a kite in a public place, which includes parks. According to the Act, any person “who shall fly any kite or play at any game to the annoyance of the inhabitants or passengers” could be liable to receive a fine of up to £500

Flying a Kite is illegal but these laws have never been enforced.
There is plenty of other old and stupid laws like being drunk in a pub is illegal

Section 32 of the Salmon Act 1986, specifically outlaws “handling salmon in suspicious circumstances”. Holding a Salnon Fish is illegal

It's illegal to clean your doormat after 8am
Edited by: "Norseg" 17th Feb
Thanks OP! Not sure if will get one though...I just wish it came with an extendable handle so you don't need to carry 13KG around...like this InMotion V3C:

33279560-NhBa8.jpg
I used to have one, but I became so cool that I became a sex magnet and it ruined my life.

Long story short, my genitals were worn down like a pencil eraser.
how to look like a complete tool buy one
0 to Dead in 10 seconds
Norseg17th Feb

Under the Metropolitan Police Act 1839, it is illegal to fly a kite in a …Under the Metropolitan Police Act 1839, it is illegal to fly a kite in a public place, which includes parks. According to the Act, any person “who shall fly any kite or play at any game to the annoyance of the inhabitants or passengers” could be liable to receive a fine of up to £500Flying a Kite is illegal but these laws have never been enforced. There is plenty of other old and stupid laws like being drunk in a pub is illegalSection 32 of the Salmon Act 1986, specifically outlaws “handling salmon in suspicious circumstances”. Holding a Salnon Fish is illegalIt's illegal to clean your doormat after 8am


You realise that kite flying is only banned if it causes annoyance?
IWantDiscountPlase7 h, 49 m ago

Errr so doesn't that apply to electric bicycles too? What about those …Errr so doesn't that apply to electric bicycles too? What about those electric kids cars? Do kids have to get plates and can be arrested if they drive into someone's ankle, causing injury? What if I sit on my remote control car and make it move with the RC?


There is an exception for EPAC vehicles which have a voltage no more than 36V and a motor no more than 250W.
These NEED to be powered by a human using pedals and the motor assists up to 15.5 MPH Maximum.
Any none EPAC is classed as a motor vehicle and requires MOT/IBAN/Insurance/Tax.
silly_entz8 h, 18 m ago

Lol a wheelie on a unicycle is surely a bunnyhop?


I don't think it's called anything because I don't think it's possible...
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