Akai A60011NR Bluetooth Rechargeable Vinyl Turntable Briefcase Style Featuring Bluetooth Connectivity (Red) - was £32.49 now £14.72 (Prime) £19.47 Non Prime @ Amazon
1251°Expired

Akai A60011NR Bluetooth Rechargeable Vinyl Turntable Briefcase Style Featuring Bluetooth Connectivity (Red) - was £32.49 now £14.72 (Prime) £19.47 Non Prime @ Amazon

115
Found 29th Dec 2017Edited by:"vassy4u"
  • Enjoy the nostalgia of vinyl records combined with modern-day functionalities
  • Plays 33, 45 and 78 RPM for varied album sizes and playing times
  • Connects to any Bluetooth enabled device for wireless playback at the press of a button
  • Two built-in high quality 5 W PMPO stereo speakers provide high audio quality
  • Rechargeable 1200 mAh lithium-ion battery offers up to 3 hours run-time

2866982.jpg

Item temporarily out of stock but available to order.
Community Updates
Dispatch 1-2 months

Groups

Top comments
i hear that these are crap all the time... it's the default for anyone who thinks they're a connoisseur of vinyl and yet folk were using these all-in-one decks all through the beatles, jimi hendrix and even early bowie. noone EVER whinged about how their vinyl was cut into one long ribbon due to using an old dansette or similar.

i have no idea if akai are the name they used to be... the price tells me not so but, man alive, i get tired of the parrotting of that trope (accurate or not) from folk who probably never owned vinyl before 2000 or else they fancy themselves with a dj origin... eff it, if folk were scratchin' vinyl on £2k decks during hip hop, i doubt these will do much damage to your vinyl if you're going to play them occasionally as a novelty.

i may now buy one just to spite you all... L)
When did we stop calling them records and record players? Vinyl is the material that a record is made from, you don’t call tapes ‘ferric oxides’ or cars ‘metal and rubbers’. Weird.
Say goodbye to your vinyl if you get this. Vinyl is expensive so why would you want to ruin it with a cheap player. Perfectly fine if you want terrible sound and you can afford to replace your vinyl often
What a bunch of whingers on here, best leave your records safe in the sleeve under laboratory conditions just in case a piece of dust lands on it.
Anyone that worried about sound quality would have already purchased a digital version anyways.
Heat added, for under fifteen quid I can stick my old records on again, woohoo.
115 Comments
Junk.
Say goodbye to your vinyl if you get this. Vinyl is expensive so why would you want to ruin it with a cheap player. Perfectly fine if you want terrible sound and you can afford to replace your vinyl often
Utter trash.
Professional vinyl scratcher.
i hear that these are crap all the time... it's the default for anyone who thinks they're a connoisseur of vinyl and yet folk were using these all-in-one decks all through the beatles, jimi hendrix and even early bowie. noone EVER whinged about how their vinyl was cut into one long ribbon due to using an old dansette or similar.

i have no idea if akai are the name they used to be... the price tells me not so but, man alive, i get tired of the parrotting of that trope (accurate or not) from folk who probably never owned vinyl before 2000 or else they fancy themselves with a dj origin... eff it, if folk were scratchin' vinyl on £2k decks during hip hop, i doubt these will do much damage to your vinyl if you're going to play them occasionally as a novelty.

i may now buy one just to spite you all... L)
Ordered, thanks op.
Price dropped to below £15 now.... Cheers OP
I just love this for a home decor accessory
Bound to be a bit pants but I got one for the Mrs who has been moaning that she wants to hear her old vinyl again. As for those moaning about these cheapo devices shredding records this is the type of player that everyone owned back in the 60's. If the manky old Dansette record players were OK with your records and can't see these being much worse
I haven’t played my 80’s vinyl for many many years . This is a no brainer for those tempted to get all those old discs out of the loft and bring back some memories
Ordered then cancelled after reading comments
When did we stop calling them records and record players? Vinyl is the material that a record is made from, you don’t call tapes ‘ferric oxides’ or cars ‘metal and rubbers’. Weird.
ally14111 h, 32 m ago

I haven’t played my 80’s vinyl for many many years . This is a no brainer f …I haven’t played my 80’s vinyl for many many years . This is a no brainer for those tempted to get all those old discs out of the loft and bring back some memories


To be honest I think you should reorder. I have one similar to this and used for over a year. None of my records have exploded / scratched or tried to kill me as a result.

Yes I agree it is probably not going to be as good as one made by a better brand etc but equally its not quite the “vinyl killing machine” that some make out.

Sound quality is ok - but what would I expect for something that is priced between £15-30??

Personally I think these things are ok and as presterjohn71 rightly says definitely no different to the record player my parents got me from Woolies in the early 80’s and all of my records survived that too.
Don't understand how this would ruin your viny? I have one which is a bush from argos, works well but speakers aren't up to much. It can however be plugged into a better speaker. Gets very good reviews. This one looks very similar to bush model and other makes I have seen, one for £50 in HMV! Will take back if it ruins any records.
these decks do cause permanent damage to your records upon first play, and more upon subsequent players. dansettes were popular in the 60s and they caused similar damage too, reason why i have a bunch of old records from the 60s that look like they've been attacked by a slasher. if you are only playing back on such a player you probably won't notice as the sound quality will be so bad to begin with (mainly because few people will use a proper amp/speaker setup to hear what's being played properly, and will use inbuilt speakers or some bluetooth speaker dock instead).

the damage is caused because you have a non calibrated setup with a stylus rotating in a groove up to 45 times a minute, heating up the vinyl as it spins, like a hot knife through butter, and as the stylus can't be calibrated it's not going to sit perfectly in the groove, and therefore slice chunks of the vinyl that will then almost instantly cool in a damaged condition

play back a damaged record like that on a good setup and compare to a new undamaged record and you will hear the difference, with more pops and clicks on the damaged on

it's a cheap price so if you are digging out old records that were played on crap decks in the past, like 80s midi systems with plastic platters, you probably aren't going to make things much worse, but if you have any ideas of buying new vinly and playing it on a cheap player and getting good sound quality, you are better off getting a decent amp and speaker setup and playing a cd or flac files from a pc. if you are used to crap midi systems with turntables and bluetooth docks with ipods and phones, instead of proper hifi seperates setups with good amps and speakers you may not know what you are missing
uni2 m ago

these decks do cause permanent damage to your records upon first play, and …these decks do cause permanent damage to your records upon first play, and more upon subsequent players. dansettes were popular in the 60s and they caused similar damage too, reason why i have a bunch of old records from the 60s that look like they've been attacked by a slasher. if you are only playing back on such a player you probably won't notice as the sound quality will be so bad to begin with (mainly because few people will use a proper amp/speaker setup to hear what's being played properly, and will use inbuilt speakers or some bluetooth speaker dock instead).the damage is caused because you have a non calibrated setup with a stylus rotating in a groove up to 45 times a minute, heating up the vinyl as it spins, like a hot knife through butter, and as the stylus can't be calibrated it's not going to sit perfectly in the groove, and therefore slice chunks of the vinyl that will then almost instantly cool in a damaged conditionplay back a damaged record like that on a good setup and compare to a new undamaged record and you will hear the difference, with more pops and clicks on the damaged onit's a cheap price so if you are digging out old records that were played on crap decks in the past, like 80s midi systems with plastic platters, you probably aren't going to make things much worse, but if you have any ideas of buying new vinly and playing it on a cheap player and getting good sound quality, you are better off getting a decent amp and speaker setup and playing a cd or flac files from a pc. if you are used to crap midi systems with turntables and bluetooth docks with ipods and phones, instead of proper hifi seperates setups with good amps and speakers you may not know what you are missing


What would you suggest for starting out then ?
What a bunch of whingers on here, best leave your records safe in the sleeve under laboratory conditions just in case a piece of dust lands on it.
Anyone that worried about sound quality would have already purchased a digital version anyways.
Heat added, for under fifteen quid I can stick my old records on again, woohoo.
Vinyl ages.... if you want something that'll last your life time, buy digital.
uni12 m ago

these decks do cause permanent damage to your records upon first play, and …these decks do cause permanent damage to your records upon first play, and more upon subsequent players. dansettes were popular in the 60s and they caused similar damage too, reason why i have a bunch of old records from the 60s that look like they've been attacked by a slasher. if you are only playing back on such a player you probably won't notice as the sound quality will be so bad to begin with (mainly because few people will use a proper amp/speaker setup to hear what's being played properly, and will use inbuilt speakers or some bluetooth speaker dock instead).the damage is caused because you have a non calibrated setup with a stylus rotating in a groove up to 45 times a minute, heating up the vinyl as it spins, like a hot knife through butter, and as the stylus can't be calibrated it's not going to sit perfectly in the groove, and therefore slice chunks of the vinyl that will then almost instantly cool in a damaged conditionplay back a damaged record like that on a good setup and compare to a new undamaged record and you will hear the difference, with more pops and clicks on the damaged onit's a cheap price so if you are digging out old records that were played on crap decks in the past, like 80s midi systems with plastic platters, you probably aren't going to make things much worse, but if you have any ideas of buying new vinly and playing it on a cheap player and getting good sound quality, you are better off getting a decent amp and speaker setup and playing a cd or flac files from a pc. if you are used to crap midi systems with turntables and bluetooth docks with ipods and phones, instead of proper hifi seperates setups with good amps and speakers you may not know what you are missing

Usual nonsense by somebody who is younger than a lot of the records I bought new. Old vinyl is damaged as previous owners chucked them about, like frisbees, rested tea in them, used them to cut out circles etc etc when vinyl was cheap and "throw away" I have record s I played on anything going that might have a reassuring little crackle at the start but perfect . This will have the same needle as 99% of players under £100
Ordered. Prime price. Thanks op
Excellent price, one ordered for my son's birthday mid Jan. Thanks.
esq358520 m ago

What would you suggest for starting out then ?



it depends on your budget and what you want and what you currently have. do you have a decent amp and speaker setup, do you have records and/or cds, what other music playback devices do you have

if you have nothing and starting out as a teenager, i'd imagine someone will have a phone and or laptop/tablet that can play mp3/flac/spotify etc. next look for a decent amp and speaker setup. you may get a cheap or even free setup on freecycle or ebay. get a 3.5mm phono to RCA cable and plug in the amp and connect the speakers and with any half decent amp and speaker setup you will likely blow any speaker dock away. then from there you can look at adding a cd player or other devices and then start reading up on amps and speakers etc and upgrade from there. i've been upgrading kit for decades but still use a lot of old kit as a second setup
use once place expensive vinyl record in bin...............
kramer208818 m ago

Usual nonsense by somebody who is younger than a lot of the records I …Usual nonsense by somebody who is younger than a lot of the records I bought new. Old vinyl is damaged as previous owners chucked them about, like frisbees, rested tea in them, used them to cut out circles etc etc when vinyl was cheap and "throw away" I have record s I played on anything going that might have a reassuring little crackle at the start but perfect . This will have the same needle as 99% of players under £100



it's not nonsense at all. it's all factually correct. you don't seem to have any idea how old i am either, nor have much knowledge about turntables based on your post. turntables don't usually have needles these days. needles were used for playing 78 rpm shellacs. 33 and 45 rpm vinly records are played with a stylus which is usually made from a diamond. it's the way the arm is set to track on a record with the correct weight that counts. these cheap players usually don't let you calibrate the player so just huge a high weight on the record which is one of the main reasons records get damaged upon first play as the needle is forced through the grooves at a high speed and high weight, basically bulldozing through the vinyl. i've got 3 turntables at the moment and a dansette was my first record player in the 70s, an actual dansette, and i still have badly damaged records that were played on it. so if what you say is correct you must be a pensioner
Just to let you all know: these things are mass produced in China with no branding. They are then shipped out and various companies slap their name on them. They ARE junk. They WILL damage your records over time. They DO sound dreadful (even if you plug in to a separate hifi).
Sure, if all you want is something pretty to look at, then buy this, but don't kid yourself that you will get a 'vinyl' experience with this other than bad sound and some nostalgia.
Nick_Price45 m ago

What a bunch of whingers on here, best leave your records safe in the …What a bunch of whingers on here, best leave your records safe in the sleeve under laboratory conditions just in case a piece of dust lands on it.Anyone that worried about sound quality would have already purchased a digital version anyways.Heat added, for under fifteen quid I can stick my old records on again, woohoo.


But why do you want to stick your old records on? I don't understand... genuinely? Is it purely the action of taking a record from a sleeve and putting the needle down?
Price has gone back up.
gunark2 h, 4 m ago

When did we stop calling them records and record players? Vinyl is the …When did we stop calling them records and record players? Vinyl is the material that a record is made from, you don’t call tapes ‘ferric oxides’ or cars ‘metal and rubbers’. Weird.


Because young people these days will mistakenly read it as 'record-play', ie the verbs record and play, not the noun record. They need to be educated that this means a vinyl disc, on a spinning platter. Etc.
Oos now
drewbles828 h, 42 m ago

Say goodbye to your vinyl if you get this. Vinyl is expensive so why would …Say goodbye to your vinyl if you get this. Vinyl is expensive so why would you want to ruin it with a cheap player. Perfectly fine if you want terrible sound and you can afford to replace your vinyl often



That's par for the course if you're a vinyl junkie together with cloth ears
Ré Dansette comments

What people dont know, or have forgotten, is that back when the Dansette and its ilk were brought out, records were made from shellac,NOT vyn
uni43 m ago

it's not nonsense at all. it's all factually correct. you don't seem to …it's not nonsense at all. it's all factually correct. you don't seem to have any idea how old i am either, nor have much knowledge about turntables based on your post. turntables don't usually have needles these days. needles were used for playing 78 rpm shellacs. 33 and 45 rpm vinly records are played with a stylus which is usually made from a diamond. it's the way the arm is set to track on a record with the correct weight that counts. these cheap players usually don't let you calibrate the player so just huge a high weight on the record which is one of the main reasons records get damaged upon first play as the needle is forced through the grooves at a high speed and high weight, basically bulldozing through the vinyl. i've got 3 turntables at the moment and a dansette was my first record player in the 70s, an actual dansette, and i still have badly damaged records that were played on it. so if what you say is correct you must be a pensioner



The bit from the above, that many people will skip over and ignore is the fact those 1950s and 60s records were made from SHELLAC, which was MUCH HARDER than modern vinyl, yet was still damaged quite quickly by this type of player.

A modern stylus has a downforce of ~1.5 - 4.5 grammes; an old ceramic cartridge typically STARTS at 10 grammes, and a badly designed one (like this), may easily reach 20, 30, even 50 grammes. Even my Nans old player had a counter weight!!

Anyone on here with a stylus gauge who is willing to buy this POS and weigh the downforce??
tooplanx25 m ago

But why do you want to stick your old records on? I don't understand... …But why do you want to stick your old records on? I don't understand... genuinely? Is it purely the action of taking a record from a sleeve and putting the needle down?


Not that I'm planning on buying this , the sheer amount of arguments on here have addled my brain . However I still have a fair amount of my original record collection , not all of it was from bands that made it big , and so it's now impossible to locate on other formats . So from my personal perspective it would be to listen to songs that are lost to me. at the moment.
Edited by: "tinkerbellian" 29th Dec 2017
Oos at discounted price. Full price available only.
Edited by: "Vicjoaid" 29th Dec 2017
Great machine - have one! why to people insist on sharing fake stories on this website - damage records - nonsense
Showing at full price 😔
esq35851 h, 25 m ago

What would you suggest for starting out then ?


If you have a proper hi-fi with an amp, get a second hand record player deck off ebay. If you don't, I recommend an Audio-Technica LP-60 as a good simple record player. There are some music-snobs who say that they are not good enough, but they really are being silly. I bought a briefcase record player like this initially as I thought, "Well it's got a lot of features, is portable and looks good," however when it arrived I realised that it was pretty much a plastic toy that was partly faulty and sounded worse than playing an mp3 through my phone. I then did a bit more research and got the LP-60 which I've been very pleased with and sounds great.
When did vinyl collectors become dull again.. were much more fun in 90s when the dance scene kept vinyl alive..
Mods expire deal, returned to full price
Now back up to 32quid?
Can still order at the discounted price, it’s just temporarily out of stock. Place the order to secure the price
uni1 h, 35 m ago

it's not nonsense at all. it's all factually correct. you don't seem to …it's not nonsense at all. it's all factually correct. you don't seem to have any idea how old i am either, nor have much knowledge about turntables based on your post. turntables don't usually have needles these days. needles were used for playing 78 rpm shellacs. 33 and 45 rpm vinly records are played with a stylus which is usually made from a diamond. it's the way the arm is set to track on a record with the correct weight that counts. these cheap players usually don't let you calibrate the player so just huge a high weight on the record which is one of the main reasons records get damaged upon first play as the needle is forced through the grooves at a high speed and high weight, basically bulldozing through the vinyl. i've got 3 turntables at the moment and a dansette was my first record player in the 70s, an actual dansette, and i still have badly damaged records that were played on it. so if what you say is correct you must be a pensioner


Your right a decent stylus used to cost about the same in the early 80's.I remember we used to go into my local john menzies now wh smith and they were all stores in their own little cases.My brother used to set them up for me.Also akai is rubbish now.A great brand now gone but in name only.
Edited by: "sandstone1" 29th Dec 2017
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text