Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
AKAI Professional LPK25 | Portable USB-powered MIDI Keyboard £29 at Amazon
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AKAI Professional LPK25 | Portable USB-powered MIDI Keyboard £29 at Amazon

£29£3619%Amazon Deals
55
Refreshed 2nd Mar (Posted 29th Feb)

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Update 1
Back in stock
Cheapest it's ever been on Amazon (and haven't seen it on sale elsewhere).

Probably the best entry-level midi keyboard, had my eye on it for a while.

  • Production in your pocket - 13-Inch, slim-line laptop performance keyboard with 25 velocity-sensitive mini-keyboard keys for playing melodies, bass lines, chords and more
  • Full range performance - Dedicated octave up and down buttons to increase the keyboard to the full melodic range plus a sustain button for expressive performances
  • Packed with features - On-board arpeggiator steps through chords automatically and generates inspiring melodic ideas quickly
  • Customized production experience - Four programmable memory banks for instant recall of mappings for DAWs, virtual instruments, effects and more
  • Effortless setup - USB-powered and plug-and-play setup for Mac and PC
  • Works with all popular applications - GarageBand, Logic, Sonar, Cubase, Ableton Live, ProTools, Reason, Fruity Loops, Digital Performer and more
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For those people who don't know (there are reviews on Amazon by people who bought it without having a clue..).

This is a controller keyboard. It doesn't make any sounds by itself, it needs to be plugged into a computer or other device. You need software to make music with it.

You don't need to pay a fortune for a decent DAW (digital audio workstation) though, there are several good free ones. For example Cakewalk - bandlab.com/pro…alk
MrKrabs02/03/2020 20:00

I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's …I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's round a mates house. Have things moved on at all or is it still the defacto standard? I'm guessing the sound effects are all in software nowadays.


In short:

- MIDI is still the standard

- MIDI connectors are dead, though. Nowadays, it's all just MIDI data sent via USB

- You still need a DAW to receive the MIDI data your keyboard outputs

- Cakewalk is now a free DAW. Google for it, and get yourself a copy.

- To turn the MIDI into audio, you'll need some sort of sampler, which will run within the DAW as a VST plugin. The most popular is Kontakt Player (free), and you can then download (paid for or free) Virtual Instruments which run within that.

- One of the biggest changes is the availability of convolution reverbs, They're amazing - a good virtual instrument's samples are normally recorded pretty dry, but a good convolution reverb puts that virtual instrument in a virtual space of your choosing, which makes it sound more real than anything you'd have heard in the 90s.

- One big caveat is that you'll likely need an Audio Interface which supports ASIO drivers, because WDM and DirectAudio is still as laggy as it's always been, and while onboard audio has improved in terms of quality, it still often lacks ASIO support. That's not changed since the 90s, unfortunately.

If you're happy to spend a bit of money, look into Studio One and the Komplete 12 suite. They're what I use, and I love them to bits.
55 Comments
I bought one of these for £34 from Amazon in October. That was the lowest price it had been for a long time, I didn't expect it to get any lower.

Good keyboard. I found the keys to be a little stiff at first, but I got used to it.

No DAW software included, but there was also a voucher in the box giving 20% off Ableton live.
thanks, ordered with £5 promo


40013277-tv15S.jpg
Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally not those toy alike ones, thanks
40013359-qHyVh.jpg
OP thanks great price. Heat and ordered
For those people who don't know (there are reviews on Amazon by people who bought it without having a clue..).

This is a controller keyboard. It doesn't make any sounds by itself, it needs to be plugged into a computer or other device. You need software to make music with it.

You don't need to pay a fortune for a decent DAW (digital audio workstation) though, there are several good free ones. For example Cakewalk - bandlab.com/pro…alk
fantasist29/02/2020 12:52

Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally …Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally not those toy alike ones, thanks


Definitely not this product as it is a MIDI controller that does not make sound, as Dealier explains above.
If you'd like to step up to something more "proper" as a learning tool, the Yamaha PSR range, and Casio have TONS of models that you may wish to consider. Also look into piano learning apps if you have an iPad.
chischis29/02/2020 13:56

Definitely not this product as it is a MIDI controller that does not make …Definitely not this product as it is a MIDI controller that does not make sound, as Dealier explains above.If you'd like to step up to something more "proper" as a learning tool, the Yamaha PSR range, and Casio have TONS of models that you may wish to consider. Also look into piano learning apps if you have an iPad.


Thanks a lot, will definitely check those out
fantasist29/02/2020 12:52

Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally …Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally not those toy alike ones, thanks


I highly recommend hoffmanacademy.com/ - my kids (7yr & 9yr at the time they started) went through it for a year or two before moving on to an actual piano teacher. Has some good articles on it's website about what to look for in a keyboard, and what age to start. They normally have a 10-20% sale on the yearly rate at the start of US summer holidays and at black friday.

Also, this will be a good read for more ideas of what to prioritise: thewirecutter.com/rev…rs/
redzarf29/02/2020 14:40

I highly recommend https://www.hoffmanacademy.com/ - my kids (7yr & 9yr at …I highly recommend https://www.hoffmanacademy.com/ - my kids (7yr & 9yr at the time they started) went through it for a year or two before moving on to an actual piano teacher. Has some good articles on it's website about what to look for in a keyboard, and what age to start. They normally have a 10-20% sale on the yearly rate at the start of US summer holidays and at black friday.Also, this will be a good read for more ideas of what to prioritise: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-budget-digital-piano-for-beginners/


Thanks
"professional" lol
Reiko929/02/2020 15:37

"professional" lol



Ok, it isn't. AKAI Pro aren't what they used to be.

But I do own one of these and they do exactly what they say they do. Plastic construction of course, and the mini keys are okay, but it does its job and it's super portable.
Apologies, new to these controllers. Can this link to an iPad with an adapter? If so is the wired version better than the bt wireless version in terms of stability, key lag etc..?
badabling29/02/2020 15:42

Which promo?



sorry, I meant a £5 promo credit I was sent because they cancelled my order.
Reiko929/02/2020 15:37

"professional" lol


It's a range name. However, for a travelling, professional songwriter / music producer, this is an ideal piece of kit that fits cabin baggage.
Dealier29/02/2020 13:16

For those people who don't know (there are reviews on Amazon by people who …For those people who don't know (there are reviews on Amazon by people who bought it without having a clue..).This is a controller keyboard. It doesn't make any sounds by itself, it needs to be plugged into a computer or other device. You need software to make music with it.You don't need to pay a fortune for a decent DAW (digital audio workstation) though, there are several good free ones. For example Cakewalk - https://www.bandlab.com/products/cakewalk


Reaper is pretty good too, with vst support
fantasist29/02/2020 12:52

Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally …Any recommendations for a 4 year old to start learning keyboard? Ideally not those toy alike ones, thanks


Casio px-s1000
Showing as £35 now
Oh, this is really cheap. It will make a great addition to my midi controller collection, thanks!
Edited by: "TopTrump" 2nd Mar
Can this link to an iPad ?
Chrissybh0y02/03/2020 15:59

Can this link to an iPad ?


They can but you need to buy an Apple Lightning to USB 3 Camera adapter, which is annoyingly more expensive than the keyboard itself (about £40 I think). However, it works great with loads of apps, including free apps like Garageband and, if you want to learn to play, Simply Piano. I have one and use it with an iPad Air 2.
Not a bad controller but it only has 25 tiny keys - ok if space is a premium.
If you don't mind paying a little more (shop around as there are always deals) I'd recommend the versatile M-Audio Keystation 49 Mk3. It has 49 full sized keys, is a great little bit of additional kit both for studios and live performance and comes with a good bundle of software. It can also be hooked up to a sustain pedal.
The Akai is a bit more than a toy but a little limited although good for anyone just starting to dabble with DAWs.
Nevertheless, heat for the deal as great for anyone trying out as a beginner.
why not just buy a cheap keyboard with sound?
Fugazy02/03/2020 18:30

why not just buy a cheap keyboard with sound?


Can you link to one?
Fugazy02/03/2020 18:30

why not just buy a cheap keyboard with sound?


I think your missing the point of a midi controller and it’s possibilities
I have this and the apc 25. I have limitations in my room for a 49 key, which is great as I can adjust the octaves accordingly.
Fugazy02/03/2020 18:30

why not just buy a cheap keyboard with sound?


Because you can do so much more with one of these.
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chischis29/02/2020 16:04

Ok, it isn't. AKAI Pro aren't what they used to be.But I do own one of …Ok, it isn't. AKAI Pro aren't what they used to be.But I do own one of these and they do exactly what they say they do. Plastic construction of course, and the mini keys are okay, but it does its job and it's super portable.


I bought one of their MPD controllers and couldn't believe how bad/unresponsive the pads were, considering that is what they're famous for (on the MPC line)...
40028999-uSboS.jpgI actually returned it to Amazon thinking it must be faulty, got another one, it was the same. Apparently their old controllers are better but I CBA finding a second hand one.
Fugazy02/03/2020 18:30

why not just buy a cheap keyboard with sound?


Because this is something completely different.
Dealier29/02/2020 13:16

For those people who don't know (there are reviews on Amazon by people who …For those people who don't know (there are reviews on Amazon by people who bought it without having a clue..).This is a controller keyboard. It doesn't make any sounds by itself, it needs to be plugged into a computer or other device. You need software to make music with it.You don't need to pay a fortune for a decent DAW (digital audio workstation) though, there are several good free ones. For example Cakewalk - https://www.bandlab.com/products/cakewalk


I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's round a mates house. Have things moved on at all or is it still the defacto standard? I'm guessing the sound effects are all in software nowadays.
Edited by: "MrKrabs" 2nd Mar
I want it but don't know why
MrKrabs02/03/2020 20:00

I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's …I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's round a mates house. Have things moved on at all or is it still the defacto standard? I'm guessing the sound effects are all in software nowadays.



Cakewalk has improved a lot since then, but it's been overtaken by other DAWs. I don't think you can do much better for free though.
Have a look at this for an idea of the top DAWs: musicradar.com/new…mac
I have one of these and it's decent, I think it was more than this second hand. I use it more than a bigger, more powerful one just because in the end it does the stuff I need a MIDI keyboard to do a lot of the time.

As far as DAWs go, Reaper is brilliant value for money (being free, but pay not-very-much for a licence if you like it), especially with v6 fresh out.
MrKrabs02/03/2020 20:00

I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's …I used to use a midi keyboard and cakewalk home studio back in the 90's round a mates house. Have things moved on at all or is it still the defacto standard? I'm guessing the sound effects are all in software nowadays.


In short:

- MIDI is still the standard

- MIDI connectors are dead, though. Nowadays, it's all just MIDI data sent via USB

- You still need a DAW to receive the MIDI data your keyboard outputs

- Cakewalk is now a free DAW. Google for it, and get yourself a copy.

- To turn the MIDI into audio, you'll need some sort of sampler, which will run within the DAW as a VST plugin. The most popular is Kontakt Player (free), and you can then download (paid for or free) Virtual Instruments which run within that.

- One of the biggest changes is the availability of convolution reverbs, They're amazing - a good virtual instrument's samples are normally recorded pretty dry, but a good convolution reverb puts that virtual instrument in a virtual space of your choosing, which makes it sound more real than anything you'd have heard in the 90s.

- One big caveat is that you'll likely need an Audio Interface which supports ASIO drivers, because WDM and DirectAudio is still as laggy as it's always been, and while onboard audio has improved in terms of quality, it still often lacks ASIO support. That's not changed since the 90s, unfortunately.

If you're happy to spend a bit of money, look into Studio One and the Komplete 12 suite. They're what I use, and I love them to bits.
Thank you for that you two, I'll have a read up. Glad to see things have moved on.
Pájaro02/03/2020 21:55

In short:- MIDI is still the standard- MIDI connectors are dead, though. …In short:- MIDI is still the standard- MIDI connectors are dead, though. Nowadays, it's all just MIDI data sent via USB- You still need a DAW to receive the MIDI data your keyboard outputs- Cakewalk is now a free DAW. Google for it, and get yourself a copy.- To turn the MIDI into audio, you'll need some sort of sampler, which will run within the DAW as a VST plugin. The most popular is Kontakt Player (free), and you can then download (paid for or free) Virtual Instruments which run within that. - One of the biggest changes is the availability of convolution reverbs, They're amazing - a good virtual instrument's samples are normally recorded pretty dry, but a good convolution reverb puts that virtual instrument in a virtual space of your choosing, which makes it sound more real than anything you'd have heard in the 90s. - One big caveat is that you'll likely need an Audio Interface which supports ASIO drivers, because WDM and DirectAudio is still as laggy as it's always been, and while onboard audio has improved in terms of quality, it still often lacks ASIO support. That's not changed since the 90s, unfortunately. If you're happy to spend a bit of money, look into Studio One and the Komplete 12 suite. They're what I use, and I love them to bits.


MIDI connectors are far from dead - my Korgs use them.
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