Aldi Kamado BBQ £349.99 @ Aldi
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Aldi Kamado BBQ £349.99 @ Aldi

£349.99ALDI Deals
188
Found 29th Apr
Aldi are offering a kamado bbq for £350

Ive got a kamado joe so not for me but kamados are great bits of kit so anyone who doesn't want to drop £1000 on the big name brands but would like one then this is well worth a look


Fire up those garden parties with the addition of this outstanding Kamado Outdoor Oven. Coming in a timeless gunmetal colour, this outdoor oven will help you feed all your guests throughout the day. Features of the barbecue include two cooking grills, two bamboo shelves, a temperature gauge, ceramic upper fire ring, ceramic fire box, a grill elevator and lifter, a heat detector, chimney vent, rain cover and an ash cleaning tool.

Features
Ready to cook in 15 minutes
Double-walled
Insulated
Provides food with a rich, smoky flavour
Ceramic fire box with fire grate
Built in temperature gauge
Bands
Handle
Chimney vent
Stainless steel hinge springs and ash door
Includes 2 cooking grills
First level cooking grill approx. 41cm
Grill elevator
Grill lifter
Ceramic heat deflector
Ash cleaning tool
Durable powder coated steel stand
4 castors (2 with brakes)
2 Bamboo side shelves
Polyester rain cover
Effective heat retention
Easy to start and control
Even and effective heat
No flare ups
Spanner & Allen key included
Guarantee/Warranty
3 Years
Safety Warning
Barbecues must not be used indoors or in confined spaces. Risk of Carbon Monoxide poisoning.
Suitable Use
Sear steaks, roast chickens, bake pizzas, slow cook stews, smoke fish, cook paella and use as a tandoori.
Brand: Gardenline
Colour: Gunmetal
Dimensions: 115.3 x 113.5 x 65cm approx.
Material: Powder coated steel, ceramic, bamboo
Product Type: BBQ's
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Top comments
percyrush2 h, 8 m ago

7 quid each time you cook food ..ok dudey


percyrush2 h, 46 m ago

thats 30 quid just to light the frikin thing


Look, we got it on your first post. You cannot/do not want to afford this. Thats fine, move on.. Why disrupt the thread with your repeated cries of anguish about how much this costs.

The fact remains that people can afford a Kamado Joe. Which costs £1250. The OP has posted an alternative that costs 25% of that & with a good review from experts. So it is a deal for those looking for such an item. Spending £350 instead of £1250 to me sounds like a bargain. Particularly if you are not too sure about the Kamado method of cooking and want to try it without loosing too much money in the process. Right?

So your lack of a disposable income means nothing to the people looking at this deal. So move onto something else please and let the interested folk actually have sensible discussion about Kamado BBQ's.
badgerman2619 m ago

I’ve bitten. Anyone got a subscription to share the summary? I like to r …I’ve bitten. Anyone got a subscription to share the summary? I like to read reviews to justify my purchases from hukd


A quick search online reveals that kamado barbecues are currently all the rage with foodies who are looking for the perfect smoky flavour. Rival name brands, such as Big Green Egg or Kamado Joe, cost up to £1,000 or more, so is this kamado barbecue from Aldi a bargain at only £350? Find out in our first look review.

Pros: Kamado-style barbecuing on a budget that produces delicious food
Cons: The quality of the temperature gauge and shelves could be better.

If you want to try kamado grilling then this budget model from Aldi is well worth buying. It may not come with as many accessories as rival name-brand models, such as Big Green Egg and Kamado Joe, but it still cooks a decent barbecue. The Aldi kamado egg must be stored away with the rain cover that comes with it. This prevents condensation forming inside the all-important temperature gauge.

What is it?

If a gas barbecue is GCSE-level grilling, then a kamado egg is a PhD. It's aimed at those who are deeply into barbecuing and want to replicate the smoky, rich flavours of the barbecues of the southern states of the USA. The Aldi instruction booklet provides minimal advice about how to cook with this kamado egg barbecue, so we found ourselves watching cooking demonstration videos on YouTube.

Tempted by these, we tried to smoke a beef brisket for several hours at a low temperature. However, we failed to control the temperature well enough at one point and it got too high, so the meat was burnt to a crisp. Undeterred, we tried chicken wings, which were smoked for 45 minutes and then cooked on an open grill more akin to the charcoal grills many of us are familiar with. The chicken wings worked really well and tasted delicious. Similarly, grilling pork-shoulder steaks at the high searing temperature produced tasty results, although it was disconcerting to have to shut the lid of the barbecue so that we couldn't see them cooking.

One curious difference between using a kamado egg and an ordinary charcoal barbecue is that it's all about the cooking temperature, which you read using the gauge on the lid. As soon as it reaches the right temperature, you're ready to cook. This often happens when the charcoal is still black and feels strange after years of waiting for the coals to turn white-hot with an ordinary charcoal barbecue.

It feels like a mental challenge when you first take on kamado grilling, but the results are worth it. If you're prepared to learn the art of moving the vents to manipulate the cooking temperature and to dedicate the necessary hours to smoking your meats for the best flavours, then it's for you.

What's good about it?

Compared with many other barbecues, this is a synch to put together. It's easily done in an hour. The stand fixes together easily and provides a solid base for the egg to sit on. There are some nice touches, such as castors to make the barbecue easy to roll around; very important as it's so heavy. Brakes on two of the castors stop the barbecue moving when you don't want it to.

The main thing to bear in mind is how heavy this grill is. You'll need two strong people to lift it on to the stand. When doing this, make sure that the door to open and shut the vent at the bottom is between the legs or you won't be able to use this vital tool for adjusting the temperature. The barbecue comes with a spanner but you'll need a cross-head screwdriver to assemble the base.

The instructions for putting it together are relatively simple to follow but there are a few parts that are numbered and then not used in making the barbecue, which feels a bit disconcerting. The leaflet could definitely do with a list of the names for each part supplied.


Is there anything I should watch out for?

The build quality for the main barbecue is great but the accessories let it down. There are two bamboo slatted shelves, which can be lowered to make it smaller for storage. These are sturdy and useful for holding plates and utensils. However, the varnish on them was damaged when a hot dish was put on them.

Most annoying was the temperature gauge, which became filled with condensation and was hard to read when the barbecue was left outdoors without its rain cover for a night.

Kamado barbecuing is all about getting the grill to particular temperatures, so it was a real pain when this happened. Never leave the barbecue uncovered when not in use.

Is there anything else I should know?

The booklet advises 'curing' the egg before you use it for the first time for cooking. This involves burning a couple of handfuls of charcoal at 200-250ºC until they are used up and extinguish naturally. This isn't a quick process, so give yourself time to do it before you have your first barbecue - the day before would be a good plan.

The booklet that comes with the barbecue suggests putting fire lighters in a roll of newspaper, but we found it easier to leave out the newspaper and light the firelighters direct so they caught the charcoal quickly.

The temperature gauge has both centigrade and Fahrenheit, so look carefully to make sure you're reading the correct one.

Models from more expensive brands have a two-part heat deflector, which gives greater flexibility. The Aldi model comes with a limited range of accessories, but you should be able to buy ones from other brands.

Which? first look verdict

If you want to take your barbecuing to the next level with a kamado barbecue but don't want to spend big bucks on its name-brand rivals, this is a decent model to buy.
percyrush58 m ago

how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i …how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i doubt) will be 52. so even at that rate of once a month each bbq will be costing you 30 quid BEFORE the food!



Why are you throwing it away after a single year of use?
percyrush17 m ago

does it cook vegan?


Perfectly
They realy benefit from low and slow cooking to soften up the tough leathery hide
188 Comments
Thanks for sharing, this is tempting! I am keeping an eye on Costco’s one in case they drop the price like last year. Anyone has any experience with this one? Seems to have all the necessary accessories (eg heat deflector).
Looks good. Are these a lot better than standard BBQs
I see Which have had a look at it but I don’t have a subscription with them.
nakis7613 m ago

Thanks for sharing, this is tempting! I am keeping an eye on Costco’s one i …Thanks for sharing, this is tempting! I am keeping an eye on Costco’s one in case they drop the price like last year. Anyone has any experience with this one? Seems to have all the necessary accessories (eg heat deflector).


Its a new product aldi are selling to sort of jump on the bbq bandwagon so i dont think there will be much about reviews wise
But kamados have been around for 100s of years so it would be difficult for them to get it wrong
And with all the accessories included it makes the price even better

When i bought my kamado joe years ago (back when they still sold the black ones in the uk) it cost me about £800 and all i got with it was the ash too and grill gripper everything else was extra
badgerman269 m ago

Looks good. Are these a lot better than standard BBQs


There alot more versatile
You can slowly smoke food at realy low temperatures or crank it up to 900° and cook a pizza or sear a steak
Then it does everything inbetween too
ChambyR335 m ago

There alot more versatile You can slowly smoke food at realy low …There alot more versatile You can slowly smoke food at realy low temperatures or crank it up to 900° and cook a pizza or sear a steakThen it does everything inbetween too


Great thanks. Sounds good. Do they take a lot of work to get going and up to tempture etc
Thanks OP, I've been looking for an affordable alternative to the Kamado Joe.
i got the costco pit boss one for £400 last year and love it (its cheaper instore compared to the website, but you need a large vehicle/van to fit it in, i barely managed to get it into my estate car (after removing the outer box)

i have a friend with a BGE and theres very little difference in build quality. just that the BGE was three times the price.
badgerman2618 m ago

Great thanks. Sounds good. Do they take a lot of work to get going and up …Great thanks. Sounds good. Do they take a lot of work to get going and up to tempture etc


There is a bit of a learning curve with the temperature (all about adjusting the top and bottom vents to increase or restrict the airflow) so seems like a bit more work than a normal bbq
But once you get the hang of it you can get up and running in no time
And there so efficient that charcoal last alot longer
Ive slow cooked a full brisket for 20+ hours on one load of lump and still had plenty left to cook with next time
wanye15 m ago

i got the costco pit boss one for £400 last year and love it (its cheaper …i got the costco pit boss one for £400 last year and love it (its cheaper instore compared to the website, but you need a large vehicle/van to fit it in, i barely managed to get it into my estate car (after removing the outer box)i have a friend with a BGE and theres very little difference in build quality. just that the BGE was three times the price.


I think alot of it is just brand snobbery
The only reason i went with the Kamado Joe over a cheaper brand after researching it all was the lifetime warrenty on all the ceramics
Other than that you pitboss will cook just aswell as my joe
ChambyR3344 m ago

Its a new product aldi are selling to sort of jump on the bbq bandwagon so …Its a new product aldi are selling to sort of jump on the bbq bandwagon so i dont think there will be much about reviews wiseBut kamados have been around for 100s of years so it would be difficult for them to get it wrong



Kamado portable rice steamers have been around in Japan for hundreds of years, but Kamado cookers repurposed as grills have only been around since the end of the Second World when US servicemen stationed in Japan started using them for barbecue. Kamado grills, like this, have only been around since the 1960's.
This looks ace and I’m very tempted - could replace my Weber Smokey Mountain and Master Touch... but a dude in Texas told me that I really need an offset, so, for that reason, I’m out.

Have some heat though. This is an awesome deal.
go for it .
nakis762 h, 38 m ago

I see Which have had a look at it but I don’t have a subscription with t …I see Which have had a look at it but I don’t have a subscription with them.


I’ve bitten. Anyone got a subscription to share the summary? I like to read reviews to justify my purchases from hukd
The quality (or lack of) of my BBQ cooking would not justify me spending more that £30 on any BBQ :-) - hats off to all of you who can do magic cooking in the garden.
In Britain you don't really get the weather to justify buying one of these.
badgerman2619 m ago

I’ve bitten. Anyone got a subscription to share the summary? I like to r …I’ve bitten. Anyone got a subscription to share the summary? I like to read reviews to justify my purchases from hukd


A quick search online reveals that kamado barbecues are currently all the rage with foodies who are looking for the perfect smoky flavour. Rival name brands, such as Big Green Egg or Kamado Joe, cost up to £1,000 or more, so is this kamado barbecue from Aldi a bargain at only £350? Find out in our first look review.

Pros: Kamado-style barbecuing on a budget that produces delicious food
Cons: The quality of the temperature gauge and shelves could be better.

If you want to try kamado grilling then this budget model from Aldi is well worth buying. It may not come with as many accessories as rival name-brand models, such as Big Green Egg and Kamado Joe, but it still cooks a decent barbecue. The Aldi kamado egg must be stored away with the rain cover that comes with it. This prevents condensation forming inside the all-important temperature gauge.

What is it?

If a gas barbecue is GCSE-level grilling, then a kamado egg is a PhD. It's aimed at those who are deeply into barbecuing and want to replicate the smoky, rich flavours of the barbecues of the southern states of the USA. The Aldi instruction booklet provides minimal advice about how to cook with this kamado egg barbecue, so we found ourselves watching cooking demonstration videos on YouTube.

Tempted by these, we tried to smoke a beef brisket for several hours at a low temperature. However, we failed to control the temperature well enough at one point and it got too high, so the meat was burnt to a crisp. Undeterred, we tried chicken wings, which were smoked for 45 minutes and then cooked on an open grill more akin to the charcoal grills many of us are familiar with. The chicken wings worked really well and tasted delicious. Similarly, grilling pork-shoulder steaks at the high searing temperature produced tasty results, although it was disconcerting to have to shut the lid of the barbecue so that we couldn't see them cooking.

One curious difference between using a kamado egg and an ordinary charcoal barbecue is that it's all about the cooking temperature, which you read using the gauge on the lid. As soon as it reaches the right temperature, you're ready to cook. This often happens when the charcoal is still black and feels strange after years of waiting for the coals to turn white-hot with an ordinary charcoal barbecue.

It feels like a mental challenge when you first take on kamado grilling, but the results are worth it. If you're prepared to learn the art of moving the vents to manipulate the cooking temperature and to dedicate the necessary hours to smoking your meats for the best flavours, then it's for you.

What's good about it?

Compared with many other barbecues, this is a synch to put together. It's easily done in an hour. The stand fixes together easily and provides a solid base for the egg to sit on. There are some nice touches, such as castors to make the barbecue easy to roll around; very important as it's so heavy. Brakes on two of the castors stop the barbecue moving when you don't want it to.

The main thing to bear in mind is how heavy this grill is. You'll need two strong people to lift it on to the stand. When doing this, make sure that the door to open and shut the vent at the bottom is between the legs or you won't be able to use this vital tool for adjusting the temperature. The barbecue comes with a spanner but you'll need a cross-head screwdriver to assemble the base.

The instructions for putting it together are relatively simple to follow but there are a few parts that are numbered and then not used in making the barbecue, which feels a bit disconcerting. The leaflet could definitely do with a list of the names for each part supplied.


Is there anything I should watch out for?

The build quality for the main barbecue is great but the accessories let it down. There are two bamboo slatted shelves, which can be lowered to make it smaller for storage. These are sturdy and useful for holding plates and utensils. However, the varnish on them was damaged when a hot dish was put on them.

Most annoying was the temperature gauge, which became filled with condensation and was hard to read when the barbecue was left outdoors without its rain cover for a night.

Kamado barbecuing is all about getting the grill to particular temperatures, so it was a real pain when this happened. Never leave the barbecue uncovered when not in use.

Is there anything else I should know?

The booklet advises 'curing' the egg before you use it for the first time for cooking. This involves burning a couple of handfuls of charcoal at 200-250ºC until they are used up and extinguish naturally. This isn't a quick process, so give yourself time to do it before you have your first barbecue - the day before would be a good plan.

The booklet that comes with the barbecue suggests putting fire lighters in a roll of newspaper, but we found it easier to leave out the newspaper and light the firelighters direct so they caught the charcoal quickly.

The temperature gauge has both centigrade and Fahrenheit, so look carefully to make sure you're reading the correct one.

Models from more expensive brands have a two-part heat deflector, which gives greater flexibility. The Aldi model comes with a limited range of accessories, but you should be able to buy ones from other brands.

Which? first look verdict

If you want to take your barbecuing to the next level with a kamado barbecue but don't want to spend big bucks on its name-brand rivals, this is a decent model to buy.
badgerman263 h, 6 m ago

Looks good. Are these a lot better than standard BBQs


Yeh, these dont rust and keep heat inside while cooking, also cooks evenly
scallygally26 m ago

In Britain you don't really get the weather to justify buying one of these.



Just use it under a basic cover if raining. Heat retention is excellent, so ambient temperature makes little difference
scallygally30 m ago

In Britain you don't really get the weather to justify buying one of these.


Ive cooked on my kamado in the snow
Quite often cook xmas dinner on it too so the weather doesnt affect theese things
wanye3 h, 0 m ago

i got the costco pit boss one for £400 last year and love it (its cheaper …i got the costco pit boss one for £400 last year and love it (its cheaper instore compared to the website, but you need a large vehicle/van to fit it in, i barely managed to get it into my estate car (after removing the outer box)i have a friend with a BGE and theres very little difference in build quality. just that the BGE was three times the price.


when did they reduce it - hoping to get one this year
does it cook vegan?
percyrush17 m ago

does it cook vegan?


Perfectly
They realy benefit from low and slow cooking to soften up the tough leathery hide
no no no I muuuuust reeesissst ! ooops too late I am in .... roll on Summer cooking errrr "thanks" OP (joking aside great first post!) welcome aboard
ChambyR3331 m ago

Perfectly They realy benefit from low and slow cooking to soften up the …Perfectly They realy benefit from low and slow cooking to soften up the tough leathery hide


i have no idea...
I've been researching these for ages. I got one!
how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i doubt) will be 52. so even at that rate of once a month each bbq will be costing you 30 quid BEFORE the food!
thats 30 quid just to light the frikin thing
bangytupper2 h, 1 m ago

A quick search online reveals that kamado barbecues are currently all the … A quick search online reveals that kamado barbecues are currently all the rage with foodies who are looking for the perfect smoky flavour. Rival name brands, such as Big Green Egg or Kamado Joe, cost up to £1,000 or more, so is this kamado barbecue from Aldi a bargain at only £350? Find out in our first look review.Pros: Kamado-style barbecuing on a budget that produces delicious foodCons: The quality of the temperature gauge and shelves could be better.If you want to try kamado grilling then this budget model from Aldi is well worth buying. It may not come with as many accessories as rival name-brand models, such as Big Green Egg and Kamado Joe, but it still cooks a decent barbecue. The Aldi kamado egg must be stored away with the rain cover that comes with it. This prevents condensation forming inside the all-important temperature gauge.What is it?If a gas barbecue is GCSE-level grilling, then a kamado egg is a PhD. It's aimed at those who are deeply into barbecuing and want to replicate the smoky, rich flavours of the barbecues of the southern states of the USA. The Aldi instruction booklet provides minimal advice about how to cook with this kamado egg barbecue, so we found ourselves watching cooking demonstration videos on YouTube.Tempted by these, we tried to smoke a beef brisket for several hours at a low temperature. However, we failed to control the temperature well enough at one point and it got too high, so the meat was burnt to a crisp. Undeterred, we tried chicken wings, which were smoked for 45 minutes and then cooked on an open grill more akin to the charcoal grills many of us are familiar with. The chicken wings worked really well and tasted delicious. Similarly, grilling pork-shoulder steaks at the high searing temperature produced tasty results, although it was disconcerting to have to shut the lid of the barbecue so that we couldn't see them cooking.One curious difference between using a kamado egg and an ordinary charcoal barbecue is that it's all about the cooking temperature, which you read using the gauge on the lid. As soon as it reaches the right temperature, you're ready to cook. This often happens when the charcoal is still black and feels strange after years of waiting for the coals to turn white-hot with an ordinary charcoal barbecue.It feels like a mental challenge when you first take on kamado grilling, but the results are worth it. If you're prepared to learn the art of moving the vents to manipulate the cooking temperature and to dedicate the necessary hours to smoking your meats for the best flavours, then it's for you.What's good about it?Compared with many other barbecues, this is a synch to put together. It's easily done in an hour. The stand fixes together easily and provides a solid base for the egg to sit on. There are some nice touches, such as castors to make the barbecue easy to roll around; very important as it's so heavy. Brakes on two of the castors stop the barbecue moving when you don't want it to.The main thing to bear in mind is how heavy this grill is. You'll need two strong people to lift it on to the stand. When doing this, make sure that the door to open and shut the vent at the bottom is between the legs or you won't be able to use this vital tool for adjusting the temperature. The barbecue comes with a spanner but you'll need a cross-head screwdriver to assemble the base.The instructions for putting it together are relatively simple to follow but there are a few parts that are numbered and then not used in making the barbecue, which feels a bit disconcerting. The leaflet could definitely do with a list of the names for each part supplied.Is there anything I should watch out for?The build quality for the main barbecue is great but the accessories let it down. There are two bamboo slatted shelves, which can be lowered to make it smaller for storage. These are sturdy and useful for holding plates and utensils. However, the varnish on them was damaged when a hot dish was put on them.Most annoying was the temperature gauge, which became filled with condensation and was hard to read when the barbecue was left outdoors without its rain cover for a night.Kamado barbecuing is all about getting the grill to particular temperatures, so it was a real pain when this happened. Never leave the barbecue uncovered when not in use.Is there anything else I should know?The booklet advises 'curing' the egg before you use it for the first time for cooking. This involves burning a couple of handfuls of charcoal at 200-250ºC until they are used up and extinguish naturally. This isn't a quick process, so give yourself time to do it before you have your first barbecue - the day before would be a good plan.The booklet that comes with the barbecue suggests putting fire lighters in a roll of newspaper, but we found it easier to leave out the newspaper and light the firelighters direct so they caught the charcoal quickly.The temperature gauge has both centigrade and Fahrenheit, so look carefully to make sure you're reading the correct one.Models from more expensive brands have a two-part heat deflector, which gives greater flexibility. The Aldi model comes with a limited range of accessories, but you should be able to buy ones from other brands.Which? first look verdictIf you want to take your barbecuing to the next level with a kamado barbecue but don't want to spend big bucks on its name-brand rivals, this is a decent model to buy.


Thank you so much for this! Greatly appreciated!
Bought one, I do love the look of these things...
percyrush34 m ago

how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i …how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i doubt) will be 52. so even at that rate of once a month each bbq will be costing you 30 quid BEFORE the food!


I was doing that maths. I was thinking as spent a lot I would be more motivated to try out things like roasts chickens to Pizzas. So hope to get it £6.70 per bbq and use it weekly.
bangytupper2 h, 34 m ago

A quick search online reveals that kamado barbecues are currently all the …A quick search online reveals that kamado barbecues are currently all the rage with foodies who are looking for the perfect smoky flavour. Rival name brands, such as Big Green Egg or Kamado Joe, cost up to £1,000 or more, so is this kamado barbecue from Aldi a bargain at only £350? Find out in our first look review.Pros: Kamado-style barbecuing on a budget that produces delicious foodCons: The quality of the temperature gauge and shelves could be better.If you want to try kamado grilling then this budget model from Aldi is well worth buying. It may not come with as many accessories as rival name-brand models, such as Big Green Egg and Kamado Joe, but it still cooks a decent barbecue. The Aldi kamado egg must be stored away with the rain cover that comes with it. This prevents condensation forming inside the all-important temperature gauge.What is it?If a gas barbecue is GCSE-level grilling, then a kamado egg is a PhD. It's aimed at those who are deeply into barbecuing and want to replicate the smoky, rich flavours of the barbecues of the southern states of the USA. The Aldi instruction booklet provides minimal advice about how to cook with this kamado egg barbecue, so we found ourselves watching cooking demonstration videos on YouTube.Tempted by these, we tried to smoke a beef brisket for several hours at a low temperature. However, we failed to control the temperature well enough at one point and it got too high, so the meat was burnt to a crisp. Undeterred, we tried chicken wings, which were smoked for 45 minutes and then cooked on an open grill more akin to the charcoal grills many of us are familiar with. The chicken wings worked really well and tasted delicious. Similarly, grilling pork-shoulder steaks at the high searing temperature produced tasty results, although it was disconcerting to have to shut the lid of the barbecue so that we couldn't see them cooking.One curious difference between using a kamado egg and an ordinary charcoal barbecue is that it's all about the cooking temperature, which you read using the gauge on the lid. As soon as it reaches the right temperature, you're ready to cook. This often happens when the charcoal is still black and feels strange after years of waiting for the coals to turn white-hot with an ordinary charcoal barbecue.It feels like a mental challenge when you first take on kamado grilling, but the results are worth it. If you're prepared to learn the art of moving the vents to manipulate the cooking temperature and to dedicate the necessary hours to smoking your meats for the best flavours, then it's for you.What's good about it?Compared with many other barbecues, this is a synch to put together. It's easily done in an hour. The stand fixes together easily and provides a solid base for the egg to sit on. There are some nice touches, such as castors to make the barbecue easy to roll around; very important as it's so heavy. Brakes on two of the castors stop the barbecue moving when you don't want it to.The main thing to bear in mind is how heavy this grill is. You'll need two strong people to lift it on to the stand. When doing this, make sure that the door to open and shut the vent at the bottom is between the legs or you won't be able to use this vital tool for adjusting the temperature. The barbecue comes with a spanner but you'll need a cross-head screwdriver to assemble the base.The instructions for putting it together are relatively simple to follow but there are a few parts that are numbered and then not used in making the barbecue, which feels a bit disconcerting. The leaflet could definitely do with a list of the names for each part supplied.Is there anything I should watch out for?The build quality for the main barbecue is great but the accessories let it down. There are two bamboo slatted shelves, which can be lowered to make it smaller for storage. These are sturdy and useful for holding plates and utensils. However, the varnish on them was damaged when a hot dish was put on them.Most annoying was the temperature gauge, which became filled with condensation and was hard to read when the barbecue was left outdoors without its rain cover for a night.Kamado barbecuing is all about getting the grill to particular temperatures, so it was a real pain when this happened. Never leave the barbecue uncovered when not in use.Is there anything else I should know?The booklet advises 'curing' the egg before you use it for the first time for cooking. This involves burning a couple of handfuls of charcoal at 200-250ºC until they are used up and extinguish naturally. This isn't a quick process, so give yourself time to do it before you have your first barbecue - the day before would be a good plan.The booklet that comes with the barbecue suggests putting fire lighters in a roll of newspaper, but we found it easier to leave out the newspaper and light the firelighters direct so they caught the charcoal quickly.The temperature gauge has both centigrade and Fahrenheit, so look carefully to make sure you're reading the correct one.Models from more expensive brands have a two-part heat deflector, which gives greater flexibility. The Aldi model comes with a limited range of accessories, but you should be able to buy ones from other brands.Which? first look verdictIf you want to take your barbecuing to the next level with a kamado barbecue but don't want to spend big bucks on its name-brand rivals, this is a decent model to buy.


Thanks mate. Review sounds good although more about the class of bbq than this versus others in the class (albeit 2-3x price).
7 quid each time you cook food ..ok dudey
badgerman265 m ago

I was doing that maths. I was thinking as spent a lot I would be more …I was doing that maths. I was thinking as spent a lot I would be more motivated to try out things like roasts chickens to Pizzas. So hope to get it £6.70 per bbq and use it weekly.


Probably even less when you factor in how efficient theese are with fuel

Ive said before that i think my kamado cost less to run than my oven does
First thoughts 'this looks good for £34.99' then WTF??? when I realised the actual price.
Edited by: "paulandpam1" 29th Apr
percyrush58 m ago

how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i …how many bbqs will you be having a year? even at once a month? (which i doubt) will be 52. so even at that rate of once a month each bbq will be costing you 30 quid BEFORE the food!



Why are you throwing it away after a single year of use?
YIMan3 m ago

Why are you throwing it away after a single year of use?


are you using it every week then?
come on kids its christmas day lets have a barby in the snow lol
You might as well get your money's worth if you're chucking it away after a year.
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