Amy Winehouse "Back to Black" vinyl only £8.99 for PureHMV members
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Amy Winehouse "Back to Black" vinyl only £8.99 for PureHMV members

£8.99£20.99 57% HMV Deals
12
Found 16th Nov
Fantastic LP at a superb price for PureHMV members

12 Comments

Seems totally pointless to me. This was originally a cd

Supermod

These PureHMV offers are great for vinyl. I won't be buying this one but grabbed the Nirvana one they had not so long ago and I always look forward to the next. Cheers @Jonmurgie

Any idea how long this on for

Original Poster

jasee30 m ago

Seems totally pointless to me. This was originally a cd


Yawn... move along then

jasee4 h, 9 m ago

Seems totally pointless to me. This was originally a cd


It was originally recorded to tape or a computer as a multi-track; 16 or more.
Then it was mixed to stereo and mastered for CD and will also be mastered separately for download formats.
So the vinyl version will just be another separate master from the original mix.
The CD version is not definitive in any real way.

Agharta18 m ago

It was originally recorded to tape or a computer as a multi-track; 16 or …It was originally recorded to tape or a computer as a multi-track; 16 or more. Then it was mixed to stereo and mastered for CD and will also be mastered separately for download formats. So the vinyl version will just be another separate master from the original mix. The CD version is not definitive in any real way.



Except for quality, dynamic range etc

jasee14 m ago

Except for quality, dynamic range etc

The definitive consumer version would be 24/96 or higher as CD is too compromised a format to be considered definitive.

Agharta8 h, 18 m ago

The definitive consumer version would be 24/96 or higher as CD is too …The definitive consumer version would be 24/96 or higher as CD is too compromised a format to be considered definitive.



Are you talking about the bit rate? Ok, it's impossible to completely accurately reproduce an analogue signal with any bit rate. So what?
But equally it's impossible for anything with mass (a stylus) to accurately trace a record groove The cutter head was driven, the playing stylus was a passive device. Attempts were made to alter the shape of the stylus so it didn't cause permanent damage to the groove, but this was impossible. The grooves were always damaged. Then there is inner groove distortion (unavoidable) Difficulties because the cutter head parallel tracked, whereas almost all pickup arms followed a circular path. There is the RiAA curve. A compromise to compensate as frequencies rise for the falling amptitude of the signal at the cutting head and difficulties a low frequencies (rumble etc). There is also crosstalk between the two signals.
Haha. So, the vinyl disk is not a 'compromised format'?
The battle between cds and vinyl was fought and lost by the likes of Linn in the 1980s. Even they were forced to produce a cd player. Though they continue to produce record players for those stupid enough to buy them.
Edited by: "jasee" 17th Nov

jasee4 h, 4 m ago

Are you talking about the bit rate? Ok, it's impossible to completely …Are you talking about the bit rate? Ok, it's impossible to completely accurately reproduce an analogue signal with any bit rate. So what? But equally it's impossible for anything with mass (a stylus) to accurately trace a record groove The cutter head was driven, the playing stylus was a passive device. Attempts were made to alter the shape of the stylus so it didn't cause permanent damage to the groove, but this was impossible. The grooves were always damaged. Then there is inner groove distortion (unavoidable) Difficulties because the cutter head parallel tracked, whereas almost all pickup arms followed a circular path. There is the RiAA curve. A compromise to compensate as frequencies rise for the falling amptitude of the signal at the cutting head and difficulties a low frequencies (rumble etc). There is also crosstalk between the two signals.Haha. So, the vinyl disk is not a 'compromised format'? The battle between cds and vinyl was fought and lost by the likes of Linn in the 1980s. Even they were forced to produce a cd player. Though they continue to produce record players for those stupid enough to buy them.


I sold my thousand vinyl albums in the 90s so this has no interest for me.
The only point I was making is that music is not recorded for CD but in the best current way and then mastered for various listening formats.
Hence your point has no bearing.

Agharta14 m ago

I sold my thousand vinyl albums in the 90s so this has no interest for me. …I sold my thousand vinyl albums in the 90s so this has no interest for me. The only point I was making is that music is not recorded for CD but in the best current way and then mastered for various listening formats. Hence your point has no bearing.



It was usually recorded on a master tape. Not sure what happened then. Not sure what happens now. But however it's pretty obvious from what I said previously that the nearest to the original master would be a cd. The vinyl edition would be far far worse. And wouldn't last any length of time. Especially with today's crude record decks. So why are people rushing out to buy vinyl? I have no idea.
The only exception I can see is when a cd version was never produced. Even then a cd version could be produced if the original master tape was available.

Vinyl > all
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